IJERPH, Vol. 18, Pages 10963: Associating Land Cover Changes with Patterns of Incidences of Climate-Sensitive Infections: An Example on Tick-Borne Diseases in the Nordic Area

IJERPH, Vol. 18, Pages 10963: Associating Land Cover Changes with Patterns of Incidences of Climate-Sensitive Infections: An Example on Tick-Borne Diseases in the Nordic Area International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health doi: 10.3390/ijerph182010963 Authors: Didier G. Leibovici Helena Bylund Christer Björkman Nikolay Tokarevich Tomas Thierfelder Birgitta Evengård Shaun Quegan Some of the climate-sensitive infections (CSIs) affecting humans are zoonotic vector-borne diseases, such as Lyme borreliosis (BOR) and tick-borne encephalitis (TBE), mostly linked to various species of ticks as vectors. Due to climate change, the geographical distribution of tick species, their hosts, and the prevalence of pathogens are likely to change. A recent increase in human incidences of these CSIs in the Nordic regions might indicate an expansion of the range of ticks and hosts, with vegetation changes acting as potential predictors linked to habitat suitability. In this paper, we study districts in Fennoscandia and Russia where incidences of BOR and TBE have steadily increased over the 1995–2015 period (defined as ’Well Increasing districts’). This selection is taken as a proxy for increasing the prevalence of tick-borne pathogens due to increased habitat suitability for ticks and hosts, thus simplifying the multiple factors that explain incidence variations. This approach allows vegetation types and strengths of correlation s...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research

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In this study, we selected four representative tick species which have different regional distribution foci in mainland China. i.e., Dermacentor marginatus, Dermacentor silvarum, Haemaphysalis longicornis and Ixodes granulatus. We used the MaxEnt model to identify the key environmental factors of tick occurrence and map their potential distributions in 2050 under four combined climate and socioeconomic scenarios (i.e., SSP1-RCP2.6, SSP2-RCP4.5, SSP3-RCP7.0 and SSP5-RCP8.5). We found that the extent of the urban fabric, cropland and forest, temperature annual range and precipitation of the driest month were the main determi...
Source: International Journal for Parasitology - Category: Parasitology Authors: Source Type: research
In this study, we took advantage of the recently compiled spatial dataset of distribution and diversity of ticks in China, analyzed the environmental determinants of ten frequently reported tick species and mapped the spatial distribution of these species over the country using the MaxEnt model. We found that presence of urban fabric, cropland, and forest in a place are key determents of tick occurrence, suggesting ticks were likely inhabited close to where people live. Besides, precipitation in the driest month was found to have a relatively high contribution in mapping tick distribution. The model projected that theses t...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, Ahead of Print.
Source: Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, Ahead of Print.
Source: Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is one of eight zoonoses carried by ticks in Norway (the others are Anaplasmosis, Babesiosis, Louping ill, Lyme borreliosis, Relapsing fever, Rickettsial spotted fever and Tularemia).  As displayed in the following graphs, rates of human TBE are considerably lower than those of other tick-borne diseases in Norway, and below TBE rates reported by neighboring countries. [1-3]     References: Berger S. Infectious Diseases of Norway, 2019. 387 pages , 138 graphs , 858 references. Gideon e-books,  https://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/country/infectious-diseases-of-norway/ Berg...
Source: GIDEON blog - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Graphs ProMED Source Type: blogs
Background: The importance of tick-borne diseases is increasing all over the world, including Georgia. In Georgia, almost only a few TBDs have been reported in animals and men, involving Lyme Borreliosis [LB], tick-borne relapsing fever [TBRF], tick-borne encephalitis [TBE], Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever [CCHF].
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: UMP. 835 Source Type: research
A constant increase in the incidence of tick-borne diseases has been observed in Europe since the last decade of the twentieth century. In Poland, the most common zoonoses transmitted by Ixodes ricinus ticks are tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) and Lyme disease. These diseases have become a serious clinical problem, especially in Podlaskie Region, which is considered an endemic area for these diseases (Czupryna et al., 2011).
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
We present case studies on the role of rodents in the cycles of Bartonella spp., of wild ungulates in the cycle of Babesia spp., and of various wildlife species in the life cycle of Leishmania infantum, Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Rickettsia spp. These examples highlight the usefulness of surveillance strategies focused on neglected zoonotic agents in wildlife as a source of valuable information for health professionals, nature managers and (local) decision-makers. These benefits could be further enhanced by increased collaboration between researchers and stakeholders across Europe and a more harmonised and coordinated a...
Source: Veterinary Parasitology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
Conclusion The TBE increase that occurred in France in 2016 highlights the need to improve our knowledge about the true burden of TBEV infection and subsequent long-term outcomes.
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
Conclusions: The results of detection and attribution studies can inform evidence-based risk management to reduce current, and plan for future, changes in health risks associated with climate change. Gaining a better understanding of the size, timing, and distribution of the climate change burden of disease and injury requires reliable long-term data sets, more knowledge about the factors that confound and modify the effects of climate on health, and refinement of analytic techniques for detection and attribution. At the same time, significant advances are possible in the absence of complete data and statistical certainty:...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
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