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Russian radiation leak: everything you need to know
‘Extremely high’ levels of a radioactive isotope were discovered in parts of Russia in September. But where did it come from? And is it dangerous?Russia reports radioactivity 986 times the norm after nuclear accident claimRussia ’s meteorological service has confirmed that “extremely high” concentrations of a radioactive isotope, ruthenium-106, were found in several parts of the country in late September. Ru-106 is a decay product from nuclear reactions: the initial fuel is typically uranium or plutonium, and this spl its into smaller nucleii, which decay through a series of different radioact...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Russia Nuclear power Nuclear waste Energy Environment Europe Science Physics Source Type: news

Clues In That Mysterious Radioactive Cloud Point Toward Russia
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Geoff Brumfiel Source Type: news

4th high-level plenary session at the first WHO Global Ministerial Conference
Your Excellency Dr Veronika Skvortsova, my dear sister, Minister of Health of the Russian Federation, Esteemed WHO regional directors, honourable ministers, colleagues, ladies and gentlemen, (Source: WHO Director-General speeches)
Source: WHO Director-General speeches - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: director-general [subject], director-general [subject], director-general [subject], tuberculosis [subject], tb, tuberculosis [subject], tb, Speech [doctype] Source Type: news

UN-led ministerial conference in Moscow agrees universal commitment to end tuberculosis
On Friday, 75 ministers announced a landmark agreement to take urgent action to end tuberculosis (TB) by 2030 at the conclusion of a World Health Organization (WHO) conference in Moscow, Russia, on eradicating the world's deadliest infectious disease. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A Leonardo da Vinci Painting Just Sold for $450 Million. Here ’s How Experts Figured Out It Was Real
For a painting worth nearly half a billion dollars, Leonardo da Vinci’s Salvator Mundi is far from perfect. The 500-year-old portrait of Jesus Christ has a shady past that includes ownership by King Charles I, a 160-year disappearing act and a sale for only thousands of dollars just 12 years ago. It is damaged and was heavily repainted, then restored. And at least one prominent da Vinci expert is on record saying he doesn’t believe da Vinci was the primary artist behind it. But the 15-by-17 portrait overcame all of that Wednesday night when it sold at auction to an anonymous buyer for a gob-smacking $450.3 mil...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jennifer Calfas Tags: Uncategorized Art onetime Source Type: news

Angola:Angola Participates in WHO Conference
[ANGOP] Luanda -Angola is participating on Thursday and Friday in the first Ministerial Conference of the World Health Organization (WHO) on Tuberculosis, which is taking place in Moscow, Russia. (Source: AllAfrica News: Tuberculosis)
Source: AllAfrica News: Tuberculosis - November 16, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Namibia:Namibian Student in Russia Does Research On Cardio-Vascular Diseases
[New Era] Anna Katysheva (AK) a reporter for Russia's news portals on science and technologies, Indicator.Ru, interviewed Chase Bassingthwaighte (CB) a Namibian medical student at the Peoples' Friendship University of Russia, which is also known as RUDN University. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 16, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Russian scientist determined the normal content of boron in the human body
This study will provide a better understanding of the role that this important trace element plays in metabolism. The results of the work were presented in the Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Top Dem warns Sessions move could be 'bigger threat to our democracy' than Russia
Rep. Adam Schiff today slammed Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ decision (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - November 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Politics Source Type: news

Short Takes
The 2017 meeting of the AIBS Council of Member Societies and Organizations, Engaging Policymakers: Opportunities for Biological Sciences Organizations, will be held in Washington, DC, on 4 December 2017. AIBS Council Representatives may now register for the meeting. Sam Clovis has withdrawn his nomination to serve as the Department of Agriculture's chief scientist. Clovis is a former Trump campaign official who was recently questioned by the Mueller investigation about what he knew about campaign team members' contacts with Russia. One former campaign aide, George Papadopoulos, has pled guilty to lying to the FBI. Email...
Source: Public Policy Reports - November 14, 2017 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Carbon Pollution Levels Rose for the First Time in Four Years
(WASHINGTON) — Global carbon pollution rose this year after three straight years when levels of the heat-trapping gas didn’t go up at all, scientists reported Monday. Preliminary figures project that worldwide carbon dioxide emissions are up about 2 percent this year, according to an international team of scientists. Most of the increase came from China. The report by the Global Carbon Project team dashed hopes that emissions from the burning of coal, oil and gas had peaked. “We hoped that we had turned the corner… We haven’t,” said study co-author Rob Jackson, an Earth scientist at Sta...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Seth Borenstein / AP Tags: Uncategorized climate change onetime Source Type: news

Health at a Glance 2017
Report presents the most recent comparable data on the health status of populations and health system performance in OECD countries. Where possible, it also reports data for partner countries (Brazil, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, India, Indonesia, Lithuania, Russian Federation and South Africa). The data presented in this publication come from official national statistics.(Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - November 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A Radioactive Cloud from Russia Swept Over Europe — and No One Knows Why
A mysterious radioactive cloud that swept through much of Europe this fall has officials baffled. The cloud was harmless and has dissipated, France’s Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety wrote in a statement Thursday, but between Sept. 27 and Oct. 13, the radioactive nuclide Ruthenium 106 was detected in “the majority of European countries.” Experts aren’t totally sure where the substance came from, though testing suggests it was first released during the last week of September in Russia or Kazakhstan, likely somewhere between Russia’s Volga River and Ural Mountains. &ldquo...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized europe France Nuclear onetime radiaoctive Science Source Type: news

Mysterious Radioactive Cloud Over Europe Hints At Accident Farther East
Ruthenium-106, an artificial isotope, was detected in early October and is now gone. European safety officials say it poses no health risk to residents and that it might have come from Russia.(Image credit: CTBTO/FLICKR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Geoff Brumfiel Source Type: news

Nuclear accident sends 'harmless' radioactive cloud over Europe
French institute says pollution suggests release of nuclear material in Russia or Kazakhstan in SeptemberA cloud of radioactive pollution over Europe in recent weeks indicates that an accident happened in a nuclear facility in Russia or Kazakhstan in the last week of September, the French nuclear safety institute IRSN has said. The IRSN on Thursday ruled out an accident in a nuclear reactor, saying it was likely to be in a nuclear fuel treatment site or centre for radioactive medicine. There has been no impact on human health or the environment in Europe, it said.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 10, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample and Kim Willsher Tags: Russia Europe World news Kazakhstan South and Central Asia Nuclear power Energy Environment Source Type: news

Nitric oxide: Experimental analysis of its role in brain tissue in simulated ischemia
(Pensoft Publishers) A joint study conducted by scientists at the National Academy of Sciences in Belarus and Kazan Federal University in Russia, looks at the role of nitric oxide (NO) in brain tissue in simulated ischemia in rats. The study seeks to cast light on NO as a signalling molecule in a modeled ischemic and hemorrhagic insult. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Russian chemists discovered a surprising effect of a well-known leukemia drug
(RUDN University) Researchers from RUDN University and Institute of Biomedical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences have identified an alternative mechanism for the effective antitumor drug -- an enzyme called L-asparaginase. Some isoenzymes of L-asparaginase block the growth of telomeres (region of repetitive nucleotide sequences at each end of a chromosome) on DNA molecules, and this limits the number of divisions of a cancer cell. This effect is reported in the Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers offer new information warfare model
(Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology) Russian experts managed to define the mechanism of the very manipulation of the minds of the masses. Mathematics brought a number of formulas that describe the behavior of participants of the information war that allows you to determine the next steps of media propaganda. The model that researchers developed can help to accurately predict the outcome of media battle. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ensuring Europe's nuclear fuel supply
Energy security is getting a boost from EU-funded research on an alternative, European supply of the fuel assemblies used in Russian-made nuclear reactors. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - November 9, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Mozambique:Russia Debt-for-Development Initiative to Support School Meals in Mozambique
[WFP] In addition to providing debt relief for Mozambique, the initiative will free up new resources for development and support expansion of the Programa Nacional de Alimenta ção Escolar (National School Feeding Programme), which seeks to provide school meals across all primary schools in Mozambique. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 8, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Six Russians locked into 'spacecraft' for 17 days in moon flight simulation
The three men and three women are the first group in a programme which will see teams spend up to a year in isolationThree men and three women were sealed in an artificial spacecraft unit in Moscow on Tuesday in a simulation of a 17-day flight to the moon, a preparation for long-term missions.The experiment is the first of several in the Sirius (Scientific International Research In a Unique terrestrial Station) programme, which over the course of five years will gradually increase the isolation experiment to 365 days.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 8, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Agence France-Presse Tags: Russia Space The moon Europe Science World news Source Type: news

Participants from across Russia and beyond gather for the third Cochrane Workshop in Kazan
Cochrane Austria,Cochrane Russia, andCochrane Sweden joined forces to  deliver a truly International Cochrane event on evidence-based medicine, held in Kazan at the end of October. The successful workshop took place over two days and focused on review production software. It marked the third Cochrane workshop held in Russia to date.The Vice Rector for Innovation, Andrey Artemyev, officially opened the workshop and gave a warm welcome to participants on behalf of the Rector of Kazan Federal University, Ilshat Gafurov.The theme of the workshop was   'Cochrane systematic reviews: from protocol to review - logistics ...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - November 6, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Did you solve it? Secrets of Russian intelligence
The solutions to today ’s puzzlesEarlier today on my puzzle blog I set you the following puzzles:1.Find a solution to the equationContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 6, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Science Mathematics Source Type: news

Can you solve it? Secrets of Russian intelligence
Three puzzles that came in from the coldHi guzzlers,Every day we read stories concerning the prowess of Russian hackers. But why are they so good? A clue may lie in the fact that Russia has long excelled in maths outreach, which has been instrumental in creating a supply of people with the right skills. More of this later. Meanwhile, here are three puzzles with Russian origins.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 6, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Mathematics Science Source Type: news

Russia starts production of orthophosphoric acid based on phosphorus-32
(Tomsk Polytechnic University) Tomsk Polytechnic University commissioned the Russia's only production of orthophosphoric acid based on phosphorus-32 which is used for biochemical study, diagnostics and therapy of cancer diseases. Prior to its launch in Tomsk, Russian consumers, particularly scientific research and medical centers, were forced to purchase the radiopharmaceutical abroad. The capacity of the entire production line is approximately 100 gigabecquerels per month. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 3, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Chemists have created compounds that can treat glaucoma
(RUDN University) Glaucoma is a serious disease associated with increased intraocular pressure which often leads to blindness. One of the ways to treat glaucoma is to reduce aqueous humour secretion in the ciliary body of the eye by suppressing (inhibiting) activity of special enzymes -- carbonic anhydrases. Russian scientists from RUDN University have designed new compounds that can effectively reduce intraocular pressure by isoform selective inhibiting human carbonic anhydrase. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 3, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Science can align common interests among the world's leading superpowers
(Tufts University) International scientific collaboration in the Arctic can help align common interests among countries experiencing geopolitical conflict, including the United States and Russia, according to a team of scientists and educators led by a professor at The Fletcher School of Law& Diplomacy at Tufts University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 3, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

On Thin Ice: Walruses Threatened After U.S. Declines To List As Endangered
The Trump administration refused last month to put the Pacific walrus on the endangered species list, spelling a "death sentence" for the species that lives in the seas between Alaska and Russia.(Image credit: S.A. Sonsthagen/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Samantha Raphelson Source Type: news

Ex-Trump Campaign Aide Withdraws From Nomination Amid Questions In DOJ Russia Probe
Sam Clovis, who helped run Donald Trump's campaign in 2016, has been pulled into the imbroglio over last year's interference by Russia in U.S. politics and elections.(Image credit: Charlie Neibergall/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Philip Ewing Source Type: news

Ex-Trump Campaign Official Withdraws From Nomination Amid Questions In Russia Probe
Sam Clovis, who had been tapped for a USDA post, has been pulled into the imbroglio over last year's interference by Russia in U.S. politics and elections.(Image credit: Charlie Neibergall/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Philip Ewing Source Type: news

Trump's USDA Pick With Ties To Russia Investigation Withdraws Nomination
Sam Clovis was poised to become the USDA's chief scientist, despite having no science background. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 2, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Husky Announces New Customer for Integrated Medical Systems in Russia
Order sees Pascal Medical install 12 Husky systems for medical applications BOLTON, Ontario– Husky Injection Molding Systems, a leading industrial technology provider to the plastics processing community, today announced a strategic win with Pascal Medical, who has purchased and installed twelve Husky systems. Pascal Medical has chosen Husky to be its partner in the creation of an innovative, technologically advanced product complex for the manufacture of sterile, disposable medical...This story is related to the following:Medical Equipment& Supplies (Source: Industrial Newsroom - Health, Medical and Dental Supplies)
Source: Industrial Newsroom - Health, Medical and Dental Supplies - November 2, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Source Type: news

Scientists of SibFU have found a way to determine the toxicity of nanomaterials
(Siberian Federal University) Official website of the Russian Science Foundation reports that a group of scientists from Siberian Federal University and Krasnoyarsk Scientific Center of the SB RAS has developed a bioluminescent enzymatic test system for assessing the toxicity of carbon nanomaterials. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What mitigates the consequences of recession for companies?
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) Experts of the Higher School of Economics (HSE) demonstrated that companies with foreign ownership have an easier time overcoming the consequences of economic recessions. The results of the study were presented in the paper 'Lean against the wind: The moderation effect of foreign investments during the economic recession in Russia' published by the Journal of Economics and Business: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0148619517300413. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Russia's MD Medical says no new share sale if price below $12
MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russia's MD Medical Group will not proceed with a secondary public offering if the shares cannot fetch at least $12, Mark Kurtser, its main shareholder and chief executive, told Reuters. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Russia set to test ballistic missile that could "obliterate an area the size of France"
(Natural News) While North Korea has become the primary focus of all things relating to nuclear warfare, Russia has been preparing to test-launch its newest and biggest ever nuclear missile. The so-called “Satan 2” is a 100-ton intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) that has been under construction since 2009 and is ready to be tested by... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

MSU biologists discovered the pathways of groups of the lophophore
(Lomonosov Moscow State University) Scientists from Moscow State University have proved that lophophorates -- the invertebrates with special tentacular apparatus -- are relatives. Scientists have examined some representatives of one of the phylum of this group. The results were published in BMC Evolutionary Biology. The study was carried out within the framework of the 'Animals' branch of the Noah's Ark project supported by a grant from the Russian Science Foundation (RNF). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 31, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Prevalence, circumstances and consequences of non-fatal road traffic injuries and other bodily injuries among older people in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, Russia and South Africa - Peltzer K, Phaswana-Mafuya N, Arokiasamy P, Biritwum R, Yawson A, Minicuci N, Williams JS, Kowal P, Chatterji S.
Unintentional injuries are one of the main contributors to mortality and disability in elderly populations in low- and middle-income countries. The aim of this study was to examine the annual road traffic and other bodily (not including falls) injury preva... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Former Democratic President Jimmy Carter confirms: Russians didn't steal the election
(Natural News) Americans have been lied to for a year now by the extreme political Left that somehow, some way, Russia “stole the election” from Hillary Clinton, even “colluding” with the campaign of Donald J. Trump to do so. It’s a lie that has never been proven, mind you, but it’s been told so many... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Soviet submarine officer who averted nuclear war honoured with prize
Vasili Arkhipov, who prevented escalation of the cold war by refusing to launch a nuclear torpedo against US forces, is to be awarded new ‘Future of Life’ prizeA senior officer of a Soviet submarine who averted the outbreak of nuclear conflict during the cold war is to be honoured with a new prize, 55 years to the day after his heroic actions averted global catastrophe.On 27 October 1962, Vasili Alexandrovich Arkhipov was on board the Soviet submarine B-59 near Cuba when the US forces began dropping non-lethal depth charges. While the action was designed to encourage the Soviet submarines to surface, the crew o...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Science prizes Nuclear weapons Cold war Cuba Americas Russia Source Type: news

Yes, the Russian dossier story is a VERY big deal and here’s why
(Natural News) As expected, there has been the formation of a partisan divide in Washington, D.C. after reports published this week revealed that two-time failed Democratic presidential contender Hillary Clinton and the Democratic National Committee paid for the infamous “Trump dossier,” which alleged big-time collusion between the president’s campaign team and the Russian government. For... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Beyond Genghis Khan: how looting threatens to erase Mongolia's history
Mongolia ’s cold, dry climate can result in incredible archaeological finds, but a harsh economic downturn means looting has risen to disastrous levelsIt ’s a sunny, late summer day in northern Mongolia’s Darkhad Basin – a large glacial lake basin nestled against the country’s Russian border. To the south stretch the grasslands of the Eastern Eurasian Steppe; to the north, the Siberian boreal forest. We stand – almost precisely – at the p lace they meet, at the forest’s edge overlooking a large, grassy valley the administrative district of Ulaan Uul. We’ve come to this ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 26, 2017 Category: Science Authors: William Taylor Tags: Archaeology Science Mongolia Heritage Culture Source Type: news

Why insects can develop from unfertilized egg cells
(Lomonosov Moscow State University) A scientist from the Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Biology, has, together with his Russian colleague, explained frequent occurrence of parthenogenesis -- development of organisms from unfertilized egg cells -- in insects. Studying this phenomenon is needed to successfully control species that cause damage to agriculture. The results were published in the Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 26, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers greenlight gas detection at room temperature
(Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology) Russian researchers proposed sensors capable of operating at room temperature. Their new nanocomposite sensors are based on zinc and indium oxides, and their efficiency is maximized by green light illumination. The proposed device could be used to detect combustible, explosive, or poisonous substances in the atmosphere even at low concentrations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 26, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

MSLs: The Superheroes of Pharma?
The Medical Science Liaison (MSL) has come a long way in a short time. While pharma never stands still for long, the need for scientifically credible partners to help customers understand the growing complexity of new medicines and navigate the choppy waters of real-world evidence and health outcomes, has seen the MSL come to the fore in ways few might have imagined.While the core competencies of the MSL remain unchanged, new capabilities will be needed – both for MSLs and MSL leaders – to meet the demands of the changing roles. But what does the modern MSL look like and what skills will they need now and in th...
Source: EyeForPharma - October 25, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Lucy Fulford Source Type: news

BIOCAD enters the European market
The largest Russian biotechnology company BIOCAD plans to enter the European market with oncological and autoimmune medicines. So far, there are seven molecules in the European portfolio of BIOCAD. This are innovative and biosimilar products, which could be used in treatment of melanoma, breast, stomach, kidney and lung cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and multiple sclerosis. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - October 25, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Business Business and Industry Source Type: news

PHR Condemns Russian Veto on Syria Chemical Weapons Investigation
Physicians for Human Rights (PHR) today condemned Russia ’s veto of a draft United Nations Security Council resolution extending the mandate of an investigative group looking into multiple chemical weapons attacks in Syria. The Joint Investigative Mechanism, established by the Council to look into who committed those attacks, is scheduled to release a r eport this week on the chemical attack that killed dozens of people in the Syrian town of Khan Sheikhoun in April 2017. (Source: PHR Press Releases)
Source: PHR Press Releases - October 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lack of International Action on Rohingya Crisis Called a “Disgrace”
By Tharanga YakupitiyageUNITED NATIONS, Oct 23 2017 (IPS)As the crisis in Myanmar reaches unprecedented levels, frustration is at its peak as the international community remains slow to respond and act cohesively. Over 600,000 Rohingya refugees have crossed into Bangladesh since the renewal of violence on August 25, making it the fastest-growing refugee emergency in the world.Idriss Jazairy. Credit: UN Photo/Eskinder DebebeThe UN warns that up to one million—representing the entire Muslim population of Rakhine state—could flee to the neighboring nation by the end of the year if the crisis continues.Rohingya ref...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tharanga Yakupitiyage Tags: Aid Asia-Pacific Crime & Justice Gender Gender Violence Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Indigenous Rights Migration & Refugees Religion TerraViva United Nations Women's Health Source Type: news