COVID-19 induces proatherogenic alterations in moderate to severe non-comorbid patients: A single-center observational study

Blood Cells Mol Dis. 2021 Sep 9;92:102604. doi: 10.1016/j.bcmd.2021.102604. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTPatients with COVID-19 can be asymptomatic or present mild to severe symptoms, leading to respiratory and cardiovascular complications and death. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and obesity are considered risk factors for COVID-19 poor prognosis. In parallel, COVID-19 severe patients exhibit dyslipidemia and alterations in neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) associated with disease severity and mortality. To investigate whether such alterations are caused by the infection or results from preexisting comorbidities, this work analyzed dyslipidemia and the hemogram profile of COVID-19 patients according to the severity and compared with patients without T2DM or obesity comorbidities. Dyslipidemia, with a marked decrease in HDL levels, and increased NLR accompanied the disease severity, even in non-T2DM and non-obese patients, indicating that COVID-19 causes the observed alterations. Because decreased hemoglobin is involved in COVID-19 severity, and hemoglobin concentration is associated with metabolic diseases, the erythrogram of patients was also evaluated. We verified a drop in hemoglobin and erythrocyte number in severe patients, independently of T2DM and obesity, which may explain in part the need for artificial ventilation in severe cases. Thus, the control of such parameters (especially HDL levels, NLR, and hemoglobin concentration) could be a good strategy to prevent...
Source: Blood Cells, Molecules and Diseases - Category: Hematology Authors: Source Type: research

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World J Gastroenterol. 2021 Sep 7;27(33):5502-5519. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v27.i33.5502.ABSTRACTMetabolic diseases are highly prevalent worldwide and have been associated with adverse clinical outcomes, including mortality, in patients developing coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Because of the close relationship between metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity and the presence of metabolic-associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD), a high number of cases of patients affected by both MAFLD and COVID-19 would be expected, especially in high-risk populations. Some studies have shown an increased risk of adverse c...
Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Source Type: research
Blood Cells Mol Dis. 2021 Sep 9;92:102604. doi: 10.1016/j.bcmd.2021.102604. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTPatients with COVID-19 can be asymptomatic or present mild to severe symptoms, leading to respiratory and cardiovascular complications and death. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and obesity are considered risk factors for COVID-19 poor prognosis. In parallel, COVID-19 severe patients exhibit dyslipidemia and alterations in neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) associated with disease severity and mortality. To investigate whether such alterations are caused by the infection or results from preexisting comorbidities, thi...
Source: Blood Cells, Molecules and Diseases - Category: Hematology Authors: Source Type: research
Eur J Endocrinol. 2021 Sep 1:EJE-21-0721.R1. doi: 10.1530/EJE-21-0721. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTIn this SARS-COV2-pandemic, diabetes mellitus soon emerged as one of the most prominent risk factors for a severe course of COVID-19 and increased mortality due to hyperglycemia/insulin resistance, obesity, inflammation, altered immune status and cardiovascular complications. In general, men are at a higher risk of severe or fatal COVID-19 disease irrespective of age, region and despite comparable infection rates in both sexes. In COVID-19, there is also a male predominance among hospitalised patients with diabetes, however...
Source: European Journal of Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Source Type: research
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