Maternal Obesity Tied to NAFLD in Offspring Maternal Obesity Tied to NAFLD in Offspring

Pregnant women with obesity are more likely than normal-weight pregnant women to have children who develop nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, a Swedish study suggests.Reuters Health Information
Source: Medscape Gastroenterology Headlines - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Gastroenterology News Source Type: news

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ConclusionsThe prevalence of NAFLD is high in women with prior GDM. Such women also have a high burden of cardiometabolic risk factors. Future studies should evaluate the intermediate and long ‐term hepatic and cardiovascular risk, and the impact of lifestyle interventions in reducing morbidity in such women.
Source: Journal of Diabetes Investigation - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most common pediatric liver disease. The intrauterine and early life environment can have an important impact on the long-term metabolic health. We investigated the impact of maternal pre-pregnancy obesity, (pre)gestational diabetes, breastfeeding and birth anthropometrics/preterm birth on the development of NAFLD in children and adolescents.
Source: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionMaternal type 1 diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of several metabolic complications and neurobehavioral disorders in the offspring. Increased attention for long-term complications in this population is needed. Further research is needed to evaluate whether improved glycemic control in pregnancy can reduce these long-term complications.
Source: Acta Diabetologica - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Conclusion: It seems that the probiotic products could have beneficial effects as an adjunct therapy for care and management of obesity when used in high dose. However, due to heterogeneity of included studies, it is required to confirm our results by more meta-analyses of clinical trials. PMID: 33552218 [PubMed]
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
We read with interest the article “Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in pregnancy is associated with adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes” published in the September 2020 issue of Journal of Hepatology.1 As the tertiary referral centre for obstetric care in Western Australia, we have seen increasing rates of maternal obesity and the associated complication of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) over the last decade.
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
ConclusionsThe prevalence of NAFLD is high in women with prior GDM. Such women also have a high burden of cardiometabolic risk factors. Future studies should evaluate the intermediate and long ‐term hepatic and cardiovascular risk, and the impact of lifestyle interventions in reducing morbidity in such women.
Source: Journal of Diabetes Investigation - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Abstract Nutritional supplementations are a form of nutrition sources that may help in improving health complexities throughout the life span of a person. Under the umbrella of food supplementations, nutraceuticals are products extracted from edible sources that provide medical benefits along with primary nutritional value, these can be considered as functional foods. These nutraceutical supplementations are also evidenced in altering the commensal gut microbiota and help to prevent or fight against chronic non-communicable degenerative diseases in adults including neurological disorders (Autism Spectrum Disorder ...
Source: Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tags: Curr Pharm Biotechnol Source Type: research
Excess dietary fructose is a major public health concern (1–4). Evidence shows increased fructose intake can cause insulin resistance, hepatic de novo lipogenesis, hypertriglyceridemia, obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (5–9). However, little is known about the effects of fructose during pregnancy and its influence on offspring development and predisposition to later-life disease. To determine whether moderately increased maternal fructose intake could have health consequences on offspring, we have investigated the effects of 10% w/v fructose water intake during preconception and pregnancy. ...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: We found that maternal OWOB status is related to fatty liver content in the offspring as young adults, even after taking into account OWOB status and lifestyle factors in the offspring. PMID: 32145139 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: BJOG : An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: BJOG Source Type: research
In conclusion, all above mechanisms appear to intervene synergistically and may act as modifiable risk factors for infant and mother NAFLD. PMID: 31969089 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Current Pharmaceutical Design - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Pharm Des Source Type: research
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