Gambling in patients with major depressive disorder is associated with an elevated risk of Suicide: Insights from 12-years of Nationwide inpatient sample data

Addict Behav. 2021 Feb 16;118:106872. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2021.106872. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTBACKGROUND: There is a frequent occurrence of gambling disorder (GD) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Psychiatric comorbidities can present more severely in patients diagnosed with pathological gambling. There is limited information on symptom trends in MDD patients with GD, particularly in association with suicidality.OBJECTIVES: Our primary aim was to compare baseline characteristics in MDD patients with and without a GD diagnosis. The secondary aim was to assess the rate of suicidality (suicidal ideation/attempt) between groups and evaluate any predictors that may be associated with an increased risk of suicidal behavior. In addition, we also assessed the variation in gambling trends in MDD patients over several years.METHODS: Data for the study were obtained retrospectively from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) dataset for the years 2006-2017. Our primary patient cohort was composed of patients age ≥ 18 years; admitted to the hospital with a primary diagnosis of MDD and a secondary diagnosis of GD. For baseline characteristics and suicidality, we compared these patients to MDD patients without a GD diagnosis. In addition, we also assessed the trends of baseline characteristics in MDD patients with GD over the years.RESULTS: A total of 6646 patients were included in the MDD with GD group, and compared with 4,021,063 MDD patients without a GD diagn...
Source: Addictive Behaviors - Category: Addiction Authors: Source Type: research

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Although James Toussaint has never had COVID-19, the pandemic is taking a profound toll on his health. First, the 57-year-old lost his job delivering parts for a New Orleans auto dealership in spring 2020, when the local economy shut down. Then, he fell behind on his rent. Last month, Toussaint was forced out of his apartment when his landlord—who refused to accept federally funded rental assistance—found a loophole in the federal ban on evictions. Toussaint has recently had trouble controlling his blood pressure. Arthritis in his back and knees prevents him from lifting more than 20 pounds, a huge obstacle for...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Binge Eating Disorders Eating Disorders General Not Crazy Podcast Source Type: blogs
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Source: Cadernos de Saude Publica - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Cad Saude Publica Source Type: research
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Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Addiction Health Health care disparities Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
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Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: alcohol CDC drug overdose Heidi Schoomaker Howard K. Koh JAMA Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 middle-aged adults Steven Woolf suicide U.S. life expectancy young adults Source Type: research
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Addiction diabetes Mental Health/Psychology neuroscience Source Type: news
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Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Bullying Children and Teens College Parenting Sexuality Substance Abuse Children At Risk Teen Depression Teen Drug Use Source Type: blogs
By ROMAN ZAMISHKA In the final act of Shakespeare’s Richard III, the eponymous villain king arrives on the battlefield to fight against Richmond, who will soon become Henry VII. During the battle, Richard is dismounted as his horse is killed and in a mad frenzy wades through the battlefield screaming “A horse, a horse! My kingdom for a horse!” Richard shows us how market value can change drastically depending on the circumstances, or your mental state, and even the most absurd exchange rate can become reasonable in a moment of crisis. This presumably arbitrary nature of prices should be the first t...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Economics Free Market health economics Libertarian Source Type: blogs
By ROMAN ZAMISHKA In the final act of Shakespeare’s Richard III the eponymous villain king arrives on the battlefield to fight against Richmond, who will soon become Henry VII. During the battle Richard is dismounted as his horse is killed and in a mad frenzy wades through the battlefield screaming “A horse, a horse! My kingdom for a horse!” Richard shows us how market value can change drastically depending on the circumstances, or your mental state, and even the most absurd exchange rate can become reasonable in a moment of crisis. This presumably arbitrary nature of prices should be the first thi...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Economics Source Type: blogs
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