Visual hallucinations and sight loss in children and young adults: a retrospective case series of Charles Bonnet syndrome.

Visual hallucinations and sight loss in children and young adults: a retrospective case series of Charles Bonnet syndrome. Br J Ophthalmol. 2020 Sep 15;: Authors: Jones L, Moosajee M Abstract BACKGROUND/AIMS: Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is a complication of sight loss affecting all ages; yet, few childhood cases have been reported. Our aim is to raise awareness of this under-reported association occurring in children and young adults in order to prevent psychological harm in this age group. METHODS: A retrospective case series reviewing medical notes of patients
Source: The British Journal of Ophthalmology - Category: Opthalmology Authors: Tags: Br J Ophthalmol Source Type: research

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