Effects of deep neuromuscular block on surgical workspace conditions in laparoscopic bariatric surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

CONCLUSIONS: It was found that dNMB helps improve surgical space conditions in patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery whereas it fails to shorten procedure duration. More high-quality large-sampled RCTs are needed to confirm these results. The relationship between dNMB use and other clinical outcomes, such as complications occurrence, needs to be further investigated. PMID: 32251573 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Minerva Anestesiologica - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Minerva Anestesiol Source Type: research

Related Links:

ConclusionAccording to this study data, bariatric surgery reduces the need for INI in patients with OA. The effect seems to be related to the amount of weight loss. Additional studies conducted on a larger scale are necessary to validate findings.
Source: Surgical Endoscopy - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
We read with great interest the recent article by Wong et al. [1] titled “Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block with liposomal bupivacaine and its effect on opiate use after weight loss surgery: a randomized controlled trial”. This long awaited well-designed study compared laparoscopic-guided TAP block (L-TAP) with liposomal bupivacaine, L-TAP with regular bupivaca ine, and no block in patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery. In line with a recent randomized trial, no difference was found between liposomal and regular bupivacaine in terms of postoperative pain scores and opioid consumption [2].
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
ConclusionCandy cane syndrome is a rare and challenging complication reported in bariatric patients following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and is best investigated with a barium swallow or oesophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (OGD). This means that this kind of pathology could be avoided by not leaving such a long blind loop during the primary gastric bypass operation. An explorative laparoscopy could be performed in the event of abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting at a long-term follow-up after gastric bypass. Even if there are little data regarding the efficacy of surgical treatment, if present, “candy cane” surgical r...
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
In this meta-analysis, Hamid et  al. [1] discuss a subset of the currently available data on the impact of transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block on postoperative pain and opioid consumption. In the era of protocols to enhance recovery this is a worthy endeavor. The Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Impro vement Decreasing Readmissions Through Opportunities Provided program, described in 2014 by Morton [2], was the first QI initiative to originate from this accreditation program.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Editorial comment Source Type: research
In this meta-analysis, Hamid et al[1] discuss a subset of the currently available data on the impact of transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block on postoperative pain and opioid consumption. In the era of protocols to enhance recovery this is a worthy endeavor. The MBSAQIP D.R.O.P program (Decreasing Readmissions Through Opportunities Provided), described in 2014 by John Morton, was the first QI initiative to originate from this accreditation program [2]. Notably, the DROP program originated from a desire to decrease readmissions, and postoperative pain was not one of the author ’s proposed causes for readmission.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
We read with interest the article “Effect of Intraperitoneal Bupivacaine on Postoperative Pain in Laparoscopic Bariatric Surgeries” [1]. We thank and congratulate the Iranian colleagues for this important contribution to this topic. Even if supported by scarce literature, effectiveness of peritoneal irrigation with local anesthe tics still remains controversial [2], although it seems to be one useful tool to control postoperative pain after bariatric surgery, as recently stated by a meta-analysis published within your Journal [3].
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
We read with interest the article “Effect of intraperitoneal bupivacaine on postoperative pain in laparoscopic bariatric surgeries” [1]. We thank and congratulate the Iranian colleagues for this important contribution to this topic. Even if supported by scarce literature, effectiveness of peritoneal irrigation with local anesthe tics still remains controversial [2], although it seems to be one useful tool to control postoperative pain after bariatric surgery, as recently stated by a meta-analysis published within your journal [3].
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Bariatric surgery was associated with greater risk of CPOU incidence in patients without baseline CPOU but was not associated with greater CPOU persistence. PMID: 32507657 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases : official journal of the American Society for Bariatric Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Surg Obes Relat Dis Source Type: research
Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a form of regional anesthesia that has been increasingly employed in minimally invasive surgery. The data regarding its use in laparoscopic bariatric surgery, however, are still limited and at times controversial.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Review article Source Type: research
Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a form of regional anesthesia that has been increasingly employed in minimally invasive surgery. The data regarding its use in laparoscopic bariatric surgery however is still limited and at times controversial.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
More News: Anesthesiology | Bariatric Surgery | Brain | Databases & Libraries | Eating Disorders & Weight Management | Laparoscopy | Neurology | Neurosurgery | Obesity | Pain | Study