Obesity is an initiator of colon adenomas but not a promoter of colorectal cancer in the Black Women ’s Health Study

ConclusionOur results suggest that obesity might be an initiator for colon adenomas but not a promoter for colorectal cancer among Black women.
Source: Cancer Causes and Control - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research

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Prediabetes is associated with a high risk of colon cancer, and abdominal obesity, which can result in the secretion of several obesity-related adipocytokines, is an independent influencing factor for colonic ...
Source: BMC Endocrine Disorders - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 28 December 2019Source: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Molecular Basis of DiseaseAuthor(s): Snahlata Singh, Shyamananda Singh Mayengbam, Surbhi Chouhan, Bhavana Deshmukh, Pranay Ramteke, Dipti Athavale, Manoj Kumar BhatAbstractEpidemiological studies over the last few decades have shown a strong influence of obesity on colon cancer risk and its progression. These studies have primarily focussed on the role of adipokines in driving cancer progression. We investigated the incidence of cancerous polyp formation and tumor progression in presence and absence of functional leptin along w...
Source: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) Molecular Basis of Disease - Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: research
Conclusions The current review reports recent epidemiological and experimental data supporting the bright future of dietary polyphenols as chemopreventive, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, and anticancer agents in CRC (Figure 1). The polyphenol-rich diet not only may represent a chemopreventive treatment but also has important function on immune system by promoting symbiont and commensal bacterial populations, increases reciprocal interaction between host and microbiota which in turn have important effects on immune function Evidence underlines the use of polyphenols as sensitizers of chemo/radiotherapies paving the w...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
This study analyzed data from women over 40 and compared the size of breast cancers at the time of diagnosis detected in the 1970s (before mammography became common) with the size of tumors detected between 2000 and 2002, when screening mammography was routine. Treatments and rates of death due to breast cancer 10 years after the diagnosis were also analyzed. The study found that: As more women underwent routine screening mammograms, more small breast cancers were detected. Many of these tumors were restricted to the ducts within the breast (called ductal carcinoma in situ), and even without treatment would never threaten...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Source Type: blogs
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling Let us sing the praises of good medical screening tests. These are the tests that can detect medical problems before they become untreatable and before they cause complications or even death. Even better are those screening tests that detect “predisease” — abnormalities that aren’t dangerous on their own but can lead to problems later. According to the US Preventive Services Task Force, relatively few screening tests are considered good enough to routinely recommend for adults, including mammography for breast cancer (women) Pap smear for cervical cancer (women) b...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Cancer Health Prevention Screening Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsBoth gallbladder polyps and gallbladder stones were associated with an increased risk of colorectal adenomas in men but not in women. Gender difference was significant for the association between gallbladder lesions and colorectal polyps.
Source: Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
The Growing Toll of Our Ever-Expanding WaistlinesBy  JANE E. BRODY NOV. 13, 2017Paul Rogers I hope you ’re not chomping on a bagel or, worse, a doughnut while you read about what is probably the most serious public health irony of the last half century in this country: As one major killer — smoking — declined, another rose precipitously to take its place: obesity.Many cancer deaths were averted after millions quit lighting up, but they are now rising because even greater numbers are unable to keep their waistlines in check.Today, obesity and smoking remain the two leading causes of pre...
Source: Dr Portnay - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: The burden of overweight- and obesity-related cancer is high in the United States. Incidence rates of overweight- and obesity-related cancers except colorectal cancer have increased in some age groups and states. IMPLICATIONS FOR PUBLIC HEALTH PRACTICE: The burden of overweight- and obesity-related cancers might be reduced through efforts to prevent and control overweight and obesity. Comprehensive cancer control strategies, including use of evidence-based interventions to promote healthy weight, could help decrease the incidence of these cancers in the United States. PMID: 28981482 [PubMed - in process]
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep Source Type: research
ConclusionsBoth gallbladder polyps and gallbladder stones were associated with an increased risk of colorectal adenomas in males but not in females. Gender difference was significant for the association between gallbladder lesions and colorectal polyps.
Source: Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Our results thus suggest that fidarestat could be used as a potential chemopreventive drug for intestinal cancers due to APC gene mutations. PMID: 28786349 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Current Cancer Drug Targets - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Curr Cancer Drug Targets Source Type: research
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