Omega-3 fats do not protect against cancer

(University of East Anglia) Omega-3 fats do not protect against cancer -- according to new University of East Anglia research. Increased consumption of omega-3 fats is widely promoted globally because of a common belief that it will protect against, or even reverse, diseases such as cancer, heart attacks and stroke. But two systematic reviews find that omega-3 supplements may slightly reduce coronary heart disease mortality and events, but slightly increase risk of prostate cancer. Both beneficial and harmful effects are small.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 24 May 2020Source: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation MedicineAuthor(s): Maira Jaqueline da Cunha, Katia Daniele Rech, Ana Paula Salazar, Aline Souza Pagnussat
Source: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine - Category: Rehabilitation Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 24 May 2020Source: Journal of Vascular and Interventional RadiologyAuthor(s): Kasey Halsey, Jing Wu, Chang Su, Ben Hsieh, Thomas Yi, Scott A. Collins, Benjamin Kimia, Paul J. Zhang, Terrance Healey, Zishu Zhang, Harrison X. Bai
Source: Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 24 May 2020Source: European Journal of RadiologyAuthor(s): Lisa Loi, Ferdinand Zimmermann, Steffen Goerke, Andreas Korzowski, Jan-Eric Meissner, Katerina Deike-Hofmann, Anne Stieber, Peter Bachert, Mark Edward Ladd, Heinz-Peter Schlemmer, Sebastian Bickelhaupt, Sarah Schott, Daniel Paech
Source: European Journal of Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
ConclusionThe proposed multiparametric MRI-based SLICs+MTh method performs noninvasive assessment of NACT response in osteosarcoma that may improve cancer treatment monitoring, planning, and overall prognosis.Key Points• The simple linear iterative clustering supervoxels and Otsu multithresholding-based technique (SLICs+MTh) successfully estimates the proportion of necrosis, viable tumor, and edema in osteosarcoma in the course of chemotherapy.• The proposed technique is noninvasive and uses multiparametric MRI to measure necrosis as an indication of anticancer treatment response.• SLICs+MTh-based necrosis w...
Source: European Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
ConclusionsThe e-ASPECTS software generates robust values for e-ASPECTS and acute infarct volumes when using ST ≤ 4 mm with ST = 1 mm yielding the best performance for predicting baseline stroke severity and clinical outcome after 90 days.Key Points•Clinical utility of automatically derived ASPECTS from computed tomography scans was shown in patients with acute ischemic stroke and treatment with mechanical thrombectomy.•Thin slices (=  1 mm) had the highest clinical utility in comparison with thicker slices (2–10 mm) by having the strongest correlation...
Source: European Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 25 May 2020Source: Personality and Individual DifferencesAuthor(s): Dean Fido, Nadja Heym, Claire A.J. Bloxsom, Kirsty A. Hunter, Michael Gregson, Alexander Sumich
Source: Personality and Individual Differences - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Amid the frustration and despair associated with rising premiums, healthcare costs and obesity prevalence, is a trend that is slowly infiltrating the healthcare industry. Although some of the most notable trends (in fitness and nutrition) tend to come and go as quickly as a fastball (World Series, anyone?), this particular trend has an immense amount of staying power based on current scientific research. This immense power has little to do with pharmacological interventions and prescription refills and much more to do with our feet, forks, fingers and minds. This trend, as written in a recent article by the influential and...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Abstract Red meat (beef, veal, pork, lamb and mutton) consumption contributes several important nutrients to the diet, for example essential amino acids, vitamins (including B12) and minerals (including iron and zinc). Processed red meat (ham, sausages, bacon, frankfurters, salami, etc.) undergoes treatment (curing, smoking, salting or the use of chemical preservatives and additives) to improve its shelf life and/or taste. During recent decades, consumption of red meat has been increasing globally, especially in developing countries. At the same time, there has been growing evidence that high consumption of red meat, espec...
Source: Journal of Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
This study included 1278 patients with prostate cancer in the study group and 1278 subjects without prostate cancer in the comparison group. Each patient was individually tracked for a 3‐year period to identify those who had subsequently received a diagnosis of CHD. The results showed that the incidence rate of CHD during the 3‐year follow‐up period was 4.69 (95% CI: 2.99–5.48) per 100 person‐years and 2.67 (95% CI: 2.15–3.27) per 100 person‐years for the study and comparison cohort, respectively. The Cox proportional hazard regression showed that the hazard ratio for CHD during the 3‐year follow‐...
Source: Andrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Unequal health care continues to be a serious problem for black Americans. More than a decade after the Institute of Medicine issued a landmark report showing that minority patients were less likely to receive the same quality health care as white patients, racial and ethnic disparities continue to plague the U.S. health care system. That report, which was published in 2002, indicated that even when both groups had similar insurance or the same ability to pay for care, black patients received inferior treatment to white patients. This still hold true, according to our investigation into dozens of studies about black health...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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