Psyllium (Plantago ovata Forsk): From evidence of health benefits to its food application

Publication date: Available online 14 December 2019Source: Trends in Food Science &TechnologyAuthor(s): Elisangela Aparecida Nazario Franco, Ana Sanches-Silva, Regiane Ribeiro-Santos, Nathália Ramos de MeloAbstractBackgroundFiber intake has been associated with a lower risk of developing various chronic diseases such as metabolic diseases (e.g. obesity, diabetes, dyslipidemia). In this line, psyllium presents a high content of soluble fiber, associated with health benefits.Scope and approachThe aim of this review is to evaluate the scientific evidence of psyllium health benefits. The nutritional properties of psyllium are presented, as well as its various applications in food products. The main functional benefits of psyllium are presented in topics, as follows: the effect on cholesterol control, on type 2 diabetes, and on obesity and satiety.Key findings and conclusionsProducts containing psyllium can be an effective alternative to improve the functionality and produce healthy foods. The addition of psyllium to a food product (e.g. bakery goods, dairy, meat and gluten-free products). Can provide the health claim for a fiber-containing product, which is an important advantage in the market. In addition, it may allow consumers to ingest adequate amounts of fiber without increasing calorie intake, as well as contributing to other health benefits such as cholesterol control, glycemic control, satiety, among others. Psyllium can be easily added to food formulations and...
Source: Trends in Food Science and Technology - Category: Food Science Source Type: research

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This study aimed to investigate the irisin levels in elderly patients with hypertension, diabetes mellitus type 2, and overweight and obesity, to investigate the possible association between irisin levels and anthropometric and biochemical parameters, and also to assess the irisin levels associated with a risk of hypertension, diabetes mellitus type 2, and overweight and obesity.MethodsA nested case-control study was conducted, with hypertension, diabetes mellitus type 2, and overweight and obesity being set as the case group; 71 elderly patients from the cohort were enrolled in each case group, and 71 healthy elderly from...
Source: International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 13 January 2020Source: Medical Journal Armed Forces IndiaAuthor(s): Rajvir BhalwarAbstractMetabolic Syndrome (MetS) is a clustering of specific risk factors, namely, central obesity, raised blood pressure, impaired fasting glucose, raised triglycerides, and low levels of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C). This constellation is triggered by insulin resistance and its resultant hyperinsulinemia. The two most important and universally agreed causes of insulin resistance are increased body fat (particularly central obesity) and physical inactivity. Other causes include certain gene...
Source: Medical Journal Armed Forces India - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
ConclusionsBoth LRYGB and LSG have comparative effect on resolving T2DM in nonseverely obese patients at midterm follow-up. Further RCTs should address the potential risks and long-term effects of LRYGB and LSG in nonseverely obese patients.
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Conclusion A great deal of progress is being made in the matter of treating aging: in advocacy, in funding, in the research and development. It can never be enough, and it can never be fast enough, given the enormous cost in suffering and lost lives. The longevity industry is really only just getting started in the grand scheme of things: it looks vast to those of us who followed the slow, halting progress in aging research that was the state of things a decade or two ago. But it is still tiny compared to the rest of the medical industry, and it remains the case that there is a great deal of work yet to be done at all...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSION: It can be concluded that the presence of obesity may hinder the improvement of periodontal clinical parameters after conventional periodontal treatment in patients with diabetes mellitus and periodontitis. PMID: 31896102 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of the International Academy of Periodontology - Category: Dentistry Tags: J Int Acad Periodontol Source Type: research
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Source: Obesity - Category: Eating Disorders & Weight Management Authors: Tags: Obesity (Silver Spring) Source Type: research
Conclusion A great deal of progress is being made in the matter of treating aging: in advocacy, in funding, in the research and development. It can never be enough, and it can never be fast enough, given the enormous cost in suffering and lost lives. The longevity industry is really only just getting started in the grand scheme of things: it looks vast to those of us who followed the slow, halting progress in aging research that was the state of things a decade or two ago. But it is still tiny compared to the rest of the medical industry, and it remains the case that there is a great deal of work yet to be done at all...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Of Interest Source Type: blogs
Authors: Attal S, Mahmoud MH, Aseel MT, Candra A, Amuna P, Elnagmi M, Abdallah M, Ismail N, Abdelrazek A, Albaw D, Albashir A, Elmahdi H Abstract Background: Despite the high prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Gulf countries, standards of diabetes care at the primary care level have not been widely studied. Aim: To compare the results of diabetes clinical indicators from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) 2017 guidelines to the reference benchmarks in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of electronic medical records in 643 randomly se...
Source: International Journal of Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Int J Endocrinol Source Type: research
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSION: Reduced lung function precedes and significantly predicts the future development of T2D independently of obesity, smoking and inflammation in community-dwelling middle-aged and elderly people. PMID: 31884177 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Diabetes and Metabolism - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: Diabetes Metab Source Type: research
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