Should We Judge Stroke Risk by Static or Dynamic Risk Scores? A Focus on the Dynamic Nature of Stroke and Bleeding Risks in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation

Abstract: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most prevalent cardiac arrhythmia and a major risk factor for stroke. The number of patients with AF is predicted to increase in the next few decades. AF has also negative impact on quality of life as well as it significantly increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and overall mortality. Because the stroke is a pivotal outcome of AF, its prevention with the use of anticoagulation therapy constitutes an important component of AF management. The decision on oral anticoagulants' prescription should be based on appropriate risk stratification to allow for comprehensive assessment of benefit/hazard ratio of stroke and bleeding along with patients' preference. Several risk scores for stroke and bleeding as well as for stroke and systemic embolism have been developed, mainly in patients on vitamin K antagonists. AF guidelines stress the need for repetitive evaluation of thromboembolic and bleeding risks to tailor optimal AF management. Indeed, risk is not a static “one off” process and it should be adjusted for dynamic nature of risk factors. However, most risk scores are calculated according to baseline characteristics of patients, but the older the patients get, the more comorbidities they acquire, which influences stroke risk significantly. Hence, the default management of every patient with AF should include a regular reassessment of stroke and bleeding risk factors.
Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology - Category: Cardiology Tags: Invited Review Article Source Type: research

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ConclusionAcross geriatric subgroups, apixaban was consistently associated with the most favourable benefit-risk profile and should therefore be preferred in geriatric patients with AF. However, research gaps on the impact of increased falling risk, frailty and baseline dementia were identified, requiring careful consideration while awaiting more results.
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
In this study, we examined morbidity and mortality of patients with concomitant AF and liver cirrhosis from the National Inpatient Sample database, the largest publicly available inpatient healthcare database in the United States. RESULTS: A total of 696937 patients with liver cirrhosis were included, 45745 of whom had concomitant AF (6.6%). Liver cirrhosis patients with AF had higher rates of in-hospital mortality (12.6% vs 10.3%, P
Source: World Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: World J Cardiol Source Type: research
Authors: Gunawardene MA, Hartmann J, Jularic M, Eickholt C, Gessler N, Willems S Abstract Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequent persistent cardiac arrhythmia and is associated with an increased mortality. Therefore, an effective differential treatment of patients is mandatory. After a risk stratification oral anticoagulation (OAC) should be initiated depending on the individual stroke risk of each patient. Alternatively, in the presence of contraindications for OAC and an increased risk for bleeding and/or stroke, the implantation of a left atrial appendage closure device can be considered. Symptomatic pati...
Source: Herz - Category: Cardiology Tags: Herz Source Type: research
Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia in the general population. In western countries with aging populations, atrial fibrillation poses a significant health concern, as it is associated with a high risk of thromboembolism, stroke, congestive heart failure, and myocardial infarction. Thrombi are generated in the left atrial appendage, and subsequent embolism into the cerebral circulation is a major cause of ischemic stroke. Therefore, patients have a lifetime risk of stroke, and those at high risk, defined as a CHA2DS2-VASc2 (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age>75 years, diabetes mel...
Source: Cardiology in Review - Category: Cardiology Tags: Review Articles Source Type: research
AbstractAtrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia and is a major cause of embolic stroke. In patients at high bleeding risk such as those with hemophilia, the thromboembolic prevention is challenging. We herein present three patients affected by moderate to severe hemophilia and atrial fibrillation that were treated in our Institution between March 2018 and September 2019, with percutaneous left atrial appendage closure. In patients with relative or absolute contraindications to long-term anticoagulant therapy, the left atrial appendage closure could represent a reasonable strategy.
Source: Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis - Category: Hematology Source Type: research
ConclusionThere has been a significant increase in primary prevention practices for AF and this is reflected in the number of stroke patients presenting with known AF on a NOAC, however more needs to be done as there are still patients who have AF that are not being anticoagulated in the community.
Source: Age and Ageing - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
The prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common cardiac arrhythmia, increases with age, predisposing elderly patients to an increased risk of embolic stroke. With an increasingly aged population the number of people who experience a stroke every year, overall global burden of stroke, and numbers of stroke survivors and related deaths continue to increase. Anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) reduces the risk of ischemic stroke in patients with AF; however, increased bleeding risk is well documented, particularly in the elderly.
Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
Publication date: March 2018Source: Advances in Medical Sciences, Volume 63, Issue 1Author(s): Ewelina Michniewicz, Elżbieta Mlodawska, Paulina Lopatowska, Anna Tomaszuk-Kazberuk, Jolanta MalyszkoAbstractCoronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common cardiovascular disease while atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. Both diseases share associated risk factors – hypertension, diabetes mellitus, sleep apnea, obesity and smoking. Moreover, inflammation plays a causative role in both diseases. The prevalence of CAD in patients with AF is from 17% to 46.5% while the prevalence of AF among pati...
Source: Advances in Medical Sciences - Category: Biomedical Science Source Type: research
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia presenting in the daily clinical practice [1]. In the last 50  years, AF prevalence and incidence have been shown to constantly increase, progressively becoming a worldwide healthcare issue, with relevant public health expenditure, both in terms of clinical management and consequences related to the main clinical adverse events related to AF (i.e. stroke, ma jor bleeding, cardiovascular events) [1,2].
Source: International Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
By ANISH KOKA The weekend started with a tweet about an elderly man with atrial fibrillation.  Atrial fibrillation is an arrhythmia of the heart that predisposes those who suffer with it to strokes.  The strokes are a  result of clots being thrown from the heart into the brain.  The typical treatment for this condition in those deemed high enough risk is to thin the blood to help prevent these clots from forming, and thus reducing the risk of stroke. 101 year old with a history of a stroke stops his Pradaxa. Only other history hypertension. https://t.co/Ai5z519rcX — Anish Koka (@anish_koka) June ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
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