Decreased bone mineral density and osteoporotic fractures are associated with the development of echogenic plaques in the carotid arteries over a 10-year follow-up period: The Japanese Population-based Osteoporosis (JPOS) Cohort Study.

CONCLUSION: Osteoporotic BMD and osteoporotic fracture history were significantly, and independently, associated with an increased occurrence of echogenic plaques. Ultrasonographic screening of the carotid artery may benefit patients with osteoporosis. PMID: 31787146 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Atherosclerosis - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Maturitas Source Type: research

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Undergoing earlier menopause is a sign of a greater burden of age-related damage and dysfunction, so it should not be surprising to see that this correlates with a greater incidence of chronic disease in the years thereafter. People with a greater burden of cell and tissue damage tend to exhibit all of the manifestations of aging earlier than their less damaged peers. These variations in damage burden and consequences from individual to individual are near all the results of lifestyle choices, particularly smoking, weight, and exercise, and environmental factors such as exposure to chronic viral infection. Genetics plays o...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
Conclusion A great deal of progress is being made in the matter of treating aging: in advocacy, in funding, in the research and development. It can never be enough, and it can never be fast enough, given the enormous cost in suffering and lost lives. The longevity industry is really only just getting started in the grand scheme of things: it looks vast to those of us who followed the slow, halting progress in aging research that was the state of things a decade or two ago. But it is still tiny compared to the rest of the medical industry, and it remains the case that there is a great deal of work yet to be done at all...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusion A great deal of progress is being made in the matter of treating aging: in advocacy, in funding, in the research and development. It can never be enough, and it can never be fast enough, given the enormous cost in suffering and lost lives. The longevity industry is really only just getting started in the grand scheme of things: it looks vast to those of us who followed the slow, halting progress in aging research that was the state of things a decade or two ago. But it is still tiny compared to the rest of the medical industry, and it remains the case that there is a great deal of work yet to be done at all...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Of Interest Source Type: blogs
By HANS DUVEFELT, MD Medical researchers and their groupies – early adopters, thoughtleaders, those easily influenced or whatever you want to call them – never seem to learn that when you try to outsmart Mother Nature or Our Heavenly Father, whichever appeals more to your world view, you usually get your hand slapped. When I was a resident (1981-1984), I got penalized if I didn’t offer postmenopausal women estrogen-progesterone replacement therapy because it seemed obvious that if women with endogenous estrogen didn’t get many strokes or heart attacks and women without estrogen did, all we nee...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Medical Practice Physicians Primary Care Hans Duvefelt Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, there are new well tolerated and effective K+-binding agents for acutely and chronically managing hyperkalemia.
Source: Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: NOVEL THERAPEUTIC APPROACHES IN NEPHROLOGY AND HYPERTENSION: Edited by Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh and Ekamol Tantisattamo Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewMetabolic comorbidities including diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, all of which are traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors that are highly prevalent in people with HIV (PWH). Bone disease including osteopenia, osteoporosis, and fragility fractures is also prevalent in PWH. These comorbidities may be prevented and treated in part with lifestyle modification, including changes to dietary and physical habits. The purpose of this review is to highlight recent literature that characterizes current lifestyle habits in PWH as well as the effectiveness of lifestyle strategies to ...
Source: Current HIV/AIDS Reports - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
We present the case of a 59-year-old woman with third-grade obesity and severe comorbidities including osteoporosis, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, night eating following bariatric biliary-intestinal bypass surgery, severe fibromyalgia, poly-arthrosis, lumbar disc herniation in L5S1, sleep disorders and sleep apnea syndrome, and emotional disorders with anxiety and depression, who suffered from chronic pain unresponsive to a combination of multiple analgesics. After a period of metabolic and nutritional rehabilitation, analgesic treatment with tapentadol prolonged release (PR) was started and gradually incr...
Source: European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci Source Type: research
For Dr. Patrick Dowling, volunteering at the 2019Care Harbor free clinic for people who are uninsured or who lack access to health care is a sharp break from his norm of treating people at UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica.This atypical setting on the front lines of health care for the most vulnerable, sometimes results in unorthodox treatments.Dowling and other care givers at the annual clinic held at The Reef in downtown Los Angeles noticed that although the 60-year-old man they were treating said he had given himself insulin prior to his arrival at the clinic, his blood sugar level had fallen too low.Typically, physicia...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and chronic obstructive pulmonary (COPD), are usually accompanied by several comorbidities. Aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of comorbidities in OSA and COPD-OSA overlap syndrome (OS) patients and to explore differences between these two groups.Methods: Included were consecutive OS (n=163, 138 males, AHI>5/h and FEV1/FVC5/h and FEV1/FVC>0.7), matched in terms of gender, age, BMI, and smoking history, diagnosed with polysomnography and pulmonary function testing.Results: As mentioned, the two groups were matched in age (p=0.221), BMI (p=0.496) and neck circumfer...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Sleep and control of breathing Source Type: research
This study will report the results of a series of descriptive and survival analyses compare an exposure of COPD in people over 40 years old (N=22,942) to predict the outcomes of: heart failure, depression, anxiety, coronary artery disease, diabetes, anemia, hypertension, ischemic heart disease, underweight, and osteoporosis while controlling for EHR status of: smoking, age, sex, and rurality. Results will be computed in March 2019. By the date of the ERS Congress 2019, we will be able to report the results of the aforementioned analyses, which will demonstrate the utility of using large EMR datasets to illustrate comorbid ...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: General practice and primary care Source Type: research
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