CDC Says 102 People Infected With E. coli After Eating Romaine Lettuce Sourced From One Region

The Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advises consumers, retailers and restaurants throw out any romaine lettuce that was grown in the Salinas, Calif. region. The number of E. coli infections has increased to 102 cases reported in 23 states, including 10 cases of kidney failure, since the outbreak was declared late November. E. coli illnesses began in late September, according to the CDC, which is continuing to investigate if any other products can be linked to the outbreak. No common grower, supplier, distributor or brand of lettuce has been identified, the CDC reports. At least one case involves a child under the age of one, and multiple cases involve children under 18 years old, CDC spokesperson Laura Whitlock tells TIME. “If it’s romaine lettuce and it says it was grown in Salinas, do not eat it,” she says. “If you can’t tell where it was grown, do not eat it and throw it away.” Labels and stickers on the product will most often include where it was grown. Wisconsin has seen 31 cases since September, the most in any state so far. There have been 13 hospitalizations and and two people diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure, the Wisconsin Department of Health Services tells TIME. Ohio has also reported 12 E. coli cases, and 17 other states have reported between one and eight cases. At least 58 people have been hospitalized nationally. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is currently investiga...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news

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We examined STEC outbreaks linked to leafy greens during 2009-2018 in the United States and Canada. We identified 40 outbreaks, 1,212 illnesses, 77 cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome, and 8 deaths. More outbreaks were linked to romaine lettuce (54%) than to any other type of leafy green. More outbreaks occurred in the fall (45%) and spring (28%) than in other seasons. Barriers in epidemiologic and traceback investigations complicated identification of the ultimate outbreak source. Research on the seasonality of leafy green outbreaks and vulnerability to STEC contamination and bacterial survival dynamics by leafy green type...
Source: Emerging Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Emerg Infect Dis Source Type: research
Following infection with certain strains of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), particularly enterohemorrhagic ones, patients are at elevated risk for developing life-threatening extraintestinal complications, such as acute renal failure. Hence, these bacteria represent a public health concern in both developed and developing countries. Shiga toxins (Stxs) expressed by STEC are highly cytotoxic class II ribosome-inactivating proteins and primary virulence factors responsible for major clinical signs of Stx-mediated pathogenesis, including bloody diarrhea, hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), and neurological complic...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Infections with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) cause outbreaks of severe diarrheal disease in children and the elderly around the world. The severe complications associated with toxin production and release range from bloody diarrhea and hemorrhagic colitis to hemolytic-uremic syndrome, kidney failure, and neurological issues. As the use of antibiotics for treatment of the infection has long been controversial due to reports that antibiotics may increase the production of Shiga toxin, the recommended therapy today is mainly supportive. In recent years, a variety of alternative treatment approaches such as mo...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 26 January 2020Source: Food ControlAuthor(s): Hanxu Pan, Kai Dong, Lei Rao, Liang Zhao, Xiaomeng Wu, Yongtao Wang, Xiaojun LiaoAbstractEscherichia coli O157:H7, the causative agent of haemorrhagic colitis and haemolytic uremic syndrome in humans, has been implicated in large food-borne outbreaks all over the world. When confronted with harsh environmental stresses, it can enter into a viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state, which poses a great risk to food safety and public health since conventional methods are invalid to detect VBNC cells. Herein, a system for detecting VBNC state Escheri...
Source: Food Control - Category: Food Science Source Type: research
The US Centers for Disease Control and the US Food and Drug Administration have declared that the recent nationwide E. Coli outbreak, which contaminated romaine lettuce, ended as of Wednesday. Authorities traced the outbreak back to the Salinas Valley growing region in California. The FDA has lifted a consumer advisory to avoid romaine lettuce from Salinas “as the growing season for this region is over and there is no longer a need for consumers to avoid it.” Health officials had previously advised consumers, retailers and restaurants to throw out any romaine lettuce grown in the Salinas, Calif. region. People...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized onetime public health Source Type: news
(CNN) — Caesar salad lovers rejoice — your crispy romaine lettuce leaves are OK to eat now. The nationwide, monthslong E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce ended Wednesday, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the US Food and Drug Administration. The romaine, which came from Salinas, California, infected a total of 167 people in 27 states. This included 85 hospitalizations, including 15 patients who developed a type of kidney failure — hemolytic uremic syndrome — known to be associated with this particular type of bacteria, E. coli O157:H7. The toxin produced by t...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Romaine Lettuce Source Type: news
Authors: Luna-Guevara JJ, Arenas-Hernandez MMP, Martínez de la Peña C, Silva JL, Luna-Guevara ML Abstract Many raw vegetables, such as tomato, chili, onion, lettuce, arugula, spinach, and cilantro, are incorporated into fresh dishes including ready-to-eat salads and sauces. The consumption of these foods confers a high nutritional value to the human diet. However, the number of foodborne outbreaks associated with fresh produce has been increasing, with Escherichia coli being the most common pathogen associated with them. In humans, pathogenic E. coli strains cause diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis, hemoly...
Source: International Journal of Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Tags: Int J Microbiol Source Type: research
Ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday, the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advises consumers, retailers and restaurants throw out any romaine lettuce that was grown in the Salinas, Calif. region after 67 cases of E. coli have been reported in 19 states, including six cases of kidney failure. E. coli illnesses began in late September, according to the CDC, which is continuing to investigate if any other products can be linked to the outbreak. At least one case involves a 3-year-old child, and multiple cases involve children under 18 years old, CDC spokesperson Laura Whitlock tells TIME. “If it’s ro...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news
We examined 252 rectal swabs obtained from 134 roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), 97 red deer (Cervus elaphus) and 21 fallow deer (Dama dama) in north-eastern Poland. The samples were enriched in modified buffered peptone water. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were conducted to determine the virulence profile of stx1, stx2 and eae or aggR genes, to identify the subtypes of stx1 and stx2 genes, and to perform O and H serotyping. E. coli O157:H7 isolates were detected in the rectal swabs collected from 1/134 roe deer (0.75%) and 4/97 red deer (4.1%), and they were not detected in fallow deer (Dama dama). The remaining E....
Source: Food Microbiology - Category: Food Science Authors: Tags: Food Microbiol Source Type: research
Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is an important pathogen that causes diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis, and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). After an EHEC outbreak involving uncooked beef, serving raw beef ...
Source: BMC Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
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