Clinical Characteristics and Treatment of MOG-IgG –Associated Optic Neuritis

AbstractPurpose of ReviewAntibodies against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) are associated with a unique acquired central nervous system demyelinating disease —termed MOG-IgG-associated disorder (MOGAD)—which has a variety of clinical manifestations, including optic neuritis, transverse myelitis, acute disseminating encephalomyelitis, and brainstem encephalitis. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the clinical characteristics, neuroi maging, treatments, and outcomes of MOGAD, with a focus on optic neuritis.Recent FindingsThe recent development of a reproducible, live cell –based assay for MOG-IgG, has improved our ability to identify and study this disease. Based on contemporary studies, it has become increasingly evident that MOGAD is distinct from multiple sclerosis and aquaporin-4-positive neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder with different clinical features a nd treatment outcomes.SummaryThere is now sufficient evidence to separate MOGAD from other inflammatory central nervous system demyelinating disorders, which will allow focused research on understanding the pathophysiology of the disease. Prospective treatment trials are needed to determine the best course of treatment, and until then, treatment plans must be individualized to the clinical manifestations and severity of disease.
Source: Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research

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Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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Source: Neurology India - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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Source: Current Opinion in Neurology - Category: Neurology Tags: CNS INFLAMMATORY DISORDERS OUTSIDE MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS: Edited by Bruce T. Volpe Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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Source: Radiologia Brasileira - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Abstract Various neuropathologies produce hyperintense signals on T2-weighted or fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences of the temporal lobes. Recognition of the distribution pattern and associated findings may narrow the spectrum of differential diagnoses or suggest a specific disease. This pictorial essay aims to illustrate the relatively common diseases that affect the temporal lobe, such as herpes simplex encephalitis, neurosyphilis, limbic encephalitis, postictal edema, neoplasia, and multiple sclerosis, as well as those that are less common, such as myotonic dystrophy type 1, CADASIL, and CARASIL, together wit...
Source: Radiologia Brasileira - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
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