CCTA, functional tests stratify heart disease risk by age

The combination of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) scans and functional tests...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: FFR-CT beats CCTA for assessing heart disease outcomes CCTA reveals statins may lower mortality in low-risk CAD CCTA biomarker may predict mortality from heart disease SCOT-HEART: CCTA cuts risk of heart attack, death by 41% CCTA biomarker spots high-risk plaques in heart disease
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news

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A HEART ATTACK is primarily caused by coronary heart disease - when the arteries that supply blood to the heart became clogged with cholesterol. However, eating one sweet treat could reduce the risk of developing the deadly condition.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusions It is suggested we should take sufficient care of postmenopausal females with depression and control blood pressure and glucose more effectively. Abbreviations HP: Hypertension; DM: Diabetes; TC: Cholesterol; TG: Triglyceride; BMI: Body-Mass Index; CES-D: Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression; CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; HR: Hazard Ratio; CI: Confidence Interval; ADL: Activities of daily living scale. PMID: 32715792 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Clinical and Experimental Hypertension - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Clin Exp Hypertens Source Type: research
In this study, we applied a well studied prediction model developed on data from five CpG sites, to increase the practicability of these tests. We have determined the biological age of the heart, specifically of the right atrium (RA) and left atrium (LA), and of peripheral blood leucocytes, by measuring the mitotic telomere length (TL) and the non-mitotic epigenetic age (DNAmAge). We found that DNAmAge, of both atrial tissues (RA and LA), was younger in respect to the chronological age (-12 years). Furthermore, no significant difference existed between RA and LA, suggesting that, although anatomically diverse and ex...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading killer of both women and men in the US. Despite the significant impact CVD has on women, awareness and education for women’s heart disease has historically been low. A recent study, based on data from over two million patients, suggests that women were less likely to be prescribed aspirin, statins, and certain blood pressure medications compared to men. CVD is a group of diseases involving the heart or blood vessels. It includes high blood pressure (hypertension), coronary artery disease, heart attacks, heart failure, heart valve problems, and abnormal heart rhythms. CVD ca...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Drugs and Supplements Heart Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
(Natural News) If you’ve been trying to keep your cholesterol down in hopes of avoiding a heart attack, you might be barking up the wrong tree. That’s because an international study has shown that LDL cholesterol does not actually predict a person’s risk of heart disease after all. This also means that the statin drugs...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Now that marijuana is legal for medical or recreational use in many states, growing numbers of Americans — including older people — are imbibing this popular drug. In fact, the percentage of people ages 65 and older who said they used some form of marijuana almost doubled between 2015 and 2018, a recent study reports. Compared with prescription drugs, the health consequences of using marijuana are not nearly as well studied. But converging evidence suggests that the drug may be harmful for the heart, according to a review article in JACC: Journal of the American College of Cardiology. More than two million Amer...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Heart Health Marijuana Source Type: blogs
Beta-adrenergic blockers remain one of the cornerstones in the management of coronary artery disease, both in chronic stable angina and myocardial infarction. These recommendations were based on studies conducted in the era prior to the establishment of the modern therapy for ischemic heart disease and myocardial infarction i.e. anti-platelet therapy, statins, and percutaneous coronary interventions. Recent studies emerged questioning the beneficial effect of beta-blockers in the management of patients with stable ischemic heart disease and myocardial infarction. In this review, we will discuss briefly the pharmacology of ...
Source: Recent Patents on Cardiovascular Drug Discovery - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Purpose of review To discuss the current evidence regarding the relationship between omega-3 fatty acid intake and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk. Recent findings Combined results from randomized controlled trials using low-dosage (≤1.8 g/day of ethyl esters) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) or EPA + docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) suggest a small benefit for reducing coronary heart disease risk. The Reduction of Cardiovascular Events with EPA-Intervention Trial (REDUCE-IT) that administered 4 g/day icosapent ethyl (IPE) to individuals on statin at high or very high ASCVD risk with elevated triglycer...
Source: Current Opinion in Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Tags: LIPIDS AND EMERGING RISK FACTORS: Edited by Dimitri P. Mikhailidis and Anthony S. Wierzbicki Source Type: research
Conclusions. LDL-C is the lipid fraction strongest associated with younger age of presentation of first MI. These results support the importance of controlling and treating LDL-C in prevention of premature MI. PMID: 32483990 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal - Category: Cardiology Tags: Scand Cardiovasc J Source Type: research
(CNN) — Still taking a daily aspirin to ward off heart attacks? You might want to think again, according to a new review. Aspirin is still one of the most commonly used medications in the world, even though it’s no longer recommended as a preventative by many health authorities. There is no evidence that low-dose aspirin — less than 325 milligrams a day — should be taken by most adults in good cardiovascular health, according to a new review of existing research that published Wednesday in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. The review, which focused on the risks and benefits of low-dose d...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News aspirin CNN Source Type: news
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