Effects of massage on vital signs, pain and comfort levels in liver transplant patients

This study aimed to determine the effects of back massage on postoperative vital signs, pain, and comfort levels in liver transplant patients.MethodsA quasi-experimental model with a pretest, a posttest, and a control group was used. The population of the study comprised adult patients who had liver transplantation for the first time. The study sample comprised 84 adult patients who had liver transplantation: 42 experimental (study group) and 42 control group, selected by power analysis and the random sampling method from the population. The data were collected between May and September 2016 using the short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ) and the General Comfort Scale. In the study group, the researcher performed back massage twice per day in the morning and evening in the organ transplant service. No treatment was performed in the control group. To analyse the data, descriptive statistics, a chi-squared test, a t test for dependent groups, and a t test for independent groups were used.ResultsAccording to morning and evening follow-ups after liver transplantation, the mean scores of pulse rate, respiration rate, blood pressure values, and pain intensity was lower, and the mean score of sPO2 (oxygen saturation) levels and comfort levels was higher, with a statistical significance in the experimental group compared with the control group in all measurements before and after back massage (p 
Source: EXPLORE: The Journal of Science and Healing - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research

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Three researchers at the  Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have received awards totaling more than $18 million from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the state’s stem cell agency. The recipients areDr. Sophie Deng, professor of ophthalmology at the UCLA Stein Eye Institute;  Yvonne Chen, a UCLA associate professor of microbiology, immunology and molecular genetics; andDr. Caroline Kuo, a UCLA assistant clinical professor of pediatrics. The awards were announced at a CIRM meeting today.Deng ’s four-year, $10.3 million award ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Healthcare Source Type: news
Multivitamins, drugs, gene therapies, human skin, heart, eyeballs, kidneys, entire dead bodies – everything comes with a price tag. Putting aside the moral questions of why and how come that the capitalist market priced even our body parts and health, we asked the question of how much is life worth: what is the maximum that you would/should pay for a life-saving drug? How high is too high a cost if a drug can save 200-300 babies a year from debilitating illness or death? And ultimately, does the pricing of new technologies, especially gene therapies, enable to fulfill their promise? There’s a price for ever...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Bioethics Biotechnology Future of Pharma Genomics cost daraprim drug drug price Gene gene therapy genetics insulin life medication pricing policy rare disease rare disorder Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Sport and Health Science - Category: Sports Medicine Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Family Friends Grief and Loss Health-related Inspiration & Hope Personal Relationships Bereavement Coping grieving Source Type: blogs
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