Total joint replacement improves pain, functional quality of life, and health utilities in patients with late-stage knee and hip osteoarthritis for up to 5 years

ConclusionsJoint arthroplasty is a highly valuable therapeutic strategy for hip or knee OA patients who do not respond to pharmacological management. These results represent a step towards the collection of robust, scientifically sound data that will facilitate the completion of health economic analyses in the field of OA.Key Points:• This study reports the long term outcomes of hip and knee replacement surgery in late-stage OA.• We identified pre-, per-, and post-operative determinants which contribute to a greater improvement in pain and function, hence increasing patients’ satisfaction.• These results could contribute to select an OA population which has a high probability to get an optimal benefit from total joint replacement.
Source: Clinical Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research

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Conclusion: These findings support the hypothesis that in FM a deteriorated function of cortical inhibition, indexed by a higher SICI parameter, a lower function of the DPMS, together with a higher level of BDNF indicate that FM has different pathological substrates from depression. They suggest that an up-regulation phenomenon of intracortical inhibitory networks associated with a disruption of the DPMS function occurs in FM. Introduction Major depressive disorder (MDD) and fibromyalgia (FM) present overlapped symptoms. Although the connection between these two disorders has not been elucidated yet, the disruption...
Source: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Self-efficacy was related to the level of education, physical activity, mobility, and comorbidity. In addition, hip problems or obesity were associated with greater difficulties in enhancing or maintaining self-efficacy. An increased focus on patients with hip problems or obesity might help to improve outcomes after supported self-management programs for osteoarthritis. IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION Self-efficacy increased more in younger patients and in those who opted for exercise as part of the intervention, which indicates that offering supported self-management early in the course of the disease might be...
Source: Disability and Rehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Authors: Tags: Disabil Rehabil Source Type: research
Osteoarthritis of the wrist and hand can cause significant functional impairment and disability. Its management is as much an art as it is science, as one has to consider increasing patient expectations, functional demands, pain relief and preserving motion. A sound knowledge of the wrist and hand anatomy, biomechanics, appreciation of the specific location and grade of wrist and hand joints arthritis and various treatment options and their pros and cons is important to successfully manage patients with this condition.
Source: Orthopaedics and Trauma - Category: Orthopaedics Authors: Tags: The hand Source Type: research
Abstract In the United States, 54.4 million adults report having doctor-diagnosed arthritis (1). Among adults with arthritis, 32.7% and 38.1% also have overweight and obesity, respectively (1), with obesity being more prevalent among persons with arthritis than among those who do not have arthritis (2). Furthermore, severe joint pain among adults with arthritis in 2014 was reported by 23.5% of adults with overweight and 31.7% of adults with obesity (3). The American College of Rheumatology recommends weight loss for adults with hip or knee osteoarthritis and overweight or obesity,* which can improve function and m...
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep Source Type: research
Authors: Riis RG Abstract Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is one of the most common causes of physical disability in the elderly population. With an increasing ageing and obese population, the prevalence of KOA is expected to rise substantially. The needs for a better understanding of the disease and tools that can predict the course of the disease, for example following treatment, are therefore imperative. 

Inflammation has over the last years been recognised as an important factor for both the symptomatology and disease course in KOA. Synovitis, inflammation of the synovium, is the hallmark of intra-articular infl...
Source: Danish Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: Dan Med J Source Type: research
In this study, the “tailored” group underwent seven days of monitoring using an accelerometer, the results were downloaded, analysed and an individualised pacing plan developed by the therapists. The plan was intended to highlight times when the person had high or low levels of activity (as compared with their own average, and averages drawn from previous studies of people with the same diagnosis), and to point out associations between these activity levels and self reported symptoms. Participants were then provided with ideas for changing their activity levels to optimise their ability to sustain activity and ...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: 'Pacing' or Quota Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Coping Skills Coping strategies Occupational therapy Pain conditions Research function Motivation pain management self management Therapeutic approaches values Source Type: blogs
The WHO reports that one of the major chronic conditions affecting the elderly worldwide is musculoskeletal disorders that are associated with long-term pain and disability. Considering the healthcare needs of the elderly (i.e. comprehensive, accessible, efficient) and the advantages of ultrasound (US) use (patient-friendly, convenient, cost-effective, and does not require exposure to radiation or magnetic fields), there seems to be a ‘gap’ in the actual clinical practice. In this paper, we aimed to highlight the potential value of US imaging in the management of the elderly with a wide spectrum of musculoskele...
Source: International Journal of Rehabilitation Research - Category: Rehabilitation Tags: Review articles Source Type: research
Prominent researchers, clinicians and commentators seem to suggest that aiming to help people live with their pain is aiming too low. That pain cure or at least reduction is The Thing To Do. It’s certainly got a bit of a ring to it – “I can help get rid of your pain” has a sex appeal that “I can help you live with your pain” doesn’t have. And I can recognise the appeal. Persistent pain can be a scourge for those who live with it; it can eat away at every part of life. Imagine waking up one day to find NO PAIN! Excited much? So why do I keep hammering on about this not very glamorou...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Coping Skills Coping strategies Professional topics Research Resilience/Health Science in practice acceptance function healthcare self management Therapeutic approaches Source Type: blogs
The WHO reports that one of the major chronic conditions affecting the elderly worldwide is musculoskeletal disorders that are associated with long-term pain and disability. Considering the healthcare needs of the elderly (i.e. comprehensive, accessible, efficient) and the advantages of ultrasound (US) use (patient-friendly, convenient, cost-effective, and does not require exposure to radiation or magnetic fields), there seems to be a ‘gap’ in the actual clinical practice. In this paper, we aimed to highlight the potential value of US imaging in the management of the elderly with a wide spectrum of musculoskele...
Source: International Journal of Rehabilitation Research - Category: Rehabilitation Tags: Review articles Source Type: research
Authors: Neogi T Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis, with knee OA itself being among the most common conditions and a leading cause of disability among older adults worldwide. Pain is a key symptom in the decision to seek medical attention, yet available therapies for managing OA are limited with only minimal or moderate efficacy. Current approaches to pain management in OA have been rather non-specific, limited to acetaminophen or NSAIDs primarily, without targeting underlying structural lesions that may be contributing to pain in OA. With the advent of MRI, a number of studies have ...
Source: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Tags: Clin Exp Rheumatol Source Type: research
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