CE: Implementing Guidelines for Treating Chronic Pain with Prescription Opioids.

CE: Implementing Guidelines for Treating Chronic Pain with Prescription Opioids. Am J Nurs. 2019 Nov;119(11):22-29 Authors: Maloy PE, Iacocca MO, Morasco BJ Abstract Chronic pain, stemming primarily from musculoskeletal conditions and severe headaches, is a growing problem in the United States, affecting as many as 43% of adults. Opioids are frequently prescribed to manage chronic pain despite limited data on their long-term efficacy and the potential risks of long-term use. In 2017, more than 47,000 people died as a result of an opioid overdose involving illicit opioids (such as heroin), illicitly manufactured opioids, diverted opioids, prescription opioids, or some combination thereof. Although it's been more than three years since the nationwide opioid crisis prompted the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to release a guideline outlining safe practices for prescribing opioids to patients with chronic pain (unrelated to active cancer or palliative and end-of-life care), opioid misuse remains a significant concern. Historically, physicians have been tasked with the primary responsibility for implementing opioid safety measures, but nurses in the primary care setting are being increasingly relied on to incorporate these measures as part of their practice. In this article, we discuss the use of five tools outlined in the CDC guideline: prescription opioid treatment agreements, urine drug screening, prescription drug monitoring program datab...
Source: The American Journal of Nursing - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: Am J Nurs Source Type: research

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ABSTRACT: Chronic pain, stemming primarily from musculoskeletal conditions and severe headaches, is a growing problem in the United States, affecting as many as 43% of adults. Opioids are frequently prescribed to manage chronic pain despite limited data on their long-term efficacy and the potential risks of long-term use. In 2017, more than 47,000 people died as a result of an opioid overdose involving illicit opioids (such as heroin), illicitly manufactured opioids, diverted opioids, prescription opioids, or some combination thereof. Although it's been more than three years since the nationwide opioid crisis prompted th...
Source: AJN - Category: Nursing Tags: Feature Articles Source Type: research
Ryan R. Kelly1,2†, Lindsay T. McDonald1,2†, Nathaniel R. Jensen1,2, Sara J. Sidles1,2 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2* 1Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States The significant biochemical and physiological effects of psychological stress are beginning to be recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current evidence for psychological stress-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for os...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
How Bad Is Fentanyl? Fentanyl is an extremely dangerous synthetic opioid. Unlike some other opioids that occur naturally, it is man-made for the purpose of helping aid people suffering from extreme pain. It can be administered for recovery after surgery, during cancer treatments or for recovery after a painful injury. The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) classifies fentanyl as a Schedule II controlled substance. This means that it is legal for medical use, however, it has an extremely high potential for abuse and addiction. Understanding Fentanyl Significantly stronger than morphine or oxycodone, Fentanyl can be fatal...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Heroin Painkiller Substance Abuse Synthetic fentanyl prescription drug abuse prescription drug addiction prescription drug detox prescription drug use p Source Type: blogs
AbstractPurpose of ReviewThe prevalence of chronic pain and prescription opioid abuse has resulted in epidemic problems for patients and clinicians. The consequences are taking a heavy toll on patients, physicians, and society. Specific to radiology, a significant need exists for best practice assessment and treatment approaches for pain management, as patients with chronic pain often undergo radiological tests of unclear clinical relevance.Recent FindingsThe USA is amid an opioid-prescribing epidemic and resultant overdose public health emergency. A variety of reasons, which are examined in this manuscript, have contribut...
Source: Current Pain and Headache Reports - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
The debate about cannabis and derivatives for persistent pain continues to grow in New Zealand, and elsewhere in the world. Many people I’ve treated and who are living with persistent pain say they like to use cannabis (in a variety of forms) to help with pain intensity and sleep, adding their voices to those wanting “medicinal” cannabis to be approved. In the few patients I’ve worked with who have managed to obtain a cannabis product (in NZ it has to be legally prescribed and will generally be in the form of Sativex or similar) the effect doesn’t seem as profound as the real thing (whether sm...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Chronic pain Therapeutic approaches Research Pain conditions Coping strategies Science in practice Health healthcare biopsychosocial pain management Source Type: blogs
Conclusion. A review of the literature suggests that there are adequate data supporting the efficacy and general safety of the low-dose use of trazodone for the treatment of insomnia. keywords: insomnia, hypnotics, treatment, trazodone, sedative Keywords: insomnia, hypnotics, treatment, trazodone, sedative Innov Clin Neurosci. 2017;14(9–10):24–34 Introduction Insomnia is characterized by difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, or waking too early1 and is associated with significant impairments in daytime activities, which might occur despite adequate opportunities for sleep.2–6 Primary insom...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue Review hypnotics insomnia sedative trazodone treatment Source Type: research
When I was in medical school, doctors only wrote prescriptions for opioid painkillers for terminal cancer patients, surgical patients and critical emergencies. That's because they knew these drugs were lethal. Opioids come from the same poppy plant used to make opium and heroin. And just like those addictive street drugs, the risk of getting hooked on them is extremely high. It's incredible how things have changed since then… What are opioids prescribed for? Today, you're likely to get a prescription for opioids for just about any kind of pain. That includes chronic pain, fibromyalgia, depression, heada...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Health Natural Cures Source Type: news
With medications that carry significant risks, such as opioids, appropriate prescribing practices are critical to patient safety. One physician in Boston lives by a mantra that puts patients first: Judge the treatment, not the patient. We need to start re-conceptualizing chronic pain as a chronic disease, said Daniel P. Alford, MD, associate professor of medicine at the Boston University School of Medicine and director of the Safe and Competent Opioid Prescribing Education (SCOPE of Pain) program. “Acute pain is a symptom, and it’s life-sustaining—and you need to feel acute pain in order to survive,&r...
Source: AMA Wire - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Source Type: news
Conclusion This systematic review found no evidence that opioids provide a meaningful effect on chronic non-specific lower back pain. Opioids are often used as a last resort for people who have not responded to other painkillers. But these results found opioids gave only half the size of the effect that would be needed to make a real difference – about a 10-point score difference, rather than 20. On the whole, the body of evidence was high quality. A large number of trials where identified, and most were multi-centre trials with good sample sizes carried out in the US, Canada, Australia and Europe. This means ...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Medical practice Neurology Source Type: news
It makes sense that the primary goal of pain treatment should be to reduce pain. However, a recent editorial in The New England Journal of Medicine makes a strong case for looking beyond pain intensity when evaluating what is “successful” pain management. The “balancing act” of managing chronic pain Here is the problem: For people with chronic pain, the pain affects nearly all aspects of their lives. But at the same time, treatments to relieve chronic pain also have the potential to influence many aspects of a person’s life. Our best pain-relieving drugs have lots of unpleasant side effects. E...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Addiction Arthritis Back Pain Cancer Migraines Pain Management Behavioral Health chronic pain managing pain Source Type: news
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