Mucoprotective effects of Saikosaponin-A in 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in mice model

Publication date: Available online 19 October 2019Source: Life SciencesAuthor(s): Jawad Ali, Ashraf Ullah Khan, Fawad Ali Shah, Hussain Ali, Salman Ul Islam, Yeong Shik Kim, Salman KhanAbstract5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced intestinal mucositis (IM) is one of the most common oncological problem. It involves serious clinical consequences such as diarrhea, erythematous lesions of mucosa, and eventually development of ulcers accompanied by severe pain. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate the mucoprotective effects of Saikosaponin-A in 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in mice. Mucositis was induced in BALB/c mice by intraperitoneal injection of 5-FU (50 mg/kg/day) for three consecutive days and IM was assessed by both behavioral and histochemical analysis. While, Saikosaponin-A (1, 5, 10 mg/kg/day) was administered 1 h before 5-FU injection for consecutive seven days. Pre-treatment of Saikosaponin-A significantly ameliorated the severity of mucositis reflected as food intake, body weight loss, severity of diarrhea and mortality rate in a dose depended manner as compared to mice treated with 5-FU. Moreover, histopathological analysis furthered reinforced the mucoprotective potential of Saikosaponin-A against 5-FU-induced intestinal abnormalities referred as villus atrophy, mitotic crypt stem cells damage, inflammatory cells infiltration, vacuolization and edema. Furthermore, Saikosaponin-A administration strongly inhibited pro-inflammatory mediators (TNF-α,...
Source: Life Sciences - Category: Biology Source Type: research

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Publication date: November 2019Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology, Volume 16, Issue 11, SupplementAuthor(s): Expert Panel on Thoracic Imaging, Christopher Lee, Patrick M. Colletti, Jonathan H. Chung, Jeanne B. Ackman, Mark F. Berry, Brett W. Carter, Patricia M. de Groot, Stephen B. Hobbs, Geoffrey B. Johnson, Fabien Maldonado, Barbara L. McComb, Betty C. Tong, Christopher M. Walker, Jeffrey P. KanneAbstractThe immunocompromised patient with an acute respiratory illness (ARI) may present with fever, chills, weight loss, cough, shortness of breath, or chest pain. The number of immunocompromised patients con...
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
The immunocompromised patient with an acute respiratory illness (ARI) may present with fever, chills, weight loss, cough, shortness of breath, or chest pain. The number of immunocompromised patients continues to rise with medical advances including solid organ and stem cell transplantation, chemotherapy, and immunomodulatory therapy, along with the continued presence of human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Given the myriad of pathogens that can infect immunocompromised individuals, identifying the specific organism or organisms causing the lung disease can be elusive.
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology : JACR - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Appropriate use criteria Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: All tested biosimilars demonstrated similar effectiveness and safety profiles in patients with hematological tumors undergoing PBSC mobilization; therefore, they can be used interchangeably. PMID: 31663634 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Clinical Lymphoma and Myeloma - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: J Clin Apher Source Type: research
It’s only been seven years since scientists first learned how to precisely and reliably splice the human genome using a tool called CRISPR, making it possible to think about snipping out disease-causing mutations and actually cure, once and for all, genetic diseases ranging from sickle cell anemia to certain types of cancer and even blindness. Doctors are plunging ahead in search of ways to use the relatively new technology to start treating patients. In China last November, scientist Jiankui He stunned—and dismayed—the genetic community when he announced he had already used CRISPR, which many believe sti...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized crispr Genetics Source Type: news
When leukemia took over young Elham’s health in 2014, her parents were devastated. At just 12 years-old, she would experience pain that no child her age should know. Lost and unsure of how to help their daughter, they didn’t realize that after many unsuccessful tries, their miracle would be what was growing inside of Elham’s mom’s belly. After undergoing three unsuccessful rounds of aggressive chemotherapy, Elham’s doctors suggested a second option for treatment: a bone marrow transplant, recommended for its hematopoietic stem cells which are known for their ability to replace diseased blood c...
Source: Cord Blood News - Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Tags: Cord Blood stem cells Source Type: blogs
In this study, we identify a link between members of the genus Veillonella and exercise performance. We observed an increase in Veillonella relative abundance in marathon runners postmarathon and isolated a strain of Veillonella atypica from stool samples. Inoculation of this strain into mice significantly increased exhaustive treadmill run time. Veillonella utilize lactate as their sole carbon source, which prompted us to perform a shotgun metagenomic analysis in a cohort of elite athletes, finding that every gene in a major pathway metabolizing lactate to propionate is at higher relative abundance postexercise. Us...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Rationale: HIV-related lymphoma, especially non-Hodgkin lymphoma, is one of the most common malignant tumors in HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) for the patients with Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is needed to be further explored. Patient concerns: A 57-year-old man was hospitalized with intermittent pain on upper abdomen and melena for>1 month. Diagnosis: HIV antibody testing was positive. The upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed and histopathology and immunohistochemistry revealed BL. Interventions: Highly effective antiret...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Clinical Case Report Source Type: research
Rationale: Neuroblastoma is one of the most common malignant tumors in childhood, which mainly occurs in adrenal glands and peripheral sympathetic nerve system. Neuroblastoma occurring in adulthood is rare, and adults with neuroblastoma arising from thorax are exceedingly rare. A case of neuroblastoma that originated from thorax was reported, and was treated by resection operation. Patient concerns: A 46-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with left side chest pain for 5 days. Laboratory examinations were all normal. Chest computerized tomogram (CT) showed a lesion with clear boundary that was located at the l...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Clinical Case Report Source Type: research
Reena Goswami1, Gayatri Subramanian2, Liliya Silayeva1, Isabelle Newkirk1, Deborah Doctor1, Karan Chawla2, Saurabh Chattopadhyay2, Dhyan Chandra3, Nageswararao Chilukuri1 and Venkaiah Betapudi1,4* 1Neuroscience Branch, Research Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Aberdeen, MD, United States 2Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences, Toledo, OH, United States 3Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Buffalo, NY, United States 4Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Case Western Reserve University, Clev...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Oral mucositis is a significant complication of cancer therapy because of the associated pain and negative effects on the ability to eat, drink, and swallow and on the quality of life. Furthermore, oral mucositis increases the risk of systemic infection, and may interrupt cancer therapy. Oral mucositis manifests as erosions or ulcerations of the nonkeratinized oral mucosa, and its course depends on the form of cancer therapy. Oral mucositis affects an estimated 14% to 81% of patients undergoing some forms of chemotherapy, begins within days of initiating treatment, and lasts for up to 2 weeks depending on the dose, intensi...
Source: JAMA - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
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