Long-term Outcomes Following Lumbar Microendoscopic Diskectomy and Microendoscopic Decompression: Minimum 10-year Follow-up Evaluation Performed Using a Patient-based Outcome Measure

J Neurol Surg A Cent Eur Neurosurg DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1688559 Study Design Retrospective study of prospectively collected outcome data. Background No studies have evaluated the long-term outcomes following microendoscopic diskectomy for lumbar disk herniation (MEDH) and microendoscopic decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis (MEDS) using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire (JOABPEQ). Objective To assess the minimum 10-year outcomes following MEDH and MEDS. Patients and Methods Seventy-six patients were classified into three groups: disk herniation (DH) group (33 patients underwent MEDH); spinal stenosis (SS) group (23 patients underwent MEDS); and degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) group (20 DS patients underwent MEDS). The follow-up rate was 50.3% (76/151). The results were statistically compared using Scheffé's F test for differences among the DH, SS, and DS groups. The paired t test was used to compare the preoperative and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) scores. The degrees of improvement (DOIs) on JOABPEQ and the intensities of improvement (IOIs) on VAS at the first follow-up evaluation (FFE) (mean: 12 months after the operation) and at the most recent follow-up evaluation (MRFE) (mean: 126 months) of the DH group were statistically compared by the paired t test. DOIs and IOIs at MRFE of the SS group (mean: 126 months) and DS group (mean: 125 months) were statistically compared by the un...
Source: Journal of Neurological Surgery Part A: Central European Neurosurgery - Category: Neurosurgery Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Related Links:

Conclusion5R-STS performance differs according to the etiology of back and leg pain, even after adjustment for demographic covariates. In combination with machine learning algorithms, OFI can be used to infer the etiology of spinal back and leg pain with accuracy comparable to other diagnostic tests used in clinical examination.Graphic abstractThese slides can be retrieved under Electronic Supplementary Material.
Source: European Spine Journal - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
Conclusions: Microendoscopic decompression is an effective treatment for patients with DS and concurrent LSS, with only 5% of patients requiring subsequent fusion at over 2-year follow-up, and another 5% requiring revision or adjacent segment decompression. The advanced stage DS group, indicating a>10% anterolisthesis and/or>3 mm of dynamic instability, was more likely to require additional surgery.
Source: Journal of Spinal Disorders and Techniques - Category: Surgery Tags: PRIMARY RESEARCH Source Type: research
Lower back pain (LBP) is prevalent in Western society and a common reason for a medical consultation [1,2]. The resultant reduction of life quality, work performance and social interactions for affected persons has led to intensive research efforts focused on the development of new treatment methods [3]. Besides non-specific back pain, several disabilities with an existing morphological correlate can be the cause of these symptoms, for instance lumbar spinal stenosis or degenerative spondylolisthesis [4].
Source: Gait and Posture - Category: Orthopaedics Authors: Source Type: research
J Neurol Surg A Cent Eur Neurosurg DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1655760 Background Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and low-grade degenerative spondylolisthesis are frequently associated with facet joint degeneration, considered the main cause of low back pain. Surgery is the treatment of choice in patients affected by LSS unresponsive to conservative treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiologic outcome of patients treated with posterior decompression and transfacet fixation for single-level LSS and facet joint degeneration. Methods A total of 25 patients between May 2015 and June 2016 af...
Source: Journal of Neurological Surgery Part A: Central European Neurosurgery - Category: Neurosurgery Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
We reported the results of minimally invasive spinal decompression (MISD) in patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) associated with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and performed a literature review in order to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes, the complications and reoperation rate of MISD procedures in these patients.Data of 28 patients submitted to MISD for DS associated to LSS were reviewed. We evaluated the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) both for low back pain (LBP) and legs pain, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the degree of the slippage. A PubMed search of the English literature was conduc...
Source: Polish Journal of Neurology and Neurosurgery - Category: Neurosurgery Source Type: research
We reported the results of minimally invasive spinal decompression (MISD) in patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) associated with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and performed a literature review in order to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes, the complications and reoperation rate of MISD procedures in these patients. Data of 28 patients submitted to MISD for DS associated to LSS were reviewed. We evaluated the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) both for low back pain (LBP) and legs pain, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the degree of the slippage. A PubMed search of the English literature was condu...
Source: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Neurol Neurochir Pol Source Type: research
Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is a frequent cause of low back pain among adults, caused by a narrowing impinging on the spinal cord or nerve roots. Several conditions cause LSS, including disc herniation, spondylolisthesis, tumor, fractures, and other degenerative changes. Back pain is frequently experienced. MRI is the radiologic modality of choice. Radiographic evidence of LSS may not correlate well with symptoms. An increase in utilization of surgery has been noted. However, surgery has no significant benefit over more conservative options. An appropriate risk/benefit discussion between the patient and an interdisciplina...
Source: Rheumatic Disease Clinics of North America - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Source Type: research
Decompression surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is the most common spinal procedure in the elderly. To avoid persisting low back pain, adding arthrodesis has been recommended, especially if there is a coexisting degenerative spondylolisthesis. However, this strategy remains controversial, resulting in practice-based variation.
Source: The Spine Journal - Category: Orthopaedics Authors: Tags: Clinical Study Source Type: research
Conclusion. This population-based cohort study revealed that lumbar spondylolisthesis had a closer association with leg symptoms than with low back pain. There was a significant difference in the presence of symptomatic LSS between participants with and without spondylolisthesis. However, the amount of slippage was not related to the presence of symptomatic LSS. Level of Evidence: 3
Source: Spine - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Epidemiology Source Type: research
Conclusion. Although the causes of LBP are varied in each patients, our results show that concomitant LSS itself might cause LBP in some patients with grade I LDS, because it involves impingement of the neural tissue and discordant sagittal lumbopelvic alignment. Level of Evidence: 3
Source: Spine - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Clinical Case Series Source Type: research
More News: Back Pain | Brain | Japan Health | Low Back Pain | Lumbar Spinal Stenosis | Neurology | Neurosurgery | Orthopaedics | Pain | Spondylolisthesis | Statistics | Study