Alterations in responses to vaccines in older people.

[Alterations in responses to vaccines in older people]. Rev Mal Respir. 2019 Sep 12;: Authors: Autran B Abstract The aging population raises a number of public health issues including a need to address the severity and frequency of infections observed in older people. Vaccines play an important role in prevention. However, immunosenescence alters the intensity and quality of vaccine responses, thus limiting the impact of recommendations directed after 65 years for vaccination against flu, pneumococci, pertussis, tetanus and zoster. Immunosenescence, aggravated by co-morbidities, varies with age, becoming apparent after 60-65 years and more profound after 85 years. All stages of vaccine responses are affected by immunosenescence, from the innate immunity required to activate these responses to the induction of protective antibody responses and immune memory. Nevertheless, the capacity to develop new responses to primary vaccination is more affected than the ability to respond to recalls, although this is also impaired. Responses to vaccines are differentially altered depending on vaccine and age. Influenza vaccines are modestly immunogenic and several meta-analyses agree an estimate for efficacy of about 50% against virologically-proven flu and 40% against flu-related deaths. The anti-pneumococcal 23-valent non-conjugated vaccine does not induce memory while the 13-valent conjugated one does, but their efficacy are likely to be similar between 70 to 52% be...
Source: Revue des Maladies Respiratoires - Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Rev Mal Respir Source Type: research

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Abstract Despite recommendations for vaccinating adults and widespread availability of immunization services (e.g., pharmacy venues, workplace wellness clinics), vaccination rates in the United States remain low. The U.S. National Adult Immunization Plan identified the development of quality measures as a priority and key strategy to address low adult vaccination coverage rates. The use of quality measures can provide incentives for increased utilization of preventive services. To address the lack of adult immunization measures, the National Adult and Influenza Immunization Summit, a coalition of adult immunizatio...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
ConclusionsSurvey-based vaccination data may under- or over-estimate coverage, but most adults require at least one additional vaccination by any metric. A composite measure provides a single focal point to promote adherence to standards of care.
Source: American Journal of Preventive Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
The objective of this study was to describe clinicians’ and pharmacists’ self-reported implementation of the Standards for Adult Immunization Practice (“the Standards”; i.e., routine assessment, recommendation, and administration/referral for needed vaccines, and documentation of administered vaccines, including in immunization information systems).MethodsTwo Internet panel surveys (one among clinicians and one among pharmacists) were conducted during February–March 2017 and asked respondents about their practice’s implementation of the Standards. T-tests assessed associations between cl...
Source: American Journal of Preventive Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Active promotion and information regarding beneficial role of immunizations among IBD patients and other chronically ill individuals significantly improves the quality of care. It is important to explain misconceptions about vaccines by the most reliable sources. We propose implementing an uniformed "immunization chart" for every chronically ill individual. PMID: 30024696 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Acta Gastroenterol Belg Source Type: research
Discussion Vaccines are a mainstay of infectious disease prevention and health promotion. Infants, children and adults benefit from vaccines the most when they are given on the recommended schedules. However there are times when this is not possible as children come to the physician a little early, or a little late, or had unavailable records and so received addition vaccine, etc. There are many questions that arise because of these timing issues such as the one above. Standard vaccine schedules can be reviewed here. Commonly administered vaccines includes: Live-attenuated vaccines Cholera Measles, mumps, rubella (MMR ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Date: May 7, 2018 Issue #:  1546Summary:  The US Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends routine use of the following vaccines in adults residing in the US: influenza, tetanus/diphtheria alone (Td) and in combination with acellular pertussis (Tdap), measles/mumps/rubella (MMR), varicella (VAR), herpes zoster (RZV; ZVL), human papillomavirus (HPV), and pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13) and polysaccharide (PPSV23) vaccines. For adults with certain medical conditions or occupational, behavioral, or other risk factors, hepatitis A (HepA), hepatitis B (HepB), meningococcal (MenAC...
Source: The Medical Letter - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: ActHIB Avaxim Bexsero Boostrix Cervarix diphtheria Engerix-B Gardasil Gardasil9 Genital warts Haemophilus infuenzae Havrix hepatitis a hepatitis b Heplisav-B Hiberix HPV vaccine Influenza vaccine measles Menactra Me Source Type: research
go JA Abstract Longer life expectancy and decreasing fertility rates mean that the proportion of older people is continually increasing worldwide, and particularly in Europe. Ageing is associated with an increase in the risk and severity of infectious diseases. These diseases are also more difficult to diagnose and manage in seniors who often have at least one comorbid condition (60% of seniors have two or more conditions). Infectious diseases increase the risk of hospitalization, loss of autonomy and death in seniors. Effective vaccines are available in Europe for infectious diseases such as influenza, pneumococc...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
Abstract PURPOSE: The aims of this study are to evaluate the impact of a novel immunization curriculum based on the Preferred Cognitive Styles and Decision Making Model (PCSDM) on internal medicine (IM) resident continuity clinic patient panel immunization rates, as well as resident immunization knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP). METHODS: A cluster-randomized controlled trial was performed among 143 IM residents at Mayo Clinic to evaluate the PCSDM curriculum plus fact-based immunization curriculum (intervention) compared to fact-based immunization curriculum alone (control) on the outcomes of residen...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
Abstract Vaccines are important for preventing infections in adults aged ≥65 years. Older adults are at increased risk for complications from vaccine-preventable illnesses due to age-associated changes in immune function and chronic medical comorbidities. Vaccination rates for older adults remain low despite widely accepted practice guidelines. Recommended vaccinations for older adults include (1) influenza; (2) pneumococcal; (3) herpes zoster; (4) tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis; and (5) hepatitis B. Cost influences vaccination rates in older adults. PMID: 29129213 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Herpes - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Clin Geriatr Med Source Type: research
Vaccines are important for preventing infections in adults aged ≥65 years. Older adults are at increased risk for complications from vaccine-preventable illnesses due to age-associated changes in immune function and chronic medical comorbidities. Vaccination rates for older adults remain low despite widely accepted practice guidelines. Recommended vaccination s for older adults include (1) influenza; (2) pneumococcal; (3) herpes zoster; (4) tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis; and (5) hepatitis B. Cost influences vaccination rates in older adults.
Source: Clinics in Geriatric Medicine - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: research
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