497 FOXP3 and CTLA-4 genetic variants influence on the susceptibility and clinical course of basal cell carcinoma

The pathogenesis of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is multifactorial and not fully elucidated. Previous studies showed, that behaviour of the tumour may be influenced by immune system and identified CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) as a dominant immune cells in BCC microenvironment. The function and development of Tregs is regulated by FOXP3 encoding transcription factor, Forkhead box P3 (FoxP3). FoxP3 regulates transcription of many genes, including up-regulation of cytotoxic lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 gene (CTLA-4).
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Melanoma and Other Skin Cancers Source Type: research

Related Links:

Authors: deShazo R, Soltani-Arabshahi R, Krishnasamy S, Langley RG, Kalia S, Ståhle M, Langholff W, Goyal K, Fakharzadeh S, Galindo C, Srivastava B, Krueger G Abstract To the Editor: Patients with psoriasis are at increased risk of developing non melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC).1,2 The risk is especially elevated among those who previously received systemic treatment or phototherapy.2 Systemic treatments, including biologic therapies and methotrexate (MTX), are effective in managing immune-mediated diseases; however, they may increase suscept...
Source: Journal of Drugs in Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Tags: J Drugs Dermatol Source Type: research
Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common cancer worldwide. Australia has the highest incidence of skin cancer in the world, exceeding 2000 per 100  000 person-years and it is increasing [1]. In the USA, more than 3 million individuals are diagnosed with NMSC each year [2,3]. In the UK, during 2014–2016, about 147 000 new NMSC cases were diagnosed every year, more than 400 every day [4]. Data show that between 1976 and 1984, the overall inc idence of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) increased by 145% and of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) by 263%.
Source: Clinical Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
ConclusionThe results of this exploratory analysis of vismodegib withdrawal are consistent with a substantial link between treatment response and patients ’ HRQoL. Furthermore, 11 out of 35 (31%) patients that reported a complete remission of the disease after 6 months of vismodegib treatment reported BCC recurrence. These data highlight the importance of continuous follow-up and perhaps different regimens of treatment, such as an alternate dose re gimen to maintain disease control and reduce the adverse events as previously described in the literature.
Source: Dermatology and Therapy - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Transplant recipients have a significantly higher risk of developing non-melanoma skin cancers compared with the general population and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) are the most common post-transplant malignancies. Although in the general population BCC outnumbers SCC 4:1, in transplant patients this ratio is reversed and SCC is more common, with a 65- to 250-fold increased incidence. As patients in immunosuppressed states are living longer after transplants, the incidence of skin cancer in this population continues to increase.
Source: Clinical Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Overview Source Type: research
Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor has been associated with lower risk of several cancers, but epidemiological studies on skin cancer risk have been limited and inconclusive. COX-2 inhibitor use and risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC), and melanoma were evaluated in three prospective cohorts - the Nurses ’ Health Study (NHS, 2000-2012), NHS II (2001-2011), and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS, 2002-2012). COX-2 inhibitor use and skin cancer incidence were assessed using biennial questionnaires, with cSCC and melanoma cases verified by pathological records.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Clinical Research and Epidemiology Source Type: research
Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) environment consists of stromal and inflammatory cells which produce variety of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors that may affect the tumor behavior. One of the cytokines suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of BCC is IL-6 - the upstream element of IL-6/JAK/STAT3 pathway. In the present study rs1800795 (-174 G/C) IL-6 gene polymorphism and STAT3 rs2293152 (intron 11, C/G) and rs4796793 ( –1697, C/G) polymorphisms were assessed in relation to the BCC risk and clinical course.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Melanoma and Other Skin Cancers Source Type: research
Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cutaneous neoplasia in fair-skinned individuals usually characterized by locally destructive growth and invasion of surrounding tissue. BCC is primarily driven by the aberrant activation of the Sonic Hedgehog pathway (HH), with the majority of BCCs carrying mutations in PTCH1 or SMO genes. However, the great variability in morphology, aggressiveness and response to treatment of BCC remains unexplained and highlights the hypothesis that additional genes might contribute to tumorigenesis of different BCC subtypes.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Melanoma and Other Skin Cancers Source Type: research
Basosquamous carcinoma (BSC) is an aggressive skin neoplasm with features of both basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). While genetic and molecular drivers of BCC and SCC development have been extensively characterized, BSC pathogenesis remains unclear, in particular regarding the reprogramming of tumor keratinocytes towards basaloid or squamatized phenotypes. Here, by analogy to pathway switching previously observed in BCC escaping Hedgehog (Hh) inhibition, we demonstrate loss of Hh signaling and MAPK pathway activation associated with squamatization of BSC.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Melanoma and Other Skin Cancers Source Type: research
We aimed to:1) Analyse telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) mutations in cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (CBC) tumours and describe its relationship with intra-tumour enzyme activity and telomere length (TL). 2) Compare TERT activity between tumour and clinically healthy peritumoral skin. 3) Compare TL between CBC and peripheral blood. A cohort of 45 patients with 50 CBC were included. All tumours were located in the neck, face or scalp. Usual clinicopathological variables were recorded for each patient and tumour.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Melanoma and Other Skin Cancers Source Type: research
Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC) is known to rely heavily on its underlying mesenchyme but little is understood regarding how the various cell types interact. Histological and gene expression changes in the dermis surrounding the tumour have been reported in BCCs as compared to normal skin. Targeting the tumour-stroma interactions may therefore be a viable strategy in controlling BCC onset. We here performed RNA sequencing on sorted CD26+ BCC associated fibroblasts (BAFs) in the BCC niche to examine their impact on tumour development.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Melanoma and Other Skin Cancers Source Type: research
More News: Basal Cell Carcinoma | Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Carcinoma | Dermatology | Genetics | Melanoma | Skin | Skin Cancer | Study