Summary of the clinical practice guideline for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in adults.

The American Psychological Association (APA) developed a clinical practice guideline (CPG) to provide recommendations on psychological and pharmacological treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in adults. This paper is a summary of the CPG, including the development process. Members of the guideline development panel (GDP) used a comprehensive systematic review conducted by the Research Triangle Institute-University of North Carolina Evidence-based Practice Center (RTI-UNC EPC) as its primary evidence base (Jonas et al., 2013). The GDP consisted of health professionals from psychology, psychiatry, social work, and family medicine as well as community members who self-identified as having had PTSD. PTSD symptom reduction and serious harms were selected by the GDP as critical outcomes for making recommendations. The GDP strongly recommends use of the following psychotherapies/interventions (in alphabetical order) for adults with PTSD: cognitive–behavioral therapy, cognitive processing therapy, cognitive therapy, and prolonged exposure therapy. The GDP conditionally recommends the use of brief eclectic psychotherapy, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR), and narrative exposure therapy (NET). For medications, the GDP conditionally recommends the following (in alphabetical order): fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, and venlafaxine. There is insufficient evidence to recommend for or against offering Seeking Safety, relaxation, risperidone, and to...
Source: American Psychologist - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Related Links:

Although trauma-focused cognitive behavior therapy (TF-CBT) is the frontline treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), up to one-half of patients are treatment nonresponders. To understand treatment nonresponse, it is important to understand the...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news
As the COVID-19 pandemic and its economic effects spread, concerns about mental health impacts continue to grow. For example, we worry for health and human services professionals whose duties involve higher risk for trauma exposure and post-traumatic stress. Reports of global increases in family violence also suggest that there will be many violence victims and witnesses in need of mental health support. Add to this the potential effects of social isolation, health-related anxiety, and that these mental health problems may persist and worsen long after society goes back to “normal.” And this is all happening as...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Stress Suicide coronavirus COVID-19 Depression pandemic Task sharing Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: Most studies were of poor quality and results should be interpreted with caution. Overall moderate effects were found which decreased substantially when interventions were compared to active control. It is unclear whether meditation, yoga or mindfulness affect academic achievement or affect have any negative side effects. Introduction Rationale Every 12 months, between 7 and 16% of students in tertiary education experience a mood or anxiety disorder and a further 30% of students report experiencing moderate to severe levels of stress (1–4). It is important to tackle poor mental health early as ...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
DiscussionThe expected results will be a major step forward in establishing empirically supported psychological treatments for survivors of CA suffering from Complex PTSD.Trial registrationGerman Clinical Trials Register: registration numberDRKS00005578, date of registration 19 December 2013.
Source: Borderline Personality Disorder and Emotion Dysregulation - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
This study supports existing research showing promise for the application of rt-fMRI neurofeedback in the treatment of problems like PTSD, addiction and depression that are associated with heightened amygdala activation. The clinical potential of this technique, bridging the worlds of neurobiology and psychotherapy, is clear. That said, fMRI scanning is an expensive business, so it may be a while before a new world of personalised mental health interventions reveals itself. —Training emotion regulation through real-time fMRI neurofeedback of amygdala activity Post written by Eleanor Morgan (@eleanormorgan) for B...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Brain guest blogger Mental health Source Type: blogs
BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder (MDD) has a highly recurrent nature. After successful treatment, it is important to identify individuals who are at risk of an unfavorable long-term course. Despite extensive research, there is no consensus yet on the ...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news
This article will review recent developments in psychopharmacology for PTSD, with a focus on current clinical data that apply putative neurobiologic mechanisms to medication use—i.e., a theranostic approach. A theranostic approach however, also requires consideration of timing, pre, peri or post trauma in conjunction with underlying dynamic processes affecting synaptic plasticity, the HPA axis, hippocampal activation, PFC-amygdala circuitry and fear memory.
Source: Progress in Neuro Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
For something so common, anxiety is still massively misunderstood. There are myths and misconceptions about everything from what anxiety disorders look and feel like to what actually helps to treat these illnesses and navigate anxiety. Which is why we asked several anxiety experts to clear things up. Below, you’ll find their illuminating insights. Living with an anxiety disorder can be exceptionally difficult. Many people minimize and trivialize anxiety disorders. For instance, how often have you said or heard someone say “I’m sooo OCD about my desk!” or “I’m really OCD about using hand ...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Anxiety Cognitive-Behavioral Disorders General Psychotherapy Self-Help Stress Treatment Anxiety Disorder Treatment Anxiety Disorders Cbt exposure and response prevention therapy GAD Ocd Source Type: news
Look into my eyes. The phrase calls to mind images of a psychotherapist swinging a pocket watch. Or maybe you picture Catherine Keener in the film Get Out, tapping her teacup and sending an unwilling man into a state of hypnotic limbo. “There are many myths about hypnosis, mostly coming from media presentations,” like fictional films and novels, says Irving Kirsch, a lecturer and director of the Program in Placebo Studies at Harvard Medical School. But setting aside pop culture clichés, Kirsch says hypnosis is a well-studied and legitimate form of adjunct treatment for conditions ranging from obesity and...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news
Suicide remains a significant public health problem for the United States military. Trauma-related diagnoses such as acute stress disorder (ASD) or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may exacerbate suicide risk, particularly among service members psychiatrically hospitalized following suicide-related events. To date, treatments to address suicide risk and trauma symptomatology among service members within inpatient milieus have been nonexistent. To address this gap, a randomized controlled pilot trial of Post-Admission Cognitive Therapy (PACT) was conducted to evaluate a targeted cognitive-behavioral program among trauma...
Source: Psychological Services - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
More News: Cognitive Behavior Therapy | Databases & Libraries | Effexor | Fluoxetine | Paroxetine | Paxil | Post Traumatic Stress Disorder | Prozac | Psychiatry | Psychology | Psychotherapy | Risperdal Consta | Sertraline | Study | Topamax | Zoloft