Raymond Allen Weiss (1916–2019).
Presents the obituary of Raymond Allen Weiss (1916–2019). The lion’s share of his academic career was spent at NYU (1949 –1981), where Raymond progressed through the faculty ranks, including serving as Department Chair. His academic work was heavily influenced by his military service during World War II, for which Raymond received a commendation for meritorious service in 1945. After retiring from NYU at the age of 65 and following the completion of a 2-year clinical psychology internship, Raymond became a licensed psychologist on February 27, 1984. Raymond was a Charter member of and a Fellow in the Amer...
Source: American Psychologist - July 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Thomas John Kehle (1943–2018).
Presents the obituary of Thomas John Kehle (1943–2018). Tom was born in Toledo, Ohio, on July 15, 1943, where he had many fond memories of his boyhood experiences, portrayed in his published short story The Park. He moved to Pompano Beach, Florida, as a teenager, where he met his wife, Gretchen Koll. He then joined the U.S. Army, later joining the police force as an officer. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Florida Atlantic University and his master’s and PhD (1972) degrees (Jim Barclay was his mentor) from the University of Kentucky. Upon graduation, Tom worked for the Louisville Public Schools as a ...
Source: American Psychologist - July 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

William D. Timberlake (1942–2019).
Presents the obituary of William D. Timberlake (1942–2019). William David Timberlake contributed to psychology in many ways. He is best known for his behavior systems approach to learning and for his disequilibrium theory of reinforcement. He also made important contributions to behavioral economics, circadian rhythms, time horizons, adjunctive behavior, and contrast effects. In these pursuits and others, Timberlake brought clarity to vexing theoretical problems through careful attention to the species-typical characters of the subjects and how these interact with the specifics of apparatus and procedures. He focused...
Source: American Psychologist - July 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Zella Luria (1924–2018).
Presents the obituary of Zella Luria (1924 –2018). Zella Luria, a pioneering female psychologist, passed away peacefully on June 10, 2018, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Luria is best known for her work on the development of gender identity and sexuality. Her contributions formed part of a shift in the field at large away from learning theory and toward the cognitive revolution of the 1970s. To friends and colleagues, Zella was also known for her political activism and commitment to social justice. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: American Psychologist)
Source: American Psychologist - July 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Why stop at two opinions? Reply to McCrae (2020).
McCrae (2020) argues that it is premature to explore interventions focused on personality change. In his commentary, he suggests that interventions should be promoted only if their effects in self-report data are confirmed by the additional opinion of informants. We agree with the essence of his position and would go further by envisioning a new framework for rigorous collaborative research on personality change (Bleidorn et al., 2020). We nevertheless maintain that policymakers would benefit from considering the additional opinion of personality scientists. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved) (Sou...
Source: American Psychologist - July 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Get a second opinion: Comment on Bleidorn et al. (2019).
Bleidorn et al. (2019) argued that personality traits, as important determinants of life outcomes, should be the object of treatment interventions. They suggested that self-reports on standard personality questionnaires provide necessary and sufficient evidence of trait change. However, the self-concept—on which self-reports are based—may change without any alteration in the underlying trait. Additional evidence, such as that provided by independent informant ratings, is needed, and multimethod assessments should be a feature of all studies of trait change. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights res...
Source: American Psychologist - July 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Clarifying what forward flow is (and isn't): Reply to Rossiter (2020).
Forward flow is a new measure that quantifies free thought and predicts creativity (Gray et al., 2019). In his comment, Rossiter (2020) raises some conceptual and measurement concerns about this measure. We believe these concerns are specious, resting on fundamental misunderstandings about our aim and approach. This reply clarifies the nature of forward flow and dispels these concerns. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: American Psychologist)
Source: American Psychologist - July 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Forward flow—An alternative interpretation: Comment on Gray et al. (2019).
Gray et al. (2019) proposed a new construct to predict creativity, which they called forward flow, measured as the originality of chained word associations. Chained word associations, however, do not meet the requirements of a test of originality. The items ask for only 1 response when multiple responses are needed to assess originality, and the sequential responding means that the items are not independent as required for a test. Also, the originality of the associations is questionably calculated from the starting word instead of in relation to the preceding cue word. Probably because of these problems, scores on the new...
Source: American Psychologist - July 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Summary report of journal operations, 2019.
Presents a summary of data on the journals published by the American Psychological Association. This summary is compiled from the 2019 annual reports of the Council of Editors and from Central Office records. Corresponding figures for 2018 can be found in the July–August 2019 issue of American Psychologist. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: American Psychologist)
Source: American Psychologist - July 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology: Linda M. Woolf.
This award recognizes a significant career of contributions of a psychologist who has a proven track record as an exceptional teacher of psychology. The awardee receives a plaque, a $4,000 award and an all-expense paid round trip to the APA Annual Convention, where the award is presented. Awardees are also invited to give a special address. Respect for diversity, human rights, ethics, critical thinking, and depth of learning are primary to Linda M. Woolf’s philosophy of teaching. For 30 years, Linda has encouraged fellow teachers to integrate issues of social justice and global concerns into their courses—teach...
Source: American Psychologist - July 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in Psychology in the Public Interest: Richard M. Suinn.
This award recognizes a distinguished career and enduring contribution to the application of psychology in the public interest. Richard M. Suinn has made outstanding contributions to the public interest through community service, leadership in professional affairs, and as an innovative pioneer. For the city of Fort Collins, Colorado he served as mayor guiding it to a new performing arts center architectural improvements in the downtown district, and expansion of the library. He was president of APA and the Association for Advancement of Behavior Therapy and chaired nearly every one of six APA governing boards. He has been ...
Source: American Psychologist - July 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology: Phoebe C. Ellsworth.
This award recognizes a distinguished career and enduring contribution to advancing psychological science. Phoebe C. Ellsworth is recognized for her scientific leadership and significant contributions in both basic and applied research. She has provided groundbreaking insights into emotion, tracing the route from cognitive appraisals of events to emotional states. She was in the vanguard of applying psychological science to the law, shedding light on death penalty attitudes, jury decision making, and legal reasoning. Her work and writing are known for their rigor, clarity, and cool-headed wit. Moreover, she has been a wise...
Source: American Psychologist - July 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Applications of Psychology: William E. Cross.
This award recognizes a distinguished career and enduring contribution to advancing the application of psychology through methods, research, and/or application of psychological techniques to important practical problems. William E. Cross is recognized as a leading contributor to the discourse on African American identity development; his identity model has found application across a number of ethnic–racial identity communities. The same can be said of the way he investigates how members of stigmatized groups enact identity in everyday life. In his new text, Black Identity Viewed From a Barber’s Chair (in press ...
Source: American Psychologist - July 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology: Jean A. Carter.
This award recognizes a distinguished career and enduring contribution to advancing the professional practice of psychology through a demonstrable effect on patterns of service delivery in the profession. Jean A. Carter, PhD, is recognized for her many contributions to the practice of psychology, and to practicing psychologists, including her visionary and highly effective leadership that has significantly advanced the practice of psychology. She has generously given of her expertise and wisdom through leadership roles in the American Psychological Association and its divisions, as well as through her compassionate and eff...
Source: American Psychologist - July 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Bringing psychologists to the fight against deep poverty.
This article describes the history, inspiration, goals, and outputs of the 2019 APA Presidential Initiative on Deep Poverty. Historically, psychologists have contributed to understanding the causes and consequences of poverty, as well as in interventions to ameliorate its effects. Less attention has been paid, however, to psychologists’ unique contributions to studying and ending deep poverty, despite psychology’s obvious relevance to the topic. As such, a working group was formed to develop the Deep Poverty Initiative (DPI), which had 3 main goals to engage psychologists in the fight against deep poverty: (a) ...
Source: American Psychologist - July 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Negative cognitive and psychological correlates of mandatory quarantine during the initial COVID-19 outbreak in China.
In conclusion, quarantined participants were more likely than others to perceive discrimination and exhibit mental distress. It is important to integrate mental health care into the planning and implementation of quarantine measures. Future longitudinal studies to explore mechanisms underlying the mental health impact of quarantines are warranted. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: American Psychologist)
Source: American Psychologist - July 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Psychology is an essential science: American Psychologist highlights the role of psychology in understanding and addressing COVID-19.
Psychology has much to contribute in terms of understanding and influencing the impact of the global coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. To disseminate articles on key issues related to the pandemic in a time-sensitive manner, American Psychologist opened its Call for Papers in spring 2020. The journal applied a rapid review mechanism in order to publish articles on important aspects of the pandemic quickly. The response from around the world has been striking. The editors are pleased to publish the first articles in this ongoing series in the current issue. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved) (S...
Source: American Psychologist - July 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and nationwide lockdown on trust, attitudes toward government, and well-being.
The contagiousness and deadliness of COVID-19 have necessitated drastic social management to halt transmission. The immediate effects of a nationwide lockdown were investigated by comparing matched samples of New Zealanders assessed before (Nprelockdown = 1,003) and during the first 18 days of lockdown (Nlockdown = 1,003). Two categories of outcomes were examined: (a) institutional trust and attitudes toward the nation and government and (b) health and well-being. Applying propensity score matching to approximate the conditions of a randomized controlled experiment, the study found that people in the pandemic/lockdown grou...
Source: American Psychologist - June 4, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Ethical considerations for psychologists in the time of COVID-19.
Psychologists are in a position to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic through research, practice, education, and advocacy. However, concerns exist about the ethical implications associated with transitioning from face-to-face to online or virtual formats as necessitated by stay-at-home orders designed to enforce the social distancing required to flatten the curve of new COVID-19 cases. The purpose of this article is to review potential ethical issues and to provide guidance to psychologists for ethical conduct in the midst of the current crisis and its aftermath. In addition to contextualizing relevant ethical considerations...
Source: American Psychologist - May 21, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Risk and resilience in family well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic.
The COVID-19 pandemic poses an acute threat to the well-being of children and families due to challenges related to social disruption such as financial insecurity, caregiving burden, and confinement-related stress (e.g., crowding, changes to structure, and routine). The consequences of these difficulties are likely to be longstanding, in part because of the ways in which contextual risk permeates the structures and processes of family systems. The current article draws from pertinent literature across topic areas of acute crises and long-term, cumulative risk to illustrate the multitude of ways in which the well-being of c...
Source: American Psychologist - May 21, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Global approaches to integrated care: Best practices and ongoing innovation.
The integration of behavioral health in primary care is critical for addressing worldwide concerns for access to, and quality of, health care services for physical and mental health promotion, prevention, and disease management. Clearly, promoting knowledge exchange internationally is critical to progress. In late 2015, the American Psychological Association convened an interdisciplinary summit on global approaches to integrated health care, bringing together 82 health care professionals (nurses, primary care physicians, psychologists, psychiatrists, and social workers) and scholars from diverse disciplines in medicine, ps...
Source: American Psychologist - August 8, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

This is not a drill: Anxiety on Twitter following the 2018 Hawaii false missile alert.
The accuracy of emergency management alerts about dangerous threats to public safety is key for the protection of life and property. When alerts of imminent threats are believed to be real, uncontrollable, and impossible to escape, people who receive them often experience fear and anxiety, especially as they await the threat’s arrival (i.e., incubation of threat). However, what are the consequences when an alert turns out to be a false alarm? We explored psychological reactions (i.e., anxiety) to the 2018 Hawaii false ballistic missile alert using Twitter data from users across the state (1.2 million tweets, 14,830 u...
Source: American Psychologist - July 25, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

In the immediate wake of Hoffman’s independent review: Psychologist and general public perceptions.
This study examined the opinions of psychologists and the public shortly after the IR’s release regarding the roles of psychologists in national security interrogations and other non-treatment-focused contexts. This survey of psychologists (N = 1,146) engaged in treatment-focused and non-treatment-focused activities, and of the general public (N = 522), sheds light on the broader perceptions of the IR’s conclusions, and is relevant in considering future directions for the profession. Results suggest that the public is more accepting of psychologists’ involvement in national security settings, including in...
Source: American Psychologist - July 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Ellin L. Bloch (1940–2018).
Ellin L. Bloch passed away after a brief illness on September 28, 2018. At her death, Ellin was a retired professor in the clinical PhD program at the California School of Professional Psychology, Los Angeles, having been on faculty there since 1995 as a professor, program director, and director of the office of field training. For her community service work, Ellin received an APA Presidential award. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: American Psychologist)
Source: American Psychologist - July 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Reuben J. Silver (1924−2018).
Reuben J. Silver passed away on April 11, 2018, in Wilmington, North Carolina, his home for the last 18 years. He was born to Hyman Jonah Silver and Shaynah Volk Silver in Medway, Massachusetts, on September 12, 1924. Reuben was nationally recognized for his contributions to the professional practice of psychology. Many of his contributions were made when legal recognition for psychology was still in its infancy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: American Psychologist)
Source: American Psychologist - July 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Mary Brown Parlee (1943–2018).
Mary Brown Parlee was a pioneer feminist scholar who made noteworthy and enduring contributions to the study of the menstrual cycle. Parlee died in Somerville, Massachusetts, on June 27, 2018, following a hemorrhagic stroke. Throughout her career, Parlee devoted considerable energy to educating the public about psychology and to correcting misapprehensions about women that the discipline had promulgated. In the late 1970s, she served as an associate editor for Psychology Today, which was then a well-regarded popular scientific publication. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: American Psychologist)
Source: American Psychologist - July 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Fred J. Frese III (1940–2018).
Fred J. Frese III, called a “national treasure” by Mike Hogan, Chair of the President’s New Freedom Commission on Mental Health, died July 16, 2018, at his home in Hudson, Ohio, surrounded by his family. Fred was an extraordinary human being who was diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia and rose to become an influential and accomplished psychologist who inspired all he met. Fred presented Congressional testimony to both Houses of Congress, appeared on several national TV and radio broadcasts, and spoke worldwide. Fred was a fellow of the APA and received the Association's Distinguished Service Award in 19...
Source: American Psychologist - July 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Daniel N. Robinson (1937–2018).
This article memorializes Daniel N. Robinson who passed away in Frederick, Maryland, on September 17, 2018, at the age of 81. An estimable scholar, Robinson authored 18 books, including not only scientifically oriented volumes such as The Enlightened Machine: An Analytical Introduction to Neuropsychology (1980) but also highly praised volumes such as An Intellectual History of Psychology (3rd ed., 1995); Systems of Modern Psychology (1979); and Toward a Science of Human Nature: Essays on the Psychologies of Hegel, Mill, Wundt, and James (1982). Robinson received many honors during his career, including the Lifetime Achieve...
Source: American Psychologist - July 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Harold Mosak (1921–2018).
This article memorializes Harold Mosak (1921–2018), one of more important interpreters of Adlerian psychology, who died June 1, 2018, at the age of 96. Mosak cofounded the Alfred Adler Institute, now Adler University, in Chicago in 1952. He worked with clients and mentored students until his retirement from clinical practice and the classroom in 2015. He was a prolific writer, authoring nearly 200 articles and books about Adlerian psychology. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: American Psychologist)
Source: American Psychologist - July 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The potential role of anxiety sensitivity in the risk for and recovery from heart attacks: Comment on Edmondson et al. (2018).
Edmondson et al. (2018) provided a compelling account of the causes and consequences of patients’ perceptions of enduring somatic threat following a heart attack or related cardiac event. The purpose of the current article is to place some of these observations in the context of research on anxiety sensitivity and its role as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, posttraumatic stress disorder, and negative health behaviors. By doing so, we hope to encourage attention to anxiety sensitivity and associated prevention–intervention strategies for at-risk cardiac patients. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA,...
Source: American Psychologist - July 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Fundamental movement skills training in childhood obesity treatments: Reply to Hyman (2019).
Hyman (2019) provides a commentary on our recent review of behavioral interventions for obesity that highlights an opportunity to intervene with children with obesity to build fundamental movement skills. This suggestion is relatively novel for the childhood obesity intervention field and is deserving of additional research. Future studies should assess the efficacy of fundamental movement skills training to contribute to weight and/or weight-related outcomes in children with obesity as well as consider whether it is best to include fundamental movement skills training as part of, or complementary to, current treatment int...
Source: American Psychologist - July 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Integration of movement competency training to optimize behavioral interventions for child obesity: Comment on Wilfley et al. (2018).
Wilfley, Hayes, Balantekin, Van Buren, and Epstein (2018) provided an important review of behavioral interventions for obesity in children and adults. Although behavioral change interventions are effective in increasing the frequency of exercise behaviors, behavioral treatment providers may not be experts regarding how fundamental movement/motor skills (FMS) deficits (e.g., ability to run, skip, balance, leap, kick, throw, catch, bounce) may hinder obese children from achieving physical activity goals. Prerequisite knowledge and skills are necessary to perform new target behaviors such as increasing physical activity, and ...
Source: American Psychologist - July 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Summary report of journal operations for 2018.
These summaries report Journal Operations for 2018 and Division Journal Operations for 2018. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: American Psychologist)
Source: American Psychologist - July 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Guidelines for Education and Training at the Doctoral and Postdoctoral Levels in Consulting Psychology/Organizational Consulting Psychology: Executive summary of the 2017 revision.
This article provides an executive summary of the American Psychological Association (APA)-approved 2017 revision of the Guidelines for Education and Training at the Doctoral and Postdoctoral Levels in Consulting Psychology/Organizational Consulting Psychology. The guidelines were developed by the Society of Consulting Psychology (SCP), Division 13 of the American Psychological Association, to provide updated guidance and recommendations for education and training of doctoral-level consulting psychologists. This article provides an overview of the complete guidelines, reviews the process by which the guidelines were genera...
Source: American Psychologist - July 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Summary of the clinical practice guideline for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in adults.
The American Psychological Association (APA) developed a clinical practice guideline (CPG) to provide recommendations on psychological and pharmacological treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in adults. This paper is a summary of the CPG, including the development process. Members of the guideline development panel (GDP) used a comprehensive systematic review conducted by the Research Triangle Institute-University of North Carolina Evidence-based Practice Center (RTI-UNC EPC) as its primary evidence base (Jonas et al., 2013). The GDP consisted of health professionals from psychology, psychiatry, social work,...
Source: American Psychologist - July 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Charles L. Brewer Award for distinguished teaching of psychology: R. Eric Landrum.
R. Eric Landrum is an inspiring, passionate teacher, a productive scholar, and a tireless crusader for education. A skilled orator, he works hard to further the craft of teaching, inspiring his colleagues to be the best teachers they can be and motivating his students to learn. Eric is an authority on careers for psychology majors and his know-how on this topic is sought after around the country. His interests in skill development, assessment, and the importance of preparing students for the workforce and arming them with psychological science have resulted in significant changes to the lives of students and educators worl...
Source: American Psychologist - July 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Gold medal award for life achievement in the application of psychology: Bruce E. Wampold.
For achievements in documenting the benefits of psychotherapy and understanding how psychotherapy works, Bruce E. Wampold has examined psychotherapy from the perspectives of psychology, history, anthropology, evolution, and placebo studies to develop a model of how psychotherapy produces beneficial outcomes. His scholarship has documented how humans have evolved to use social means to heal and that psychotherapy makes use of the therapy relationship to promote change. His contextual model of psychotherapy, which is an integration of common factors and specific ingredients and which applies to all forms of psychotherapy, pr...
Source: American Psychologist - July 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Gold medal award for life achievement in the science of psychology: Alan E. Kazdin.
Alan E. Kazdin is recognized for his extensive and influential contributions to psychological science through exemplary research, influential clinical applications, and inspiring professional leadership. His research has brought innovation and rigor to the study of intervention for children’s conduct problems. His Yale Parenting Center has put those interventions into action, demonstrating their realworld relevance. His leadership in founding and editing the major journals of clinical science, and his service as president of our major professional organizations, has spread his scientific and humane values throughout ...
Source: American Psychologist - July 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Gold medal award for life achievement in psychology in the public interest: Janet E. Helms.
Janet E. Helms has made extraordinary contributions in the public interest as a scholar, mentor, and leader. Her scholarship has defined and reframed discourse on race, identity development, psychological assessment, social advocacy, and intergroup communications. Her groundbreaking work on racial identity transformed understandings of identity and culture. She has invited students to challenge their perspectives and has mentored over 50 doctoral students who now seek to advance her legacy. As the Augustus Long Professor and the Founding Director of the Institute for the Study and Promotion of Race and Culture (ISPRC) at B...
Source: American Psychologist - July 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Gold medal award for life achievement in the practice of psychology: Lillian Comas-Díaz.
From teaching public school in Puerto Rico, to community mental health services in Massachusetts and Connecticut, to Yale faculty and clinic director, to cofounding Division 45 and subsequently bringing the journal Cultural Diversity and Mental Health to American Psychological Association to promote ethnocultural psychology academic research and practice, Lillian Comas-Díaz exemplifies improving mental health through ideas and action. Her pioneering theoretical and practical contributions inspire both our and future generations to a higher standard of psychology: They encompass multiple and diverse psychotherapies, ...
Source: American Psychologist - July 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Karen Jill Saywitz (1956–2018).
Presents an obituary for Karen Jill Saywitz, who passed on March 17, 2018. Saywitz devoted her life to advancing children’s mental health and children’s “voice” in the legal system. She completed internship and postdoctoral fellowships at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and became director of child and adolescent psychology at Harbor–UCLA. She returned to the main UCLA campus as professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences. In February 2018, her research, clinical service, and advocacy on behalf of abused children and their families was recognized by the American Psycholog...
Source: American Psychologist - May 9, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Donald E. Polkinghorne (1936–2018).
Presents an obituary for Donald E. Polkinghorne, who passed away on January 17, 2018. He was a gifted teacher and mentor, skilled psychotherapist. Don was hired as The Saybrook Institute’s academic dean in 1975 and became its first president the following year—and served in that position for a decade. Following 3 years as professor of counseling at California State University, Fullerton, he was professor of counseling psychology at the University of Southern California School of Education, from which he retired in 2005. From 2008 until the time of his death, he was a faculty member at Fielding Graduate Institut...
Source: American Psychologist - May 9, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

James (Jim) Georgas (1934–2018).
Presents an obituary for James (Jim) Georgas, who passed away in Athens, Greece, on April 20, 2018. Georgas worked tirelessly at the intersection of cross-cultural psychology and social psychology, and was considered one of the most accomplished cross-cultural social psychologists of his generation. Jim promoted his cross-cultural interests and Greek psychology through various professional positions that he held. These included President of the Hellenic Psychological Society (two terms, 1995–1997 and 1997–1999; honorary president, 1999– 2018) and Professor of Psychology at the National and Kapodistrian Un...
Source: American Psychologist - May 9, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Stanley Moldawsky (1925–2018).
Presents an obituary for Stanley Moldawsky, who passed away on February 9, 2018. Moldawsky was a retired clinical psychologist and an adjunct visiting professor at the Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology (GSAPP) at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. With several close colleagues, he was not only instrumental in establishing the GSAPP but was also tenacious in working to obtain state approval and an academic home for their collaborative aspiration. Combining his passionate love for practice with a deep appreciation for the contributions of education and science, Stan was truly one of professiona...
Source: American Psychologist - May 9, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Dorothy Hansen Eichorn (1924–2018).
Presents an obituary for Dorothy Hansen Eichorn, who passed away on March 22, 2018. Eichorn was a noted developmental psychologist and organizational leader. She was involved in several notable studies in development, but the most significant was probably her role in the Berkeley Growth Study, which continued for five decades. Dorothy was active in several professional organizations, including the American Psychological Association (APA), where she served on its Board of Directors, as well as president of APA Division 7 (Developmental Psychology). She also served as president of the Western Psychological Association. But h...
Source: American Psychologist - May 9, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Beatrice A. Wright (1917–2018).
Presents an obituary for Beatrice A. Wright, who passed away on July 31, 2018. Wright was a pivotal figure whose research and advocacy changed the way psychologists and laypeople understand the experience of disability. A founder and leader of rehabilitation psychology, she demonstrated that physical, social, and psychological environments pose greater challenges for people with disabilities than the disabilities themselves. Wright championed the importance of human dignity for all persons regardless of the nature of their disabilities, arguing they should be partners with professionals when planning rehabilitation regimen...
Source: American Psychologist - May 9, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Complexities in the history of diversity and social justice: Reply to Harvey (2019).
The authors provide a reply to Harvey’s (2019) comment on the authors’ article regarding the American Psychological Association’s efforts to promote diversity and social justice (Leong et al., 2017). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: American Psychologist)
Source: American Psychologist - May 9, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Diversity and social justice? Comment on Leong, Pickren, and Vasquez (2017).
This is a comment on Leong, Pickren, and Vasquez (2017). The current author contends that in using the American Psychological Association’s response to the Hoffman Report as one milestone in the organization’s evolution in the realm of culture, diversity, and social justice, Leong et al. perpetuated a number of mistruths from that flawed document while also highlighting the challenges involved when speaking about a culture different from their own. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: American Psychologist)
Source: American Psychologist - May 9, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

There is still no evidence that physical punishment is effective or beneficial: Reply to Larzelere, Gunnoe, Ferguson, and Roberts (2019) and Rohner and Melendez-Rhodes (2019).
The authors’ original article (Gershoff et al., 2018) summarized the extensive body of research demonstrating that parents’ use of physical punishment is ineffective and linked with risk of detrimental outcomes for children. In this Reply, the authors agree with several points raised in two commentaries on the article (Larzelere, Gunnoe, Ferguson, & Roberts, 2019; Rohner & Melendez-Rhodes, 2019)—that statistical rigor is needed before making conclusions and that potential contextual moderators need to be considered. However, neither commentary negated the scientific inferences and conclusions of t...
Source: American Psychologist - May 9, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Perceived parental acceptance−rejection mediates or moderates the relation between corporal punishment and psychological adjustment: Comment on Gershoff et al. (2018).
Researchers and policymakers are engaged in an ongoing debate over the use of corporal punishment and how it potentially leads to short-term and long-term negative developmental consequences for children. In this comment on Gershoff et al. (2018), the authors provide evidence that children’s perceptions of parental acceptance−rejection often partially—or even fully—mediate or moderate the reported effects of corporal punishment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: American Psychologist)
Source: American Psychologist - May 9, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research