Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Modified T Cell Therapy in Multiple Myeloma: Beyond B Cell Maturation Antigen

Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cell therapy is a rapidly emerging immunotherapeutic approach that is revolutionizing cancer treatment. The impressive clinical results obtained with CAR-T cell therapy in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and lymphoma have fueled the development of CAR-T cells targeting other malignancies, including multiple myeloma (MM). The field of CAR-T cell therapy for MM is still in its infancy, but remains promising. To date, most studies have been performed with B cell maturation antigen (BCMA)-targeted CARs, for which high response rates have been obtained in early-phase clinical trials. However, responses are usually temporary, and relapses have frequently been observed. One of the major reasons for relapse is the loss or downregulation of BCMA expression following CAR-T therapy. This has fostered a search for alternative target antigens that are expressed on the MM cell surface. In this review, we provide an overview of myeloma target antigens other than BCMA that are currently being evaluated in preclinical and clinical studies.
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research

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This study aimed to analyze the role of postoperative treatment for BC in the development of subsequent HM. Using the French National Health Data System, we examined the HM risks in patients diagnosed with an incident primary breast cancer between 2007 and 2015, who underwent surgery as first-line treatment for BC. Main outcomes were acute myeloid leukemia (AML), Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), multiple myeloma (MM), Hodgkin’s lymphoma or non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL/NHL), and acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphocytic lymphoma (ALL/LL). Analyses were censored at HM o...
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
ConclusionThe use of a pediatric-inspired protocol for high-risk AYA ALL patients was effective and well tolerated with improvement in OS and DFS compared with historical data using adult protocols in such populations.
Source: Clinical Lymphoma Myeloma and Leukemia - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
ConclusionThe use of pediatric-inspired protocol for high risk AYA ALL was effective and well tolerated with improvement in OS and DFS compared to historical data using adult protocols in such population
Source: Clinical Lymphoma Myeloma and Leukemia - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients using traditional adult chemotherapy protocols give low overall survival (OS) rates. The purpose of this prospective study was to assess efficacy and tolerability of treatment of AYA patients using a pediatric-inspired protocol modified from the Children ’s Cancer Group 1900 protocol for newly diagnosed high-risk Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL patients. Forty patients with a median age of 18 years (range, 14-34 years) were enrolled in the study. Treatment was effective with a complete remission rate after induction of 9...
Source: Clinical Lymphoma, Myeloma and Leukemia - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: Original Study Source Type: research
Conclusion and Future Perspectives This review illustrates our current knowledge of USP7, including its source and characterization, structure, binding partners and substrates in various biological processes. Besides, how USP7 regulates various aspects of a cell under both normal and pathological states are elaborated in detail. As the processes of ubiquitination and deubiquitination are extremely dynamic and context-specific, a series of studies have linked USP7 to different cancers. The biology, particularly the immune oncology mechanisms, reveal that USP7 inhibitors would be useful drugs, thus it is vital to develop hi...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Conclusions This review describes how leukocyte-heparanase can be a double-edged sword in tumor progression; it can enhance tumor immune surveillance and tumor cell clearance, but also promote tumor survival and growth. We also discuss the potential of using heparanase in leukocyte therapies against tumors, and the effects of heparanase inhibitors on tumor progression and immunity. We are just beginning to understand the influence of heparanase on a pro/anti-tumor immune response, and there are still many questions to answer. How do the pro/anti-tumorigenic effects of heparanase differ across different cancer types? Does...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
In conclusion, CAR-T treatment combined with intratumoral delivery of poly I:C resulted in synergistic antitumor activity. We thus provide a rationale to translate this immunotherapeutic strategy to solid tumors. Introduction Adoptive T cell immunotherapy has been demonstrated to be a new way to fight malignancies. In particular, T lymphocytes engineered to express chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) have shown great promise in treating hematological malignancies (1). CD19-targeted CAR-T cells have been approved by FDA to treat relapsed B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) and Diffuse Large B-cell lymphoma (DLBC...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusions The major challenges in the development of adoptive cell therapy for T cell tumors, as mentioned above, remain fratricide, T cell aplasia and the potential for leukemic transduction or poor T cell function if used in the autologous setting. Approaches to overcome fratricide include the genetic modification and deletion of the T cell antigen in the case of long-term CAR-T cell persistence or regulated CAR-T expression. To ensure restoration of T cell immunity, transient CAR expression can be achieved incorporation of a CAR suicide gene, transient CAR expression using mRNA electroporation, or short-lived NK cell...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Yi He†, Wenyong Long† and Qing Liu* Department of Neurosurgery, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, China Super-enhancers (SEs) refer to large clusters of enhancers that drive gene expressions. Recent data has provided novel insights in elucidating the roles of SEs in many diseases, including cancer. Many mechanisms involved in tumorigenesis and progression, ranging from internal gene mutation and rearrangement to external damage and inducement, have been demonstrated to be highly associated with SEs. Moreover, translocation, formation, deletion, or duplication of SEs themselves co...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Conclusions: CAR T cell therapies have demonstrated the clinical benefits of harnessing our body's own defenses to combat tumor cells. Similar research is being conducted on lesser known modifications and gene-modified immune cells, which we highlight in this review. Introduction Chimeric antigen receptors and engineered T cell receptors (based on previously identified high affinity T cell receptors) function by redirecting T cells to a predefined tumor-specific (or tumor-associated) target. Most of these modifications use retroviral or lentiviral vectors to integrate the construct, and most of the receptors ...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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