Intestinal Trematode Infections.

Intestinal Trematode Infections. Adv Exp Med Biol. 2019;1154:181-213 Authors: Toledo R, Alvárez-Izquierdo M, Muñoz-Antoli C, Esteban JG Abstract Intestinal trematodes are among the most common types of parasitic worms. About 76 species belonging to 14 families have been recorded infecting humans. Infection commonly occurs when humans eat raw or undercooked foods that contain the infective metacercariae. These parasites are diverse with regard to their morphology, geographical distribution, and life cycle, which make it difficult to study the parasitic diseases that they cause. Many of these intestinal trematodes have been considered as endemic parasites in the past. However, the geographical limits and the population at risk are currently expanding and changing in relation to factors such as growing international markets, improved transportation systems, new eating habits in developed countries and demographic changes. These factors make it necessary to better understand intestinal trematode infections. This chapter describes the main features of human intestinal trematodes in relation to their biology, epidemiology, host-parasite relationships, pathogenicity, clinical aspects, diagnosis, treatment, and control. PMID: 31297763 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 16 August 2019Source: International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and WildlifeAuthor(s): Lana Harriott, Matthew Gentle, Rebecca Traub, Rowland Cobbold, Ricardo Soares MagalhãesAbstractThe transmission of zoonotic pathogens associated with wildlife in peri-urban environments can be influenced by the interplay of numerous socioecological factors. Echinococcus granulosus is known to be common within peri-urban wild dog populations however knowledge of the factors that influence its presence is limited. We investigated the demographic distribution of the Index of Potential Contam...
Source: International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife - Category: Parasitology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 15 August 2019Source: Veterinary ParasitologyAuthor(s): Ana Vitória Verde Oliveira Rocha, Brenda Fernanda Sodré Moreno, Aline Diniz Cabral, Nayara Mendes Louzeiro, Leandro Macedo Miranda, Vivian Magalhães Brandão dos Santos, Francisco Borges Costa, Rita de Maria Seabra Nogueira, Arlei Marcili, Márcia Aparecida Sperança, Andréa Pereira da CostaAbstractVisceral leishmaniasis is a zoonotic disease caused by Leishmania infantum for which dogs are the main reservoir. In South America, presence of this disease is expanding along with increasing d...
Source: Veterinary Parasitology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: The VK210 variant is the most frequently observed in the studied region and there is significant genetic variability in the CRR of the P. vivax CSP. Moreover, the antimalarial drug sensitivity profiles of the isolates does not seem to be related to the VK210 subtypes. PMID: 31411308 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Memorias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz Source Type: research
Conclusions: The three-fold hematocrit conversion of hemoglobin estimation is a less reliable method than the measured hemoglobin in anemic children in the study setting.
Source: Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice - Category: Rural Health Authors: Source Type: research
Chagas disease (CD), caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is considered a neglected tropical disease by the World Health Organization. Congenital transmission of CD is an increasingly relevant public health problem. It progressively becomes the main transmission route over the others and can occur in both endemic and non-endemic countries. Though most congenitally infected newborns are asymptomatic at birth, they display higher frequencies of prematurity, low birth weight, and lower Apgar scores compared to uninfected ones, and some suffer from severe symptoms. If not diagnosed and treated, infected newborns...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
by Evan M. Bloch, Zakayo Mrango, Mabula Kasubi, Jerusha Weaver, Aleksandra Mihailovic, Beatriz Munoz, Anna Weimer, Andrew Levin, Laura Tonnetti, Jeffrey M. Linnen, Vanessa Br ès, Douglas E. Norris, Giovanna Carpi, Sheila K. West BackgroundBabesia, a tick-borne genus of intraerythrocytic parasites, is understudied in humans outside of established high-endemic areas. There is a paucity of data onBabesia in Africa, despite evidence that it is regionally present. A pilot study suggested thatBabesia was present in a rural district of Tanzania. Methodology/Principal findingsA cross-sectional study was conducted July-Augus...
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Echinococcosis has led to considerable social and economic losses in China, particularly in the endemic communities of the eastern Tibetan Plateau. In China, human cases of Echinococcus granulosus (sensu stricto)...
Source: Parasites and Vectors - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Short report Source Type: research
The objectives of this study were (i) to develop a reliable method, applicable in biomonitoring, for the rapid detection of infectious oocysts by cell culture of their sporocysts combined with qPCR (sporocyst-CC-qPCR), and (ii) to adapt this method to blue and zebra mussels experimentally contaminated by oocysts with the objective to use these organisms as sentinels of aquatic environments. Combining mechanical treatment and bead beating leads to the release of 84 ± 14% of free sporocysts. The sporocyst-CC-qPCR can detect fewer than ten infectious oocysts in water within four days (one day of contact and three days ...
Source: Applied and Environmental Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Appl Environ Microbiol Source Type: research
Abstract A literature review was performed to define the history of transmission of human parasitic diseases and the evolution of control measures adopted in Sichuan Province during the past several decades. In particular, monitoring data related to soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections collected since 2006 were analyzed to determine prevalence based on the current control measures and strategies. It was observed that high STH infections, existing mostly in hilly and mountain areas where cultural and economic development has been slower than that in the plain areas, present a continuing challenge to the preve...
Source: Acta Tropica - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Acta Trop Source Type: research
Abstract Cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania tropica is increasingly documented in Europe and the Middle East. Besides its specific vector, Phlebotomus sergenti, permissive Phlebotomus sand flies are suspected as potential vectors of L. tropica. We investigated the susceptibility of two widely distributed species, Phlebotomus perniciosus and Phlebotomus tobbi. Laboratory-reared sand flies were infected experimentally with L. tropica strains differing in lipophosphoglycan epitopes, geographical distribution and epidemiology. High infection rates, heavy parasite loads and fully developed late-stage infections ...
Source: International Journal for Parasitology - Category: Parasitology Authors: Tags: Int J Parasitol Source Type: research
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