Guanosine prevents depressive-like behaviors in rats following bilateral dorsolateral striatum lesion induced by 6-hydroxydopamine.

Guanosine prevents depressive-like behaviors in rats following bilateral dorsolateral striatum lesion induced by 6-hydroxydopamine. Behav Brain Res. 2019 Jun 15;:112014 Authors: Marques NF, Binder LB, Roversi K, Sampaio TB, Constantino LC, Prediger RD, Tasca CI Abstract The dorsolateral striatum (DLS) processes motor and non-motor functions and undergoes extensive dopaminergic degeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). Beyond the nigrostriatal pathway, dopaminergic degeneration also affects other brain areas including the pre-frontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus, which have been associated with the appearance of anhedonia and depression at pre-motor phases of PD. Herein, using behavioral and biochemical approaches, we investigated the protective effects of guanosine (GUO) (7.5 mg/kg, i.p.) against emotional impairments and cellular events in cortical, striatal and hippocampal slices of rats submitted to a bilateral infusion of 6-OHDA (10 μg/hemisphere) into the DLS. 6-OHDA-lesioned rats displayed anhedonic- and depressive-like behaviors addressed in the splash and forced swimming tests (at 8 and 21 days after lesion, respectively). In addition, no alterations in motor performance in the open field test and social interaction were observed. Biochemical analyses were performed 22 days after 6-OHDA lesions. 6-OHDA lesion induced hippocampal mitochondrial membrane potential disruption. However, intra-striatal 6-OHDA administration did not alt...
Source: Behavioural Brain Research - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Behav Brain Res Source Type: research

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Lewy body dementia (LBD) is a major public health problem worldwide. Prevalence of Lewy body dementia (LBD) is second only to Alzheimer's disease (AD) among people with neurodegenerative dementia.1 LBD cause earlier mortality,2 earlier nursing home admissions, poorer quality-of-life, higher costs,3 more frequent falls, and more caregivers ’ burden than AD. LBD include two overlapping clinical syndromes, dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Parkinson's disease (PD) dementia (PDD). They cause more frequent and more intense neuropsychiatric symptoms including visual hallucinations, delusions, agitation, and depression than AD.
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Regular Research Article Source Type: research
Lewy body dementia (LBD) is a major public health problem worldwide. Prevalence of LBD is second only to Alzheimer's disease (AD) among people with neurodegenerative dementia.1 LBD cause earlier mortality,2 earlier nursing home admissions, poorer quality-of-life, higher costs,3 more frequent falls, and more caregivers ’ burden than AD. LBD include two overlapping clinical syndromes, dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Parkinson's disease (PD) dementia (PDD). They cause more frequent and more intense neuropsychiatric symptoms including visual hallucinations, delusions, agitation, and depression than AD.
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Regular Research Article Source Type: research
This study sought to investigate what could be learned from how these men have fared. The men were born in 1925-1928 and similar health-related data from questionnaires, physical examination, and blood samples are available for all surveys. Survival curves over various variable strata were applied to evaluate the impact of individual risk factors and combinations of risk factors on all-cause deaths. At the end of 2018, 118 (16.0%) of the men had reached 90 years of age. Smoking in 1974 was the strongest single risk factor associated with survival, with observed percentages of men reaching 90 years being 26.3, 25.7, ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, we found that cofilin competes with tau for direct microtubule binding in vitro, in cells, and in vivo, which inhibits tau-induced microtubule assembly. Genetic reduction of cofilin mitigates tauopathy and synaptic defects in Tau-P301S mice and movement deficits in tau transgenic C. elegans. The pathogenic effects of cofilin are selectively mediated by activated cofilin, as active but not inactive cofilin selectively interacts with tubulin, destabilizes microtubules, and promotes tauopathy. These results therefore indicate that activated cofilin plays an essential intermediary role in neurotoxic signaling th...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Sigma receptors, particularly the sigma-1 receptors, are highly expressed in the CNS. They are intracellular receptors, acting as chaperone proteins. Sigma receptors localize mainly at the mitochondrial-associated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane (MAM). Upon stimulation, they translocate from MAM to plasma membrane (PM) and nucleus, where they interact with many proteins and ion channels. In recent years, significant progress has been made in our understanding of roles of the Sigma-1 receptors in normal and pathological conditions, but more studies are still required for the Sigma-2 receptor. The physiological roles of ...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
In this study, we attempted to investigate the molecular mechanism of dopamine receptors mediated control of DAergic neurogenesis and whether it affects mitochondrial biogenesis in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced rat model of PD-like phenotypes. Unilateral administration of 6-OHDA into medial forebrain bundle potentially reduced tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity, dopamine content in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and striatum region and impaired motor functions in adult rats. We found decreased D1 receptor expression, mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial functions and DAergic differentiation associated wit...
Source: Neurochemistry International - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Albert Sanfeliu1, Karsten Hokamp2, Michael Gill1 and Daniela Tropea1,3*1Neuropsychiatric Genetics, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Trinity Translational Medicine Institute, St James Hospital, Dublin, Ireland2Department of Genetics, School of Genetics and Microbiology, Smurfit Institute of Genetics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland3Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Trinity College Institute for Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, IrelandRett syndrome is a rare neuropsychiatric disorder with a wide symptomatology including impaired communication and movement, cardio-respiratory abno...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Sandip T. Auti and Yogesh A. Kulkarni* Shobhaben Pratapbhai Patel School of Pharmacy &Technology Management, SVKM's NMIMS, Mumbai, India Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an enzyme involved in the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cardamom oil (CO) has been reported to have acetylcholinesterase inhibitory, antioxidant and anti-anxiety effects. Hence, we studied the effect of cardamom oil in aluminum chloride induced neurotoxicity in rats. AD like symptoms were induced in Wistar rats with aluminum chloride (100 mg/kg, p.o.). Cardamom oil was administered concomitantly by oral route at doses...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusion Taken together, evidence from animal and human studies demonstrates that the brain detects levels of circulating nutrients and hormones and consequently organizes an outward response that contributes to the regulation of whole-body glucose homeostasis. However, there are major knowledge gaps about the exact nature of this response and its relative importance compared to peripheral processes. As we have seen, animal studies have provided an anatomical map of CNS glucose regulation and have identified important neurons and neural circuits involved. Additionally, the CNS sensing of key nutrients and hormones has b...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Anna M. D. Watson1,2*, Eleanor A. M. Gould2, Sally A. Penfold2, Gavin W. Lambert2,3, Putra Riza Pratama2, Aozhi Dai1, Stephen P. Gray2, Geoffrey A. Head2† and Karin A. Jandeleit-Dahm1,2† 1Department of Diabetes, Central Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia 2Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia 3Iverson Health Innovation Research Institute, Faculty of Health, Arts and Design, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC, Australia Patients with diabetic hypertensive nephropathy have accelerated ...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
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