Sex differences in long-term quality of life after stroke: influence of mood and functional status

Publication date: Available online 14 June 2019Source: Neurología (English Edition)Author(s): F. López Espuela, J.C. Portilla Cuenca, C. Leno Díaz, J.M. Párraga Sánchez, G. Gamez-Leyva, I. Casado NaranjoAbstractObjectiveTo evaluate long-term quality of life (QoL) in patients who have experienced a stroke and to analyse differences in QoL between sexes.MethodsWe conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional, observational study to gather sociodemographic variables and risk factors; data were also obtained on QoL, mood, and functional status using validated scales. The study was approved by our centre's ethics committee.ResultsOur final sample included 124 patients; mean age was 71.30 ± 11.99 years. In the QoL study, the EuroQol-5D dimensions in which participants presented most problems were anxiety/depression (66.7%) and pain/discomfort (62.2%). We found significant inter-sex differences in the dimensions of mobility and usual activities (P = .016 and P = .005, respectively). Women also achieved substantially poorer EuroQoL-5D index values than men (0.45 ± 0.45 vs 0.65 ± 0.38; P = .013). QoL was found to be associated with dependence for the activities of daily living (r = 0.326; P = .001) and depressed mood (r = −0.514; P 
Source: Neurologia - Category: Neurology Source Type: research

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Authors: Stanton R, Rosenbaum S, Rebar A, Happell B Abstract The association between psychotic illness and poor physical health is now clearly articulated in the literature. By contrast the impact of depression and/or anxiety on physical health is considerably less understood, despite depression being the leading cause of disability worldwide and is associated with significantly higher prevalence of physical comorbidities than found in the general population. An Australia national cross-sectional population-based survey was conducted to ascertain the prevalence of chronic physical health conditions in persons with,...
Source: Issues in Mental Health Nursing - Category: Nursing Tags: Issues Ment Health Nurs Source Type: research
For more than a century, clinicians have noticed a paradoxical phenomenon: certain patients who are taking opioids (which are supposed to numb pain) become more sensitive to pain than those who are not taking opioids. The earliest observation of this phenomenon can be traced back to the British physician Sir Clifford Allbutt, who, in 1870, described it: “at such times I have certainly felt it a great responsibility to say that pain, which I know is an evil, is less injurious than morphia, which may be an evil. Does morphia tend to encourage the very pain it pretends to relieve?” Research studies and clinical ob...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Pain Management Source Type: blogs
You're reading 5 Surprising Things Stress Can Do to Your Body, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. You just got off a terrible meeting, your boss gave you an impossible deadline for the next project, your team is pushing you to make extra hours, and you still need to pick up the kids at school. Your body is in a “fight or flight response.” Your stress levels are high, you feel your breath get quicker and even feel your heart beating faster than usual. Although this is all a natural response from y...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: featured health and fitness self improvement stress Source Type: blogs
Abstract Background: Chronic migraine with medication overuse headache (CM-MOH) is the most common type of chronic migraine, and it increases risk of stroke and white matter lesions. These pathologic changes could induce cognitive decline. However, the alteration of cognitive function in CM-MOH patients is not established. Therefore, we took this study to reveal the cognitive performances in CM-MOH. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted between December 2015 and January 2017. Patients were divided into CM-MOH, CMwoMOH (chronic migraine without medication overuse), and MO (migraine without aura) gr...
Source: Pain Research and Management - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Pain Res Manag Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
In this study, we assessed the relationship of ΔHR (difference between resting HR and HRt) and recovery from SRC. Using a retrospective cohort design, we compared acutely (30 days) in RG (p = 0.01) and PG (p = 0.04). A ΔHR of ≤50 bpm on the BCTT is 73% sensitive and 78% specific for predicting prolonged recovery in concussed adolescents who were prescribed the current standard of care (i.e., cognitive and physical rest). Introduction Sport-related concussion (SRC), a type of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), is a significant public health concern (1, 2). Concussion is defined as reversible neurolog...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Joong-Goo Kim1,2, Han-Bin Lee2 and Sang-Beom Jeon2* 1Department of Neurology, Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju, South Korea 2Department of Neurology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea Objectives: The use of dexmedetomidine and ketamine (DEX–KET) combination for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sedation has not been evaluated. We investigated the efficacy and safety of DEX–KET for sedation of patients undergoing MRI of the brain. Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted to compare the DEX–KET combination and midazolam for MRI sed...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 18 April 2019Source: Journal of Sport and Health ScienceAuthor(s): Xin Luan, Xiangyang Tian, Haixin Zhang, Rui Huang, Na Li, Peijie Chen, Ru WangAbstractA growing understanding of the benefits of exercise over the past few decades has prompted researchers to take an interest in the possibilities of exercise therapy. Because each sport has its own set of characteristics and physiological complications that tend to appear during exercise training, the effects and underlying mechanisms of exercise remain unclear. Thus, the first step in probing exercise effects on different diseases is the s...
Source: Journal of Sport and Health Science - Category: Sports Medicine Source Type: research
In conclusion, our data show some of the brain modifications probably responsible for the behavioral phenotype associated with TBI and suggest the CBD as a pharmacological tool to improve neurological dysfunctions caused by the trauma. Introduction The phytocannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD), the major non-psychoactive constituent of Cannabis sativa, exhibits a broad spectrum of potential therapeutic properties, including neuroprotective effects in Central Nervous System (CNS) disorders (Fernández-Ruiz et al., 2013; De Gregorio et al., 2018; Schonhofen et al., 2018). Through a multitarget mechanism, CBD shows pot...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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