Medtech Leaders Discuss Snakebite App and Other AI Opportunities

At AdvaMed's recent Digital Medtech Conference, held at a conference center nestled inside San Francisco's growing UCSF Mission Bay campus, AdvaMed Chief Strategy Officer Andrew Fish asked for a show of hands: how many of your companies develop products that use artificial intelligence? About 75% of the crowd raised their hands. For years, many have looked to AI and machine learning as keys to transforming healthcare, medical devices included. Today, we're seeing real ground broken, especially in diagnostics and software as a medical device (SaMD). Is AI really ready for prime time in medtech? The panelists in a discussion called "Demystifying AI" discussed the challenges that remain and the opportunities already at work. Adjust Expectations In 2017, Stanford researchers developed an algorithm that can recognize skin cancers with an accuracy rate comparable to dermatologists. In some cases, the machine outperformed humans. Should we expect even greater accuracy for medical devices? The exactness needed for a medtech algorithm depends on intended use, said Sam Surette, regulatory affairs and quality assurance manager for Bay Labs, a San Francisco-based medical technology company that applies AI cardiovascular imaging. Don’t burn out your engineers in a quest for 100% perfection added Pat Baird, senior regulatory specialist and head of global software standards for Philips. Shoot for human-level accuracy first, then aim for slightly bet...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Digital Health Source Type: news

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Conclusions: Anemia on admission was associated with higher mortality and an increased risk of poor outcome in patients with ICH. However, the results were limited by the high heterogeneity of included studies. Prospective, multi-center or population-based, large sample cohort studies are needed in the future. Introduction Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the second most common cause of stroke and a highly lethal disease (1), which still lacks effective therapeutic interventions (2, 3). Although age, baseline ICH volume and neurological status on admission are well-known predictors of outcome of ICH (4), none of t...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Cheng Luo1†, Xiqing Bian1†, Qian Zhang2, Zhenyan Xia1, Bowen Liu1, Qi Chen1, Chienchih Ke3,4, Jian-Lin Wu1* and Yonghua Zhao5* 1State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine, Faculty of Chinese Medicine, Macau University of Science and Technology, Macau, China 2Department of Biotherapy, Shenzhen Luohu People’s Hospital, Shenzhen, China 3Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan 4Biomedical Imaging Research Center, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan 5State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medi...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
This study demonstrated that the incidence of ischemic heart disease and death were three times higher among men with low birth weight compared to men with high birth weight (5). Epidemiological investigations of adults born at the time of the Dutch famine between 1944 and 1945 revealed an association between maternal starvation and a low infant birth weight with a high incidence of hypertension and coronary heart disease in these adults (23). Furthermore, Painter et al. reported the incidence of early onset coronary heart disease among persons conceived during the Dutch famine (24). In that regard, Barker's findin...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
This study showed that potential vicious cycles underlying ARDs are quite diverse and unique, triggered by diverse and unique factors that do not usually progress with age, thus casting doubts on the possibility of discovering the single molecular cause of aging and developing the single anti-aging pill. Rather, each disease appears to require an individual approach. However, it still cannot be excluded that some or all of these cycles are triggered by fundamental processes of aging, such as chronic inflammation or accumulation of senescent cells. Nevertheless, experimental data showing clear cause and effect relationships...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
“Let there be work, bread, water, and salt for all.” — Nelson Mandela Salt: without it, food can seem tasteless. It is the reason sea water burns our eyes and skin. Some people enjoy salt water baths. Is it good for us? Is it not? Do we really know? In modern medicine, we tend to have a generally negative feeling about sodium, the element found in salt. Excessive sodium intake is linked to water retention, and it is also a risk factor for high blood pressure. Both excessive sodium intake and high blood pressure are major risk factors for developing heart failure, and for causing complications in those wit...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Health Healthy Eating Heart Health Source Type: blogs
This study is the culmination of a decade of research that has repeatedly demonstrated that this vaccine can effectively and safely target in animal models what we think may cause Alzheimer's disease. I believe we're getting close to testing this therapy in people." Although earlier research established that antibodies significantly reduce amyloid buildup in the brain, researchers needed to find a safe way to introduce them into the body. A vaccine developed elsewhere showed promise in the early 2000s, but when tested in humans, it caused brain swelling in some patients. The new idea was to start with DNA codin...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study's researchers approached all people turning 85 in 2006 in two cities in the UK for participation. At the beginning of the study in 2006-2007, there were 722 participants, 60 percent of whom were women. The participants provided researchers with information about what they ate every day, their body weight and height measurements, their overall health assessment (including any level of disability), and their medical records. The researchers learned that more than one-quarter (28 percent) of very old adults had protein intakes below the recommended dietary allowance. The researchers noted that older adults w...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
The objective here is a set of tests that (a) match up to the expected outcome based on human trials of mitochondrially targeted antioxidants, and (b) that anyone can run without the need to involve a physician, as that always adds significant time and expense. These tests are focused on the cardiovascular system, particularly measures influenced by vascular stiffness, and some consideration given to parameters relevant to oxidative stress and the development of atherosclerosis. A standard blood test, with inflammatory markers. An oxidized LDL cholesterol assessment. Resting heart rate and blood pressure. Heart r...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
“A bear, however hard he tries, grows tubby without exercise.” – A. A. Milne You don’t need to knock yourself out at the gym each day to reap the many health benefits of daily exercise. With simple planning and a determination to engage in a healthier lifestyle, you can add easy stints of exercise to your schedule without breaking too much of a sweat. Best of all, you may realize some of these 10 health benefits of daily exercise. Exercise elevates your mood When you are physically active, it stimulates brain chemicals that make you feel better and lifts your mood. Some experts say that exercise of ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Habits Health-related LifeHelper Self-Help Source Type: blogs
One of the women I work with wanted to know about the new diet drug called Belviq. The FDA is always approving a new “miracle” weight-loss pill, only to recall it a few years later. To date, at least 34 diet drugs have been taken off the market. Diet pills cause all kinds of problems — heart attack, stroke and psychiatric disorders. And Belviq isn’t any different. Some of its side effects include suicidal thoughts, a racing heartbeat, hallucinations and more… The European Union banned Belviq. The reason? It causes cancer in animals.  And here’s the real irony… Clinical tri...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news
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