$12.5 million grant funds ambitious collaboration shedding light on major diseases

(University of Virginia Health System) A groundbreaking research collaboration at the University of Virginia School of Medicine that is shedding light on everything from cancer to diabetes to cardiovascular disease has received $12.5 million from the National Institutes of Health.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

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Publication date: July 2019Source: Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Volume 119, Issue 7Author(s): Luxian Zeng, Mengyuan Ruan, Junxiu Liu, Parke Wilde, Elena N. Naumova, Dariush Mozaffarian, Fang Fang ZhangAbstractBackgroundAccumulating evidence links excessive consumption of processed meat with an increased risk of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and some cancers. Yet, trends in consumption of different types of processed meat in the United States have not been quantified.ObjectiveThe aim of the study was to characterize trends in consumption of different types of processed meat among US adult...
Source: Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Readers of Clinics in Geriatric Medicine are well aware of the demographic shifts throughout all world populations —industrialized or not—resulting in constantly increasing numbers of old and very-old individuals. Some of this is based upon increased birth rates after the Second World War, but also longer survival resulting from healthier life style and reduction in early deaths from acute illnesses includin g infection, coronary artery disease and cancer. As a consequence, chronic diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerotic vascular disease, arthritis and Alzheimer’s have become more prevalent, as has the...
Source: Clinics in Geriatric Medicine - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Preface Source Type: research
By Christian Jarrett There is increasing recognition that while our personality traits are stable enough to shape our lives profoundly, they are also partly malleable, so that our choices and experiences can feedback and influence the kind of people we become. A new study in the Journal of Research in Personality shines a light on a highly consequential behaviour that captures this dynamic – smoking cigarettes. The results add “… to existing knowledge on the implications of smoking by showing that this behaviour is also likely to alter individuals’ characteristic ways of thinking, feeling, and beha...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Health Personality Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: Copeptin, N-BNP, and cystatin C were associated with incident symptomatic PAD, implying that these biomarkers are sensitive indicators of early subclinical PAD. PMID: 31215249 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Biomarkers - Category: Research Tags: Biomarkers Source Type: research
banes D Abstract RATIONALE: Although there has been a long-standing interest in the human health effects of vitamin E, a comprehensive analysis of the association between circulating vitamin E and long-term mortality has not been conducted. OBJECTIVE: Determine whether serum α-tocopherol (the predominant form of vitamin E) is related to long-term overall and cause-specific mortality and elucidate the dose-response relationships with better quantification of the associations. METHODS AND RESULTS: We conducted a biochemical analysis of 29 092 participants in the ATBC Study (Alpha-Tocopherol, B...
Source: Circulation Research - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Circ Res Source Type: research
Eating right can help keep your body and mind healthy and extend your quality of life. But some older Americans may face barriers to getting enough nutrients or calories. Many ways aging can affect appetite Physiological changes that come with aging can result in reduced calorie needs, which can lead to decreased food intake and altered body composition, even in healthy older adults. This can be compounded by diminished smell and taste, and changes in hormone levels that affect how quickly you feel full. Depression, lack of independence, and social isolation can make food less appealing, further contributing to a less than...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs
Authors: Yimer EM, Tuem KB, Karim A, Ur-Rehman N, Anwar F Abstract The seed of Nigella sativa (N. sativa) has been used in different civilization around the world for centuries to treat various animal and human ailments. So far, numerous studies demonstrated the seed of Nigella sativa and its main active constituent, thymoquinone, to be medicinally very effective against various illnesses including different chronic illness: neurological and mental illness, cardiovascular disorders, cancer, diabetes, inflammatory conditions, and infertility as well as various infectious diseases due to bacterial, fungal, parasitic,...
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
Source: Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition - Category: Nutrition Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 18 June 2019Source: Personalized Medicine UniverseAuthor(s): Minako Abe, Hiroyuki AbeAbstractLifestyle-related chronic illnesses, such as metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, cancer, and dementia are rising at an alarming, epidemic rate. In this modern world of increasing lifespan, we are actually decreasing our health span, placing an undue burden on healthcare costs to society. Modern medicine has largely gotten away from addressing key issues to prevent or even reverse some of these chronic conditions. Yet the evidence for successful interventions in four key areas – nutrition, s...
Source: Personalized Medicine Universe - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Anyone who remembers the days before finger stick blood glucose meters became available to people with diabetes will recall how awful life was for diabetics. All they had was urine dipsticks which were sloppy, yielded only crude non-quantitative feedback on blood sugars, and gave you a gauge of what blood sugars were in the recent past, not the present. It meant that dosing insulin or diabetes drugs was grotesquely imprecise and accounted for many episodes of hypoglycemic coma and acceleration of diabetic complications. It was not uncommon in those days, for instance, for a type 1 diabetic to be blind and experience kidney...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: SIBO bowel flora Inflammation probiotic undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs
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