Fear of cancer recurrence: Mind-body tools offer hope

Every year, there are more adults who have been diagnosed with cancer at some point in their lives. All of them face the uncertainty and fear that follow cancer treatments. Research shows that fear of cancer recurrence interferes with emotional and physical well-being. And it also suggests that mind-body tools can help people who have been treated for cancer regain control. A growing number of cancer survivors Over the past 50 years, the number of adults who have completed primary treatment for cancer has grown steadily. By 2024, an estimated 19 million will be living in the United States, a tribute to rapidly evolving options for diagnosis and treatment. There is a critical need to support survivors as they navigate the uncertainty of post-cancer life. Indeed, if you ask patients, health care providers, and researchers, you’ll find that even the often used term “cancer survivor” has different definitions and connotations. When treatment is over, this doesn’t mean worries are over — not even among people in remission with no evidence of disease. After active treatment concludes, cancer survivors find themselves facing a new, unforeseen challenge: persistent fear and distress regarding their health and future. Survivors may continue to worry about disease recurrence for years after treatment ends. What’s more, their worries often persist at levels equal to that experienced at the time of diagnosis. In fact, 30% to 70% of cancer survivors rep...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Breast Cancer Mental Health Mind body medicine Source Type: blogs

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Healthcare is a human right. No one should be denied the opportunity to see a doctor because of how much money is in their pocket or where they live. Our loved ones shouldn’t die from easily curable diseases simply because they can’t afford medicine. Black lives matter. Why are these controversial statements? Why are we living under an administration that thinks it is politically expedient to rip away our access to basic healthcare? Yes, denying people access to healthcare is the perfect way to accomplish your goals if your goals include severely restricting the flow of health resources to marginalized commu...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Semin Reprod Med DOI: 10.1055/s-0036-1597120Endometriosis is defined as the presence of viable endometrial glands and stroma outside of the uterus. It is a common disease, occurring in 5 to 15% of all women. Endometriosis is associated with chronic pelvic pain and infertility and often requires surgical intervention for definitive treatment. Although it is a benign gynecologic condition, endometriosis shares pathophysiologic features with cancer. In recent years, both histologic and epidemiologic evidence has accumulated, suggesting that ovarian endometriosis may give rise to malignant ovarian tumors, primarily those that ...
Source: Seminars in Reproductive Medicine - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 20 August 2016 Source:Journal of the Chinese Medical Association Author(s): Sen-Wen Teng, Huann-Cheng Horng, Chi-Hong Ho, Ming-Shyen Yen, Hsiang-Tai Chao, Peng-Hui Wang Endometriosis, defined by the presence of viable extrauterine endometrial glands and stroma, can grow or bleed cyclically, and possesses characteristics including a destructive, invasive, and metastatic nature. Since endometriosis may result in pelvic inflammation, adhesion, chronic pain, and infertility, and can progress to biologically malignant tumors, it is a long-term major health issue in women of reproductive age. ...
Source: Journal of the Chinese Medical Association - Category: Journals (General) Source Type: research
CONCLUSION Breast cancer screening for patients before fertility treatments and continual surveillance while on such treatment is highly recommended.
Source: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
In this month’s article, I explore issues relating to the health of women in emerging markets. I will recommend that pharma companies wishing to maximize the opportunity in women’s health need to start from an understanding of how women are viewed by society in these markets and challenge awareness, attitudes and access barriers that can lead to their health outcomes being sub-optimal. As a starting point, it is necessary to establish a working definition of women’s health.  This isn’t as straightforward as it might seem, as women’s health can be considered at multiple levels.  The c...
Source: EyeForPharma - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news
By Stacy Simon The American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology have released a new Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline to help breast cancer survivors and their primary care providers better manage their long-term care. The guideline was published December 7, 2015 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, a journal of the American Cancer Society. It provides detailed recommendations for how and when to test for new or returning cancers, managing side effects, making healthy lifestyle changes, and coordinating care among primary care providers and specialists. The guideline is the third in a se...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Breast Cancer Coping with Cancer Source Type: news
I knew I was pregnant before I even missed my period. I was supremely irritated with myself. Aged 30 and recently separated from the man I'd been with for the past 14 years, I couldn't help but laugh bitterly at the cosmic irony that, in all those years, the one time we managed to slip was just as we'd begun our divorce proceedings. In a perfect storm of upheaval, loss and longing, we had made a human error of miscalculation followed by a false assumption of improbability. When I walked back into the bathroom of my recently purged and lonesome Brooklyn apartment and saw my intuition confirmed with the word "pregnant&...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
The other night, I sat in a restaurant with a group of girlfriends. We shared laughter, good conversation and some great wine. As I looked around, I realized that we were likely to share something else: uterine fibroids. Of the ten women sitting at the table, there was a good chance that seven of us would have uterine fibroids at some point in our lives. Fibroids are noncancerous tumors that grow in the uterus. They may be smaller than a seed or bigger than a grapefruit. A woman may have only one fibroid or she may have many. Depending on their size, number, and location, fibroids can cause heavy bleeding and long menstrua...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Women's Health fibroids uterine fibroids Source Type: news
Conclusion: there is no increased risk of doing the lymph node dissection early on.   Dr. Eggener-CON   Basics Lymph node dissections rarely done, even for large tumors, because there is no proven therapeutic or staging benefit for low risk patients.  A Mayo study revealed no data showing therapeutic benefit in high risk patients.  For clinically node negative high risk patients, there is staging value but no proven therapeutic benefit. Rate of positive nodes is associated with stage and grade; the higher the stage and grade, the more likely there will be positive nod...
Source: Kidney Cancer Association - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: news
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