A Brooklyn Yeshiva Is Responsible for 21 Measles Infections In Growing Outbreak, Health Officials Say

A measles outbreak is spreading within New York City’s Orthodox Jewish community, with 21 cases coming from a single yeshiva in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, according to city health officials. The New York City Department of Health announced Thursday that 121 people have contracted measles since the outbreak began in October, and 31 cases have been newly identified. The vast majority of cases have affected children, particularly in the Borough Park and Williamsburg neighborhoods of Brooklyn. The outbreak’s initial case was acquired when a person visited Israel, where a measles outbreak is in progress, according to health officials. Health officials have worked to promote measles vaccination in the Orthodox community, and in December required students at yeshivas in parts of Borough Park and Williamsburg to stay home from school if they had not received the full course of the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine. There has traditionally been some resistance to vaccines in the insular Orthodox community, though health department representatives said the vaccination rate in this population is roughly equivalent to that in New York City as a whole. About 7,000 children in those communities were vaccinated due to the city’s campaign, health officials said. But at least one yeshiva, Yeshiva Kehilath Yakov in Williamsburg, broke the city’s mandate in January and allowed an unvaccinated, but asymptomatic, student to return to school. The student turned out to...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

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We are in the midst of a measles outbreak here in the US, with cases being reported in New York City, New York state, and Washington state. In 2018, preliminary numbers indicate that there were 372 cases of measles — more than triple the 120 cases in all of 2017 — and already 79 cases in the first month of 2019 alone. Here are four things that everyone needs to know about measles. Measles is highly contagious This is a point that can’t be stressed enough. A full 90% of unvaccinated people exposed to the virus will catch it. And if you think that just staying away from sick people will do the trick, think ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Children's Health Infectious diseases Parenting Vaccines Source Type: blogs
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling This is the time of year when it’s important to think about flu vaccinations. And there’s good reason for that! The flu causes thousands of preventable hospitalizations and deaths each year. But what about other vaccinations? Do you think of them as something for kids? You aren’t alone. And it’s true, a number of vaccinations are recommended for young children as well as preteens and teenagers. These vaccinations have provided an enormous benefit to public health by preventing diseases that were common and sometimes deadly in the past, including polio, rubella, and...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Vaccines Source Type: blogs
Conclusion The message is clear, as far as governments are concerned: the more often something is repeated, the more likely the public will believe it. Or, in the words of Joseph Goebbels, “If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will eventually come to believe it.” [8]   References https://learning.blogs.nytimes.com…history-and-biology-of-vaccines/ http://www.ukcolumn.org/article/magic-madness-governments-nlp-assault-our-minds https://thenib.com/vaccines-work-here-are-the-facts-5de3d0f9ffd0 https://www.popsci.com/16-african-countries-have-overtaken-us-measles-vaccinations https:...
Source: vactruth.com - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Christina England Logical Top Stories Maki Naro NLP truth about vaccines Source Type: blogs
Follow me at @JohnRossMD The United States was declared free from ongoing measles transmission in 2000. So why are we still having measles attacks? An outbreak of measles is currently raging in Minnesota. In 2015, 125 cases of measles occurred in California, and in 2014, 383 people were infected with measles in an Amish community in Ohio. How measles outbreaks happen There are several reasons why we are still at risk for measles outbreaks. Travelers may get infected overseas, and bring the measles virus back into the country with them unawares. The 2015 measles outbreak in Ohio began when two infected members of the Amish ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Travel health Source Type: blogs
The recent rise in the U.S. of vaccine-preventable diseases has been largely blamed on those who refuse to vaccinate their children. Previous analyses have linked anti-vaxxers to certain outbreaks -- like last year's Disneyland measles outbreak -- but there was still some controversy over the connection.  Now a new review funded by the National Institutes of Health has found a correlation between vaccine refusal and the rise of measles and whooping cough (also known as pertussis), two common vaccine-preventable conditions.  Researchers at Emory University and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Healt...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Most of us weigh the risks and benefits of medical procedures prior to obtaining them. We sign an informed consent form with an understanding of the potential harm versus the perceived benefits. In the case of vaccinations, the great majority of parents obtain vaccinations for their children, influenced by the “sales pitch” and “scare tactics” used by physicians. We are assured that the vaccination is safe and will protect us and our children from the various targeted deadly diseases. If we blindly trust our doctors, as I once had, we readily agree. It is important that we think critically before ag...
Source: vactruth.com - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Logical Michelle Goldstein Top Stories autism Centers for Disease Control (CDC) MMR vaccine vaccine injury Source Type: blogs
The University of California will require incoming students to be screened for tuberculosis and vaccinated for measles, mumps, rubella, chicken pox, meningococcus, tetanus and whooping cough under a plan set to take effect in 2017. Currently, the UC system only requires students to be vaccinated against hepatitis B, though several campuses have additional requirements. The plan — designed to help protect the health of students and campus communities — has been in the works for a year. But the need is more pressing than ever, given the current multistate measles outbreak and the re-emergence of other vaccine-pre...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
Fifteen years ago, measles was considered eliminated from the United States. However, in recent weeks the number of people infected with measles has gone up to 78 since an outbreak in California’s Disneyland.  In 2014 alone there were 644 reported cases in the United States. Many of those infected were never vaccinated for various reasons.  One of the primary reasons is parent’s fear or concerns regarding the measles vaccine.  Many people may not realize the devastating effects measles can have and therefore do not fear the disease but tend to fear the vaccine due to hearing about possible side e...
Source: Dragonfly - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Health Literacy/Consumer Health Public Health Source Type: news
When the nation turned our eyes to watch the ball drop in Times Square on New Year's Eve, we saw actress and former Playboy Playmate Jenny McCarthy urging viewers to kiss her on our TV screens. Thousands of people did, and sent her pictures to prove it. That's the nature of being a celebrity, possessing the ability to influence other people's behavior, and therein lies its potential for abuse. The idea that vaccines cause autism has been found to be totally false by doctors and scientists, in the same way almost all sane observers agree global warming is manmade. But thanks to anti-vaccine misinformation spread by some...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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