Cervical Cancer Screenings Save Lives. So Why Aren ’t More Women Getting Them?

The vast majority of cancers do not have one obvious cause, making them complex both to understand and treat. Cervical cancer is one of the few exceptions: “Virtually all” cases are caused by human papillomaviruses (HPV), according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Armed with this knowledge, experts have for decades stressed the importance of regular cervical cancer screenings, which can catch HPV infections and related abnormalities before they develop into deadly disease. And yet many women still don’t get tested as much as they should. The screening rate isn’t entirely clear. A study published last year found that, as of 2014, screening adherence ranged from a low of about 60% for women ages 50 to 65 to a high of 77% for women in their 30s. Meanwhile, a January Mayo Clinic report found that in one Minnesota county representative of many in the Midwest, cervical cancer screening rates were “unacceptably low,” hovering around 54% of women ages 21 to 29 and 65% of women ages 30 to 65. “Most of the cervical cancer cases in our country are either women that have never been screened previously, or that haven’t been screened regularly or that haven’t had follow-up [care] for abnormal results,” says Dr. Kathy MacLaughlin, a family-medicine physician at the Mayo Clinic who co-authored the new report. But why aren’t women getting screenings that could save their lives? Shifting guidelines are part of the proble...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Artificial Intelligence Cancer healthytime Life Reinvented Source Type: news

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Human papillomavirus is the leading sexually transmitted infection with more than 80% of the worlds population exposed to at least one strain during their lifetime. Humans utilize both their innate and adaptive immune system to contain or clear the virus. However, immunosuppressed patients have defects in this process that can result in condylomas, less common HPV related cancers, or cervical dysplasia and cancer at a younger age. Thus, ACOG and the ASCCP recommend more frequent screening Pap smears at an earlier age for those with HIV and those with similar immunosuppression.
Source: Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract Human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted viral infection worldwide, is the causative agent for cervical cancer and attributed to anogenital cancers as well as oropharyngeal cancer. Three effective, safe, prophylactic HPV vaccines have been licensed, and studies have demonstrated decreases in HPV prevalence and HPV-related disease endpoints without evidence of waning protection to date. In the United States, only the 9-valent vaccine, which covers 90% of the cancers attributed to HPV in US registries, is available. Because higher titers are found at younger ages, two rather than thr...
Source: Pediatric Annals - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Pediatr Ann Source Type: research
Cervical cancer disproportionately burdens lower-resourced settings, in which nearly 90% of cervical cancer and cervical cancer –related deaths occur. Targeting human papillomavirus (HPV) by prophylactic HPV vaccination in young adolescent girls and HPV-based screening in mid-adult women offers the most cost-effective strategy to reduce cervical cancer burden worldwide and mitigate the health disparities in cervical cancer burden between low-resourced and high-resourced settings. Political and social will, along with the necessary financial investments, will be necessary to realize the opportunity for significant glo...
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
Authors: Nartey Y, Hill P, Amo-Antwi K, Asmah R, Nyarko K, Yarney J, Damale N, Cox B Abstract Globally, cervical cancer is a major public health issue causing increasing morbidity and mortality especially in low- and middle-income countries where preventive and control measures are lacking. In Ghana, it is the most common cancer among women. Approaches to reduce the incidence and mortality of the disease in Ghana have had little success due to lack of accurate data on the disease among other factors, to inform policies on prevention, early detection, diagnosis and treatment. Additionally, the lack of clear commitme...
Source: Ghana Medical Journal - Category: African Health Tags: Ghana Med J Source Type: research
Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination prevents infection with the types of HPV responsible for the large majority of cervical and anal cancers and precancers, as well as genital warts. Compared to 2016 U.S. national HPV vaccination rates for 13-17 year olds, Indiana lags substantially in HPV vaccine initiation, ranking 46th for females and last for males. However, rates likely vary substantially across Indiana ’s 92 counties. The purpose of this study was to document variability across counties in missed opportunities to initiate HPV vaccination and to identify county-specific correlates of initiation rates among pr...
Source: Journal of Adolescent Health - Category: Child Development Authors: Tags: Research Poster Presentation I: Vaccines Source Type: research
Describe knowledge and risk perception of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) among deaf adults who use American Sign Language (ASL) in comparison to hearing adults in the United States.
Source: Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractCervical Cancer is the second most leading cause of death among Indian women. Infection by human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the major causes of cervical cancer. Two prophylactic HPV vaccines approved and recommended for adolescents and young women in India. However, due to lack of appropriate knowledge, education, resources, and proper communication, these tools have little impact on disease burden. It is important to understand attitude, knowledge, and beliefs of females about HPV, cervical cancer, and HPV vaccine. Hence, the present study aimed to check awareness, educate females about cervical cancer and HPV...
Source: Journal of Cancer Education - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
The objective of this study was to determine if adolescent girls and young women with obesity are less likely to receive HPV vaccination compared with individuals with normal weight.
Source: Womens Health Issues - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Original article Source Type: research
With every passing year, more and more studies and observations demonstrate growing incidence of oral cancer, a decrease in patients’ age, and an increasing number of epidemiological factors. The aim of the study was to determine the level of awareness among undergraduate and graduate university students regarding the incidence of oral cancer linked with viral infections and high-risk sexual behavior, including oral sex. Self-administered questionnaire-based survey was carried out among 196 Polish students aged 19 to 25 years. It was found that the young adults understood the meaning of human papillomavirus (HPV), bu...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology Source Type: research
This study explores the general knowledge of Human Papillomavirus vaccine (HPV) and cervical cancer screening (CCS) among Somali men in the U.S., who are major decision-makers in Somali households. HPV infects both men and women, and causes genital warts and cervical cancer (CC). High mortality from CC persists among minorities due to low uptake of preventive tools. Eleven questions assessed general knowledge of HPV and CCS among 30 Somali male respondents. The knowledge of HPV and CCS by education level, age, and years lived in the U.S., was assessed using the health belief model. Most respondents had no knowledge of HPV ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
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