Are All Oral COX-2 Selective Inhibitors the Same? A Consideration of Celecoxib, Etoricoxib, and Diclofenac.

Are All Oral COX-2 Selective Inhibitors the Same? A Consideration of Celecoxib, Etoricoxib, and Diclofenac. Int J Rheumatol. 2018;2018:1302835 Authors: Walker C Abstract Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been widely used for the treatment of arthritic conditions. Drugs in this heterogeneous class alleviate pain and inflammation by inhibiting cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) inhibition has traditionally been associated with increased gastrointestinal (GI) harm, whereas increased COX-2 selectivity has more recently become associated with greater risk of cardiovascular (CV) harm. When the entirety of data is considered, NSAIDs can be seen to exhibit a range of COX isoform selectivity, with all oral NSAIDs appearing to be associated with an increase in CV events. This review focuses on a comparison of the efficacy and the GI and CV safety profiles of three commonly used NSAIDs-celecoxib, etoricoxib, and diclofenac-using direct comparisons where available. While all three treatments are shown to have comparable efficacy, there are differences in their safety profiles. Both celecoxib and etoricoxib are associated with less GI harm than diclofenac despite the similarity of its COX-2 selectivity to celecoxib. Each of the three medicines under consideration is associated with a similar overall risk of CV events (fatal and nonfatal heart attacks and strokes). However, there are consistent differences in effects on blood pressure (...
Source: International Journal of Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Tags: Int J Rheumatol Source Type: research

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This study examined 103 patients with bipolar 1 disorder who, despite taking a mood stabilizer, experienced frequent relapses. During a 12-month period, the group receiving cognitive therapy had significantly fewer bipolar episodes and reported less mood symptoms on the monthly mood questionnaires. They also had less fluctuation in manic symptoms. It’s normal to panic in the days and weeks your symptoms return; however, as you can see, there are many options to pursue. If the first approach doesn’t work, try another. Persevere until you achieve full remission and feel like yourself again. It will happen. Trust me on that.
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Antidepressant Bipolar Depression General Medications Manic Episode Mood Disorder Mood Stabilizer Relapse Source Type: blogs
A previously healthy, well-appearing 42-year-old female living in a modern, high-rise apartment in downtown Los Angeles calls 9-1-1 at 5:30 am complaining of worsening of a burning, epigastric pain she had been experiencing for the last three days. She reports associated nausea and non-bloody, non-bilious vomiting, and that she couldn’t manage to get comfortable in bed until she finally decided to call for help at daybreak. During her 9-1-1 call, she reports “pain, like heartburn, that just woke me up again and I had to throw up, … and then I was sweating so much.” Using the Los Angeles Tiered Disp...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Exclusive Articles Cardiac & Resuscitation Source Type: news
In a blog post last week, I shared an excerpt from the new book that Paul Cerrato and I just completed,The Transformative Power of Mobile Medicine. Here is a second excerpt from Chapter 3,  “Exploring the Strengths and Weaknesses of Mobile Health Apps.”Even patients who are fully engaged in their own care still need access to medical apps they can trust. The IQVIA Institute for Human Data Science has performed a detailed analysis of the clinical evidence supporting mobile health apps, rating their maturity and relative quality. Its rating scale places a single observational study near the bottom of th...
Source: Life as a Healthcare CIO - Category: Information Technology Source Type: blogs
Our objective is to clarify relationship between reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome and administrating etanercept during puerperium. Several lines of evidence have suggested tumor necrosis factor (TNF) as a mediator of vascular dysfunction associated with estrogen deficiency. A 32-year-old woman resumed etanercept (25 mg/week), a TNF inhibitor, which had been discontinued during pregnancy, because of the deterioration of rheumatoid arthritis. She was admitted to our hospital with upper right quadrant blindness and mild right hemiparesis accompanied by pulsating left occipital pain, which had appeared 4 hours aft...
Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Case Report Source Type: research
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, commonly referred to as NSAIDs, are one of the most common medications used to treat pain and inflammation. Ibuprofen, naproxen, indomethacin, and other NSAIDs are effective across a variety of common conditions, from acute musculoskeletal pain to chronic arthritis. They work by blocking specific proteins, called COX enzymes. This results in the reduction of prostaglandins, which play a key role in pain and inflammation. There are two types of NSAIDs: nonselective NSAIDs and COX-2 selective NSAIDs (these are sometimes referred to as “coxibs”). There has been a growing body ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Drugs and Supplements Health Heart Health Source Type: blogs
What do you love about swimming? For me, I’ve just always loved being in the water and playing games with my friends. Starting from when I was 7 or 8 years old, I walked to our neighborhood pool, met my friends, and we played cards during adult swim, and sharks &minnows when there were enough of us there, and I swam on the swim team until I was 15 years old.  The swimming pool was the fabric of my summer existence. During &after high school, other priorities came up, other sports, other interests, academics and eventually a job.  My first job out of college was with Voyageur Outward Bound School whe...
Source: Mr. Hassle's Long Underpants - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Life Triathlon Training Source Type: blogs
Abstract PURPOSE: Handgrip strength provides a clinically validated marker of overall health and mortality risk. There are however, no multi-national population-based studies investigating the associations between handgrip strength, chronic physical conditions, and physical multimorbidity (i.e., ≥2 chronic conditions). We aimed to assess these associations among community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults using nationally representative data from six in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). METHODS: Cross-sectional, community-based data on individuals aged ≥50 years from the World Health Organ...
Source: European Journal of Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Eur J Intern Med Source Type: research
Abstract In this editorial we comment on the article by Fukushi K et al published in the recent issue of the World Journal of Gastroenterology 2018; 24(34): 3908-3918. We focus specifically on the mechanisms of the anti-thrombotic action of aspirin, gastric mucosal injury and aging-related increased susceptibility of gastric mucosa to injury. Aspirin is widely used not only for the management of acute and chronic pain and arthritis, but also importantly for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarcts and strokes. Clinical trials have consistently shown that antiplatele...
Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology : WJG - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: World J Gastroenterol Source Type: research
Aspirin is best known as an over-the-counter painkiller. But acetylsalicylic acid, as it’s called chemically, has many other health benefits, as well as side effects, in the body that have only become clear in recent years. Here’s what the latest science says about the health benefits and side effects of aspirin, as well as which conditions it may treat and those it doesn’t appear to improve. (If you are taking aspirin for any reason other than for periodic pain relief, it’s best to consult with your doctor to confirm whether the benefits outweigh the risks in your particular case.) How aspirin affe...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Drugs healthytime Source Type: news
You're reading 10 Ways Chronic Stress Is Killing Your Quality Of Life, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Stress is something which is almost unavoidable in modern life. While the right amount of stress motivates individual performance, it is necessary if you could distinguish whether your stress is good or chronic. Chronic stress derives from repeated interaction of the body to intense and stressful situations, contributing to the release of stress hormone. The stress is troublesome when it comes to chronic,...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: depression featured self improvement anxiety bad habits chronic stress Source Type: blogs
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