New Antibiotic Teixobactin Holds Promise Against Resistant Organisms

Researchers at Northwestern University have found and grown a new type of antibiotic that kills many of the deadly antibiotic organisms that are developing today, such as MRSA, tuberculosis, and Clostridium difficile. The antibiotic, dubbed teixobactin, is still in clinical trials with animals. The post New Antibiotic Teixobactin Holds Promise Against Resistant Organisms appeared first on InsideSurgery Medical Information Blog.
Source: Inside Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Infectious Disease Pharmacology antibiotic MRSA resistance teixobactin tuberculosis Source Type: blogs

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Publication date: Available online 21 January 2020Source: Preventive Veterinary MedicineAuthor(s): Laetitia Canini, Benoit DurandAbstractFrance was recognized officially bovine tuberculosis (bTB) free by the European Union in 2001, however an increase of bTB detections has been reported since 2004. Even though the recommended method for bTB control is whole herd depopulation, test-and-cull protocols have been authorized in pilot areas since 2008 and in the rest of France since 2014. BTB impact at the state level and on trade has been thoroughly studied, however the consequences of these control measures at a farm level are...
Source: Preventive Veterinary Medicine - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
In this study, specific primers and MGB probes were designed according to the mutation in PstS1 gene, and a sensitive, specific and rapid real-time PCR assay for M. bovis was established. Then the assay was used to detect M. bovis in simulation samples. The minimum detectable concentration is 101 copies for M. bovis DNA. The standard curve showed correlation coefficient between threshold cycle and PstS1 gene fragment copy number was 0.997 and slope is −3.144. The minimum detectable concentration is 101 cells/ml for simulation sample. In addition, M.bovis strain 93006, 14 clinical BCG stains and 7 clinical M.bovi...
Source: Biologicals - Category: Biology Source Type: research
AbstractA proportion of patients suspected ofClostridium difficile infection are unnecessarily placed in contact isolation. By introducing a random-access glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) test forC. difficile, we aimed to reduce isolation time. In addition, we investigated whether the result of the toxin A&B enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was associated with the decision to initiate antibiotic treatment againstC. difficile. This retrospective pre- and post-implementation study was from June 3, 2016, to June 4, 2018. Pre-implementation, only a NAAT was performed. In the post-implementation period, a GDH test was performed; if positi...
Source: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
ConclusionsTB can have varied presentation and therefore it is essential to keep tubercular infection in differential diagnosis while working up for any infective pathology. Conservative treatment produces good results in vast majority of cases. Surgery is reserved for select indications.
Source: Journal of Clinical Orthopaedics and Trauma - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
A deep-learning algorithm that analyzed chest x-rays was able to predict pulmonary...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Deep-learning algorithm bolsters lung cancer detection AI may help improve sensitivity of ED chest x-ray reads AI model could speed up pneumonia diagnosis in ED AI detects pulmonary nodules on chest x-rays Are studies on AI for tuberculosis really valid?
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news
150 years after Semmelweis advised fellow physicians to sanitize their hands to mitigate the effect of infections, the maintenance of hygiene is still a widespread problem in hospitals and the source of healthcare-associated infections. Now, technological solutions line up against microorganisms, bacteria, and fungi. Here are a few examples. 1 in 9 in-patients will die due to infection According to the US Center for Disease Control, studies show that on average, healthcare providers clean their hands less than half of the times they should. This significantly contributes to the spread of healthcare-associated infections (H...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Healthcare Design Medical Professionals Policy Makers clean digital digital health future HAI healthcare-associated infection hygiene Medicine robot robotics sensors technology trackers wearable Source Type: blogs
Clinical laboratories have implemented rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for the identification of bacterial pathogens, with subsequent improvements in antimicrobial stewardship, but these tests may also have a role in infection prevention. Early identification of pathogens by RDTs should allow faster implementation of infection prevention strategies with the goal of reducing transmission. In this review, we assess the use of RDTs as an infection control tool by exploring their role in screening, as well as diagnosis, of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), carbapenem-resistant gram-negative organisms, Clostridi...
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - Category: Microbiology Authors: Source Type: news
New antibiotics need to be developed urgently to combat 12 families of bacteria, the World Health Organization said on Monday, describing these “priority pathogens” as the greatest threats to human health. The United National health agency said many of these bacteria have already evolved into deadly superbugs that are resistant to many antibiotics. The bugs “have built-in abilities to find new ways to resist treatment” the WHO said, and can also pass on genetic material that allows other bacteria to become drug-resistant. Governments need to invest in research and development (R&D)if new drugs are t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
(Reuters) — Scientists in Britain have found how drug-resistant “superbug” bacteria build and maintain a defensive wall – paving the way for the development of new drugs to break through the barrier and kill the often deadly organisms. In recent decades, bacteria resistant to multiple drugs, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or Clostridium difficile, have grown into a global health threat, while superbug strains of infections like tuberculosis and gonorrhoea have become untreatable. The World Health Organization has warned that many antibiotics could become re...
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Tags: Clinical Trials Hospital Care Source Type: news
Carrie Arnold is a freelance science writer living in Virginia. Her work has appeared in Scientific American, Discover, New Scientist, Smithsonian, and more. Background image: Reprinted by permission from Macmillan Publishers Ltd: doi:10.5923/s.microbiology.201401.02 About This Article open Citation: Arnold C. 2015. Outbreak breakthrough: using whole-genome sequencing to control hospital infection. Environ Health Perspect 123:A281–A286; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.123-A281 Published: 1 November 2015 PDF Version (2.7 MB) The level of detail provided by whole-genome sequencing could give hospita...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Featured Focus News November 2015 Source Type: research
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