Vital Signs: Illnesses on the Rise from Mosquito, Tick, and Flea Bites

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Infectious Diseases. 05/01/2018 This Web page provides information about bites from mosquitoes, ticks, and fleas, which can be vectors for spreading pathogens and vector-borne disease, like dengue, Zika, Lyme, or plague. It discusses what state and local public health agencies can do, and provides a video and sections about Overview, Problem, Infographic, What Can Be Done, and Issue Details. (Video or Multimedia)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: news

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Mosquito bites may be a nuisance, but fortunately, in the U.S., they tend to amount to nothing more than that. Upon being bitten, most Americans experience a bit of swelling and itchiness, and nothing more. However, there are exceptions to this, including stronger allergic reactions to bites and cases of mosquito-borne illness.  Insect and arachnid bites, including ticks, account for approximately 2,000 cases of malaria and 30,000 cases of Lyme disease in the U.S. annually. In addition, millions of people worldwide die of malaria each year. It is helpful to protect yourself against insect bites, not only to avoid pesk...
Source: Conversations with Dr Greene - Category: Child Development Authors: Tags: Dr. Greene's Blog Environmental Health Insect Bites & Stings Insects & Animals Outdoor Safety Source Type: blogs
Malaria, Zika virus, West Nile virus, Dengue fever, and Lyme disease are common causes of morbidity and mortality around the world. While arthropod bites may cause local inflammation and discomfort, a greater concern is the potential to develop deadly systemic infection. Prevention of systemic infections by use of insect repellent (IR) constitutes one of the most critical aspects of public health efforts. Cost-effectiveness, availability, and high-efficacy against arthropod vectors are the key characteristics of an ideal IR.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Discussion Dengue is an important arboviral infection that affects about 40% of the world population. It is found mainly in topical and subtropical areas of the world mainly in developing countries but it range is spreading including the United States. A review of common arboviruses can be found here. It is a flaviavirus with 4 distinct serotypes named DENV-1 through DENV-4 and is spread by A. aegypti a day biting mosquito. Infection with one serotype confers immunity to that serotype but not the others. It does offer some protection for cross-infection but this only lasts a few months. Incubation period is 3-14 days with ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Date: August 26, 2019 Issue #:  1579Summary:  Use of insect repellents is strongly recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to prevent infections transmitted by mosquitoes and ticks. Insect repellents applied to exposed skin should be used in conjunction with other preventive measures such as wearing pants and long-sleeved shirts, and avoiding outdoor activities during peak mosquito-biting times. Mosquitoes can transmit Zika, chikungunya, dengue, West Nile, eastern equine encephalitis, and yellow fever viruses, as well as...
Source: The Medical Letter - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Source Type: research
Malaria, Zika virus, West Nile virus, Dengue fever, and Lyme disease are common causes of morbidity and mortality around the world. While arthropod bites may cause local inflammation and discomfort, a greater concern is the potential to develop deadly systemic infection. The use of insect repellents (IR) to prevent systemic infections constitutes a fundamental public health effort. Cost-effectiveness, availability, and high-efficacy against arthropod vectors are key characteristics of an ideal IR.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Source Type: research
Parched olive groves in northern Croatia, where West Nile Virus has already claimed one victim this year. West Nile Virus infections have sharply increased in Europe this year, the World Health Organisation says, largely due to a longer transmission season in the region which this year saw high temperatures and extended rainy spells followed by dry weather, helping mosquito breeding and propagation. Credit: Ed Holt/IPSBy Ed HoltVIENNA, Sep 13 2018 (IPS)Climate change and health experts are warning of the growing threat to public health in Europe from global warming as rising temperatures help potentially lethal diseases sp...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Climate Change Development & Aid Editors' Choice Environment Europe Featured Headlines Health Population Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) Health and Environment Source Type: news
This article originally appeared on Health.com
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news
For most of us, springtime marks the return of life to a dreary landscape, bringing birdsong, trees in bud, and daffodils in bloom. But if you work for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the coming of spring means the return of nasty diseases spread by ticks and mosquitoes. The killjoys at CDC celebrated the end of winter with a bummer of a paper showing that infections spread by ticks doubled in the United States from 2004 to 2016. (Tick populations have exploded in recent decades, perhaps due to climate change and loss of biodiversity.) Lyme disease The most common infection spread by ticks in the US i...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Source Type: blogs
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 05/08/2018 This 27-minute teleconference focuses on new information about the nation's growing burden of disease from mosquitoes, ticks, and flea bites, and the important role that state and local departments and vector control organizations have in controlling them. These vector-borne diseases include dengue, Zika, West Nile, chikungunya, Lyme disease, and plague. Speakers also discuss the Minnesota Department of Health Vectorborne Diseases Unit, and Mosquito Control Program in New Orleans. (Video or Multimedia)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: news
The number of Americans infected by mosquito, tick, and flea bites tripled in the United States from  2004 to 2016, and a new study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the country is not prepared to deal with the continuing threat.  Mosquitos, ticks and fleas are "vectors" that can spread pathogens like dengue, Zika, Lyme disease or plague through their bite. The CDC reported more than 640,000 cases of these diseases in the period studied as well as the introduction or discovery…
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: news
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