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Center for AIDS Research funding renewed for an old and on-going fight

(University of California - San Diego) The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has awarded a five-year, $15 million grant to the San Diego Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) at UC San Diego, renewing support that extends back to an original establishing grant in 1994--the height of the AIDS epidemic.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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The only thing worse than getting the flu is catching it after you’ve gotten a flu shot. It’s been a terrible year for outbreaks — the worst in almost a decade. Contributing to that is the high failure rate of this year’s vaccine. The current shot is just 25 percent effective against the H3N2 virus, this season’s most-often-identified strain by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The experts say, with enough time and money, they can do a lot better. “There has to be a wholesale change to how we make the flu vaccine,” said Amesh Adalja, senior scholar at Johns Hopkins Ce...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Bloomberg flu healthytime onetime Source Type: news
The American Health Care Act (AHCA) and the Senate’s ill-fated Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA) attempted to deliver on two promises: 1) protecting patients with preexisting conditions, and 2) eliminating the Medicaid expansion. Though repeal efforts seem to have stalled for the time being, future GOP attempts to replace the ACA will undoubtedly involve the delicate task of appeasing conservative party members while maintaining provisions of the ACA that remain immensely popular with voters. While others have already discussed the failings of the proposed legislation with respect to the Medicaid expansion and pr...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Featured Following the ACA Medicaid and CHIP HIV/AIDS medicaid expansion states Source Type: blogs
(The City University of New York) Hunter College's Center for HIV/AIDS Educational Studies and Training (CHEST; @CHESTNYC) has been awarded a two-year milestone-based award (UG3-AI133674) for more than $2.9 million from the National Institute on Allergies and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) to address the sustained HIV epidemic among gay and bisexual men and other men who have sex with men (MSM). If agreed upon milestones for the first two years are achieved, an additional three years and more than $3.9 million have been committed.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Across China, the virus that could spark the next pandemic is already circulating. It’s a bird flu called H7N9, and true to its name, it mostly infects poultry. Lately, however, it’s started jumping from chickens to humans more readily–bad news, because the virus is a killer. During a recent spike, 88% of people infected got pneumonia, three-quarters ended up in intensive care with severe respiratory problems, and 41% died. What H7N9 can’t do–yet–is spread easily from person to person, but experts know that could change. The longer the virus spends in humans, the better the chance that i...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized CDC Disease ebola Gates Foundation MERS outbreak pandemic Zika Source Type: news
An arthropod-borne virus, Zika virus (ZIKV), has recently emerged as a major human pathogen. Associated with complications during perinatal development and Guillain-Barr é syndrome in adults, ZIKV raises new challenges for understanding the molecular determinants of flavivirus pathogenesis. This underscores the necessity for the development of a reverse genetic system based on an epidemic ZIKV strain. This technology relates to the generation and characterization in cell cultures of an infectious cDNA clone of ZIKV isolated from the 2015 epidemic in Brazil. The cDNA-derived ZIKV replicated efficiently in a variety o...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - Category: Research Authors: Source Type: research
WASHINGTON ― When Baltimore resident Arjun kisses his 6-year-old daughter’s forehead, it’s not always just a sign of affection. His daughter, Sujata, is onto him. “Is that a temperature kiss?” she asks. Arjun compulsively checks his little girl’s temperature for a reason. Sujata is the survivor of the “first well-described case” of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis in a young child in the U.S., according to her physicians. Tuberculosis is the world’s biggest killer among infectious diseases, and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis ― or XDR-TB, which is re...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 8 February 2017 Source:The Lancet HIV Author(s): Beatriz Grinsztejn, Emilia M Jalil, Laylla Monteiro, Luciane Velasque, Ronaldo I Moreira, Ana Cristina F Garcia, Cristiane V Castro, Alícia Krüger, Paula M Luz, Albert Y Liu, Willi McFarland, Susan Buchbinder, Valdilea G Veloso, Erin C Wilson Background The burden of HIV in transgender women (transwomen) in Brazil remains unknown. We aimed to estimate HIV prevalence among transwomen in Rio de Janeiro and to identify predictors of newly diagnosed HIV infections. Methods We recruited transwomen from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, by res...
Source: The Lancet HIV - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
The World Health Organization AIDS epidemic update estimates that more than 37 million people are living with HIV infection. Despite the unprecedented success of antiretroviral treatments, significant challenges remain in the fight against HIV. In particular, how uninfected cells capture HIV and transmit virions to target cells remains an unanswered question. Tissue mast cells and peripheral blood basophils can be exposed to virions or HIV products during infection. Several HIV proteins (i.e., envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41, Tat, and Nef) can interact with distinct surface receptors expressed by human basophils and ...
Source: International Archives of Allergy and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
The World Health Organization AIDS epidemic update estimates that more than 37 million people are living with HIV infection. Despite the unprecedented success of antiretroviral treatments, significant challenges remain in the fight against HIV. In particular, how uninfected cells capture HIV and transmit virions to target cells remains an unanswered question. Tissue mast cells and peripheral blood basophils can be exposed to virions or HIV products during infection. Several HIV proteins (i.e., envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41, Tat, and Nef) can interact with distinct surface receptors expressed by human basophils and ...
Source: International Archives of Allergy and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
More than 13,000 people are living with HIV in Washington, D.C. That’s 2 percent of the city’s population, or double the rate that constitutes an “epidemic” in the eyes of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nancy Mahon, global executive director of the MAC AIDS Fund, the philanthropic arm of the cosmetic company MAC, says it’s “shameful” that the infection rate is so high “in the backyard of our nation’s Capitol” ― especially given the United States’ leading role in funding international AIDS work. While D.C.’s infection rate has falle...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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