Respicardia launches Remed ē system, taps Sommerness as CEO

Respicardia said today it launched its Remedē transvenous implantable neurostimulation system designed to treat patients with central sleep apnea, and that it named Peter Sommerness as CEO. The Remedē system consists of a surgically placed battery pack and thin wires inserted into the blood vessels in the chest near the phrenic nerve, which it stimulates to engage the diaphragm to restore natural breathing during sleep and improve patient quality of life and satisfaction. “Central sleep apnea is very common in cardiac patients, especially patients with heart failure, and is associated with a significantly greater risk for morbidity and mortality. Being able to treat CSA offers a new hope to improve the quality of life for my patients,” Dr. William Abraham of the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center said in prepared remarks. The procedure treating the first patient was performed by Dr. Ralph Augostini at Columbus’ Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, the Minnetonka, Minn.-based company said. “The Remedē System is a breakthrough technology that uniquely treats central sleep apnea while greatly improving a patient’s quality of life. I am proud to be a part of the system’s first U.S. commercial case that has the potential to become the standard of care for these patients,” Dr. Augostini said in a prepared statement. Prior to joining Respicardia, Sommerness served as a partner at McKinsey and Comp...
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Business/Financial News Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation Respiratory Respicardia Source Type: news

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A 29-year-old female with a history of peripartum dilated cardiomyopathy with left ventricular ejection fraction 25%, hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea, and pulmonary hypertension was admitted to the hospital in acute decompensated heart failure and acute on chronic renal failure. She was initiated on dobutamine at 2.5  μg/kg/min intravenously and developed a regular narrow complex tachycardia at 210 beats per minute. This was determined to be an atrial tachycardia with 1:1 atrioventricular conduction.
Source: Journal of Electrocardiology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: research
Patients with heart failure and sleep apnea are at increased risk of developing arrhythmias. It is unknown whether treatment of sleep apnea reduces arrhythmias.
Source: Heart Rhythm - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: research
[Image from Exspiron]Children can be at risk for compromised breathing after surgery or from conditions like asthma, congestive heart failure or sleep apnea. Opioid therapy and sedation for medical procedures can also depress breathing. Unless a child is sick enough to have a breathing tube, respiratory problems can be difficult to detect early. Yet early detection can mean the difference between life and death. “There is currently no real-time objective measure,” says Viviane Nasr, MD, an anesthesiologist with Boston Children’s Hospital’s Division of Cardiac Anesthesia. “Instead, respiratory ...
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Blog Vector Blog Source Type: news
Respiratory polygraphy can accurately diagnose sleep apnea in patients hospitalized with heart failure
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Cardiology, Internal Medicine, Pulmonology, Geriatrics, Journal, Source Type: news
Condition:   Obstructive Sleep Apnea Intervention:   Other: CSR remote monitoring Sponsors:   Groupe Medical de Pneumologie, Polyclinique Saint-Laurent;   Slb Pharma;   Vitalaire;   Agence Régionale de Santé - Bretagne;   ResMed Enrolling by invitation
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Publication date: Available online 13 April 2018Source: PeptidesAuthor(s): Linghui Gong, Shenglin Zhang, Linrui Li, Xin Gao, Dongxia Wang, Dachang Wu, Ke Wang, Yan LiuAbstractSoluble (pro)renin receptor [s(P)RR], which is generated from cleavage of (P)RR, can be detected in plasma and urine. s(P)RR levels can reflect the severity of some diseases, such as renal lesions, gestational diabetes mellitus or hypertension, and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. However, the relationship between s(P)RR levels and the severity of chronic heart failure remains undetermined. We studied s(P)RR levels in 118 patients with chronic heart ...
Source: Peptides - Category: Biochemistry Source Type: research
Publication date: June 2018Source: Canadian Journal of Cardiology, Volume 34, Issue 6Author(s): Shoko Suda, Takatoshi Kasai, Hiroki Matsumoto, Nanako Shiroshita, Mitsue Kato, Fusae Kawana, Shoichiro Yatsu, Azusa Murata, Takao Kato, Masaru Hiki, Shuo-Ju Chiang, Sakiko Miyazaki, Hiroyuki DaidaAbstractBackgroundLimited data are available regarding the presence of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) assessed using polysomnography in patients hospitalized with left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction after acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). We investigated the prevalence and clinical correlates of SDB in patients hospital...
Source: Canadian Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 13 April 2018Source: PeptidesAuthor(s): Linghui Gong, Shenglin Zhang, Linrui Li, Xin Gao, Dongxia Wang, Dachang Wu, Ke Wang, Yan LiuAbstractSoluble (pro)renin receptor [s(P)RR], which is generated from cleavage of (P)RR, can be detected in plasma and urine. s(P)RR levels can reflect the severity of some diseases, such as renal lesions, gestational diabetes mellitus or hypertension, and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. However, the relationship between s(P)RR levels and the severity of chronic heart failure remains undetermined. We studied s(P)RR levels in 118 patients with chronic heart ...
Source: Peptides - Category: Biochemistry Source Type: research
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