MERS antibodies produced in cattle safe, treatment well tolerated in phase 1 trial

(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) An experimental treatment developed from cattle plasma for Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus infection shows broad potential, according to a small clinical trial led by National Institutes of Health scientists and their colleagues. The treatment, SAB-301, was safe and well tolerated by healthy volunteers, with only minor reactions documented.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes a highly lethal pulmonary infection with ~35% mortality. Currently there are no prophylactic measures or effective therapies. Inventors at the Vaccine Research Center of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases have identified and developed neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (nMAbs) against the MERS-CoV. This invention describes antibodies that target the Spike (S) glycoprotein on the coronavirus surface, which mediates viral entry into host cells. These novel antibodies target different regions of the S protein, and when administered in combin...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - Category: Research Authors: Source Type: research
Coronaviruses (CoVs) can cause severe respiratory disease with high fatality rates in humans. The 2002-2003 SARS-CoV epidemic resulted in 8098 cases and 744 deaths, and MERS-CoV, which emerged in 2012, has resulted in 2144 cases and over 750 deaths as of March 2018. Currently, there are no effective prophylactic or therapeutic measures, and because other CoVs are poised to emerge as new human pathogens, there is a need to define a general CoV vaccine solution. Past efforts to develop CoV vaccines have used whole-inactivated virus, live-attenuated virus, recombinant protein subunit, or genetic approaches.CoV spike (S) prote...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - Category: Research Authors: Source Type: research
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) New research published in Cell Reports from scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) shows how MERS-CoV can adapt to infect cells of a new species, which suggests that other coronaviruses might be able to do the same.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
CONCLUSION: Compounds V and VI were demonstrated viral inhibition towards Human cytomegalovirus, whereas cyclopropylquinoline derivative IV towards Rift Valley fever virus and Tacaribe virus. Additionally, cyclopropylquinoline derivative IV has displayed very good cytotoxicity against colon, breast and leukemia cell lines in vitro. PMID: 29792154 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Medicinal Chemistry - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Med Chem Source Type: research
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Enrollment has begun in an early-stage clinical trial testing the safety of two human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) designed to treat people infected with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). The trial is sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of NIH, and is funded in part by the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, part of the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, Department Health and Human Services.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) NIH scientists and colleagues report that an experimental vaccine given six weeks before exposure to Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) fully protects rhesus macaques from disease. The vaccine also generated potentially protective MERS-CoV antibodies in blood drawn from vaccinated camels. MERS-CoV, which causes pneumonia deep in the lungs, emerged in 2012 and has sickened more than 1,400 people and killed 500, mostly in the Middle East and Asia.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
Antibody against MERS Transmission EM of MERS-CoV. Image courtesy of National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is a severe infection of the lower respiratory tract caused by the MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV), which has been responsible for over 1,300 human infections and 500 deaths since...
Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences - Category: Science Tags: This Week in PNAS Source Type: research
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