Roche launches new quantitative antibody test to measure SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, to support the evaluation of vaccines
Basel, 18 September 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced the launch of its Elecsys ® Anti-SARS-CoV-2 S antibody test for markets accepting the CE Mark. Roche has filed for Emergency Use Authorisation (EUA) from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Elecsys Anti-SARS-CoV-2 serology test can be used to quantitatively measure antibodies in people who have been exposed to the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and can play an important part in characterising a vaccine-induced immune response.1 Specifically, the test targets antibodies which are directed against the ...
Source: Roche Media News - September 18, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Roche launches new quantitative antibody test to measure SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, to support the evaluation of vaccines
Basel, 18 September 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced the launch of its Elecsys ® Anti-SARS-CoV-2 S antibody test for markets accepting the CE Mark. Roche has filed for Emergency Use Authorisation (EUA) from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Elecsys Anti-SARS-CoV-2 serology test can be used to quantitatively measure antibodies in people who have been exposed to the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and can play an important part in characterising a vaccine-induced immune response.1 Specifically, the test targets antibodies which are directed against the ...
Source: Roche Investor Update - September 18, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Progress toward antiviral treatments for COVID-19
COVID-19 is caused by a virus known as SARS-CoV-2, which is similar in structure to two other viruses that have caused recent outbreaks: SARS-CoV, which caused an outbreak of SARS in 2003, and MERS-CoV, the cause of a 2012 outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - September 15, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Progress toward antiviral treatments for COVID-19
(American Institute of Physics) COVID-19 is caused by the virus SARS-CoV-2, which is structurally similar to the viruses that cause SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. In The Journal of Chemical Physics, scientists report molecular-level investigations of these viruses, providing a possible pathway to antiviral drugs to fight the diseases. They looked at a viral protein that plays a role in the virus's ability to replicate and in defeating the host's immune system, making it an attractive target for potential drug treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 15, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Cochrane Rapid Review examines travel-related control measures to contain the COVID-19 pandemic
 Can travel-related control measures contain the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic?What are travel-related control measures?To contain the spread of COVID-19, numerous countries have implemented control measures related to international travel. These include:complete closure of borders (i.e. a total ban on any border crossings);partial travel restrictions (e.g. restrictions on air travel only, or restrictions on travellers from certain countries);entry or exit screening (e.g. when travellers are asked about symptoms, examined physically, or tested for infection when leaving or entering a country);quarantine of traveller...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - September 10, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

The Great Vaccine Race: Inside the Unprecedented Scramble to Immunize the World Against COVID-19
The cleverest of enemies thrive on surprise attacks. Viruses—and coronaviruses in particular—know this well. Remaining hidden in animal hosts for decades, they mutate steadily, sometimes serendipitously morphing into more effective and efficient infectious agents. When a strain with just the right combination of genetic codes that spell trouble for people makes the leap from animal to human, the ambush begins. Such was the case with SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus behind COVID-19, and the attack was mostly silent and insidious at first. Many people infected with SARS-CoV-2 remained oblivious as they served as the v...
Source: TIME: Health - September 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Magazine Source Type: news

Roche receives FDA Emergency Use Authorization for the cobas SARS-CoV-2 & Influenza A/B Test for use on the cobas 6800/8800 Systems
Basel, 04 September 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced that the cobas ® SARS-CoV-2& Influenza A/B Test for use on the cobas ® 6800/8800 Systems has received Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This test is intended for the simultaneous qualitative detection and differentiation of SARS-CoV-2, Influenza A and Influenza B in patients suspected by their healthcare provider of having respiratory viral infection consistent with COVID-19. Additionally, it is available in markets accepting the CE mark.“With the approaching flu season, this new...
Source: Roche Media News - September 4, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Roche receives FDA Emergency Use Authorization for the cobas SARS-CoV-2 & Influenza A/B Test for use on the cobas 6800/8800 Systems
Basel, 04 September 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced that the cobas ® SARS-CoV-2& Influenza A/B Test for use on the cobas ® 6800/8800 Systems has received Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This test is intended for the simultaneous qualitative detection and differentiation of SARS-CoV-2, Influenza A and Influenza B in patients suspected by their healthcare provider of having respiratory viral infection consistent with COVID-19. Additionally, it is available in markets accepting the CE mark.“With the approaching flu season, this new...
Source: Roche Investor Update - September 4, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Plasmin could be the link between COVID-19 comorbidities and serious illness
(University of Alabama at Birmingham) Why is the COVID-19 virus more dangerous in people with comorbidities? Literature analysis shows that comorbidities like hypertension, diabetes, coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular illness, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and kidney dysfunction all feature elevated levels of the extracellular protease plasmin. Plasmin is able to nick proteins sequences called furin sites. For many viruses, this nicking increases viral infectivity, including SARS and MERS -- the two virulent coronaviruses that are related to the COVID-19 virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 2, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

High rates of delirium, persistent fatigue and post-traumatic stress disorder were common after severe infection in previous coronavirus outbreaks, NIHR
Little is known about the mental health consequences of severe COVID-19 illness because it is caused by a new coronavirus. Previous outbreaks caused by other coronaviruses (severe acute respiratory syndrome, SARS, and Middle East respiratory syndrome, MERS) may provide insights into ongoing problems after recovery from severe illness. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - August 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Convalescent Plasma Could Help Fight COVID-19
The last time most of us gave any thought to antibodies was probably in high school biology, but we’re getting a crash refresher course thanks to COVID-19. They are, after all, the key to our best defenses against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that’s caused the global pandemic. People who have been infected likely rely on antibodies to recover, and antibodies are what vaccines are designed to produce. Or at least that’s what infectious-disease and public-health experts assume for now. Because SARS-CoV-2 is such a new virus, even the world’s best authorities aren’t yet sure what it will take to build p...
Source: TIME: Health - August 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Leading in Time of COVID: A True Test of Leadership
By Folake OlayinkaAug 15 2020 (IPS) In 1918, the Spanish Flu, a deadly influenza caused by the H1N1 virus, decimated the world. Over the course of four successive waves, it infected 500 million people, about a third of the world’s population at the time, resulting in 50 million deaths. More recently between 2014 and mid-2016 , the Ebola virus epidemic was the most widespread outbreak of Ebola virus disease in history—causing devastating  loss of life and socioeconomic disruption in the West Africa region, mainly in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. These outbreaks, as well as SARS and MERS, each have ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - August 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Folake Olayinka Tags: Democracy Headlines Health Source Type: news

High rates of delirium, persistent fatigue and post-traumatic stress disorder were common after severe infection in previous coronavirus outbreaks, NIHR
Little is known about the mental health consequences of severe COVID-19 illness because it is caused by a new coronavirus. Previous outbreaks caused by other coronaviruses (severe acute respiratory syndrome, SARS, and Middle East respiratory syndrome, MERS) may provide insights into ongoing problems after recovery from severe illness. Researchers looked at reports of psychiatric problems during SARS and MERS outbreaks and compared this to early data from the COVID-19 pandemic. Delirium (sudden confusion) was common while patients were in hospital with any of the coronavirus infections (SARS, MERS or COVID-19). Later, once ...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - August 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Africa: The One Health Approach to Preventing the Next Pandemic
[AfricaFocus] Editor's Note: "COVID-19 is just one example of the rising trend of diseases - from Ebola to MERS to West Nile and Rift Valley fevers - caused by viruses that have jumped from animal hosts into the human population. ... The rising trend in zoonotic diseases is driven by the degradation of our natural environment - through land degradation, wildlife exploitation, resource extraction, climate change, and other stresses." - Press release from UN Environment Programme (UNEP) and International Livestock Re (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - August 3, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Broad antivirals kill SARS-CoV-2, the MERS virus, and other coronaviruses in cells and mice
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) A team of scientists has engineered antiviral compounds that can kill several types of coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 3, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Bill Gates on How the U.S. Can Course Correct Its COVID-19 Response: ‘You Wish Experts Were Taking Charge’
The U.S. domestic response to the COVID-19 pandemic thus far has been “weak,” Bill Gates believes. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation co-chair and Microsoft co-founder told TIME senior health correspondent Alice Park during a TIME100 Talks discussion on Thursday that he’d give the U.S.’s COVID-19 response, “on a relative and absolute basis, not a passing grade.” But, he added, the U.S.’s funding for vaccine and therapeutic research “has been the best in the world,” so if it coordinates to share resources globally, the U.S. could “potentially score the highest&...
Source: TIME: Health - July 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Madeleine Carlisle Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News Desk TIME100 Talks Source Type: news

Inside the Global Quest to Trace the Origins of COVID-19 —and Predict Where It Will Go Next
It wasn’t greed, or curiosity, that made Li Rusheng grab his shotgun and enter Shitou Cave. It was about survival. During Mao-era collectivization of the early 1970s, food was so scarce in the emerald valleys of southwestern China’s Yunnan province that farmers like Li could expect to eat meat only once a year–if they were lucky. So, craving protein, Li and his friends would sneak into the cave to hunt the creatures they could hear squeaking and fluttering inside: bats. Li would creep into the gloom and fire blindly at the vaulted ceiling, picking up any quarry that fell to the ground, while his companion...
Source: TIME: Health - July 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Campbell/ Yuxi, Yunnan and Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

Early COVID-19 Vaccine Results Look ‘Really Encouraging,’ Says NIH Boss Dr. Francis Collins
This article is part of #TIME100Talks: Finding Hope, a special series featuring leaders across different fields encouraging action toward a better world. Want more? Sign up for access to more virtual events, including live conversations with influential newsmakers. (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - July 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Chris Wilson Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 TIME100 Talks Source Type: news

Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) – Saudi Arabia
Between 1 April and 31 May 2020, the National IHR Focal Point of Saudi Arabia reported nine new cases of MERS-CoV infection, including five deaths. The cases were reported from Riyadh (seven cases), Assir (one case) and Northern (one case) Regions. Most cases were and ages of the reported cases ranged from 40 to 96 years. Of the cases reported in Riyadh six were from a hospital outbreak in the region between 21 and 31 May 2020: an index case who was a newly admitted patient, and five secondary cases identified through contact tracing. One of the secondary cases was a health care worker and the other four were in-patients a...
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - July 2, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: news Source Type: news

Covid-19 and the HIV connection revealed
(Natural News) Coronaviruses are pervasive throughout the human population and their symptoms typically manifest as the common cold. The four most popular coronaviruses identified include 229E (alpha coronavirus), NL63 (alpha coronavirus), OC43 (beta coronavirus), and HKU1 (beta coronavirus). More potent coronaviruses have emerged in recent years. MERS-CoV I is a beta coronavirus that causes Middle... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Up to 30% of Covid-19 survivors could be left with damaged and scarred lungs
Leaked NHS guidance says up to 30 per cent of Covid-19 survivors may suffer long-term lung damage, if it takes the same path as other coronaviruses such as SARS or MERS. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Study from Chinese city of Guangzhou provides key insights on how COVID-19 spreads in households
(The Lancet) New modelling research, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal, suggests the coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) that causes COVID-19 may spread more easily among people living together and family members than severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) or Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). The estimates are the first of their kind to quantify symptomless transmission. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The U.S. Government's Push For Coronavirus Vaccine 'Warp Speed' Faces Potential Black Hole Of Red Tape And Universe Of Unknowns
Dr. Stephen Thomas, who helped develop vaccine candidates for diseases such as Ebola, Zika and MERS, discusses the challenges involved in accelerating development during a pandemic. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - June 16, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Stephen Thomas, Contributor Tags: Healthcare /healthcare Innovation /innovation Science /science Business /business Policy /policy Editors' Pick editors-pick Decision Maker decision-maker Coronavirus Source Type: news

Pharmacologic Treatments and Supportive Care for MERS Pharmacologic Treatments and Supportive Care for MERS
What pharmacologic and supportive therapies are available for MERS and how effective are they?Emerging Infectious Diseases (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

MERS Fast Facts
Check out CNN's MERS Fast Facts to learn more about Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, a viral respiratory illness first identified in Saudi Arabia in 2012. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - June 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Coronavirus: Outbreak exercise showed ‘clear gap’ in readiness
A 2018 MERS outbreak exercise in Scotland revealed concerns over protective gear, the BBC learns. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - June 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Wearing Face Masks and Social Distancing Actually Work to Contain COVID-19, According to a New Study
The best practices for controlling an infectious disease like COVID-19 aren’t easy to follow—keeping six feet apart from others, wearing face masks in public, and, if you’re a health care worker, wearing shields to protect your eyes as well. But in a study published Monday in The Lancet, researchers provide the strongest evidence yet that these practices do indeed lower the risk of spreading the virus. An international group of scientists, led by senior author Dr. Holger Schunemann, professor of clinical epidemiology and medicine at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, analyzed 172 studies conducted in...
Source: TIME: Health - June 2, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Why Don't We Have a Vaccine for SARS or MERS? Why Don't We Have a Vaccine for SARS or MERS?
We don't have vaccines for SARS, MERS, or HIV. Does that spell doom for efforts to develop a vaccine for SARS-CoV-2?Medscape Internal Medicine (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - May 28, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Internal Medicine Commentary Source Type: news

Comparative pathogenesis of COVID-19, MERS, and SARS in a nonhuman primate model
The current pandemic coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome–coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), was recently identified in patients with an acute respiratory syndrome, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). To compare its pathogenesis with that of previously emerging coronaviruses, we inoculated cynomolgus macaques with SARS-CoV-2 or Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)–CoV and compared the pathology and virology with historical reports of SARS-CoV infections. In SARS-CoV-2–infected macaques, virus was excreted from nose and throat in the absence of clinical signs and detected in type I and II pneumocyte...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 28, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Rockx, B., Kuiken, T., Herfst, S., Bestebroer, T., Lamers, M. M., Oude Munnink, B. B., de Meulder, D., van Amerongen, G., van den Brand, J., Okba, N. M. A., Schipper, D., van Run, P., Leijten, L., Sikkema, R., Verschoor, E., Verstrepen, B., Bogers, W., La Tags: Medicine, Diseases, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

Liver Injury During Highly Pathogenic Coronavirus Infections Liver Injury During Highly Pathogenic Coronavirus Infections
Liver injury has been reported in cases of COVID-19 as well as in MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV. What do we know regarding the characteristics and mechanism of coronavirus infection-induced liver injury?Liver International (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - May 22, 2020 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Gastroenterology Journal Article Source Type: news

How Remdesivir Works to Fight COVID-19 Inside the Body
On May 1, the U.S Food and Drug Administration issued an emergency-use authorization of remdesivir, an experimental anti-viral drug. With this clearance, doctors in the U.S. are now allowed to use the drug to treat patients with severe cases of COVID-19. Remdesivir isn’t new. It was initially developed to treat Ebola and was also tested in the lab against SARS and MERS—two other coronaviruses that infect humans much like the virus that causes COVID-19. It never made it to the approval stage for those uses, but over the last four months, scientists desperate for options to help mitigate the coronavirus pandemic ...
Source: TIME: Science - May 21, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Emily Barone and Lon Tweeten Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

How Remdesivir Works to Fight COVID-19 Inside the Body
On May 1, the U.S Food and Drug Administration issued an emergency-use authorization of remdesivir, an experimental anti-viral drug. With this clearance, doctors in the U.S. are now allowed to use the drug to treat patients with severe cases of COVID-19. Remdesivir isn’t new. It was initially developed to treat Ebola and was also tested in the lab against SARS and MERS—two other coronaviruses that infect humans much like the virus that causes COVID-19. It never made it to the approval stage for those uses, but over the last four months, scientists desperate for options to help mitigate the coronavirus pandemic ...
Source: TIME: Health - May 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily Barone and Lon Tweeten Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

How Remdesivir Moved From Back Shelf to Best Hope for Treating COVID-19
This study showed that a five-day regimen is as effective as 10 days–that’s important, doctors say, since it could mean shorter stays in the hospital, which could alleviate some of the burden on the health care system. “Of course we will have to wait for the final review of all the data, but it would be very nice to have an anti-viral that’s efficacious in this terrible illness,” says Dr. Aruna Subramanian, a clinical professor of medicine at Stanford and an investigator on the study. “At least we know that we can help patients with this, and that’s really the bottom line.” T...
Source: TIME: Health - May 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

Checkmate! China ’s Coronavirus Connection
Conclusion In 1919 George A. Soper1 wrote that the deadly Spanish Flu pandemic that swept around the earth was without any precedents, and that there had been no such catastrophe ‘so sudden, so devastating and so universal’. He remarked that, “The most astonishing thing about the pandemic was the complete mystery which surrounded it. Nobody seemed to know what the disease was, where it came from or how to stop it. Anxious minds are inquiring today whether another wave of it will come again”. With close to 3 million positive cases and around 0.2 million deaths worldwide, the coronavirus has compelle...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - May 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Simi Mehta Tags: Asia-Pacific Civil Society Development & Aid Featured Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Posttraumatic stress disorder and depression of survivors 12  months after the outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome in South Korea - Park HY, Park WB, Lee SH, Kim JL, Lee JJ, Lee H, Shin HS.
BACKGROUND: The 2015 outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) in the Republic of Korea is a recent and representative occurrence of nationwide outbreaks of Emerging Infectious Diseases (EIDs). In addition to physical symptoms, posttraumatic stre... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Delirium and agitation may follow Covid-19 infection, study says
A study compares what we know about the long-term mental impact of past coronaviruses like MERS and SARS to today's novel coronavirus. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - May 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Lancet Psychiatry: Study finds few immediate mental health effects of COVID-19, but longer-term impact must be considered
(The Lancet) Most people admitted to hospital with severe COVID-19 should recover without experiencing mental illness if infection with SARS-CoV-2 follows a similar course to the coronavirus epidemics of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2002 and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) in 2012, according to the first systematic review and meta-analysis looking at the psychiatric consequences of coronavirus infections in over 3,550 patients hospitalised with SARS, MERS, and COVID-19, published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 18, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Covid-19 test results could mislead public | Letters
Dr Michael Browning is concerned by the limitations of the Roche antibody test, whileDennis Sherwoodis worried about the reliability of self-administered swabsPublic Health England ’s report on its validation of the Roche Covid-19 antibody test (which the government is promoting for widespread use) reveals a number of limitations that were not mentioned in the public briefings (Public Health England approves Roche test for coronavirus antibodies, 13 May). The test showed inadequate levels of sensitivity for detecting antibodies to Covid-19 until 40 days after the onset of symptoms, so will only be useful from six wee...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Medical research Science Health policy Imperial College London Biology Source Type: news

Coronavirus Treatment: Remdesivir Arrives At Some Mass. Hospitals In Limited Supply
BOSTON (CBS) – In the race to find a treatment for COVID-19, a drug that’s showing potential has reached some Massachusetts hospitals. It’s called remdesivir and it’s made by the California-based pharmaceutical company Gilead Sciences Inc. The FDA approved the drug for emergency use on May 1st. “Remdesivir is a broad spectrum antiviral agent, it targets viruses specifically,” said Vice Chair of Emergency Medicine at Massachusetts General, Dr. Ali Raja. “It was initially developed for viruses like SARS or MERS but it never got approved for those.” Last week, the federal gove...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated Local Anaridis Rodriguez Coronavirus remdesivir Source Type: news

Stronger and Safer Than Any Vaccine …
The coronavirus exposed the fatal flaw of our mainstream health system: the misguided dependence on the U.S. government and Big Pharma to save the day. Dozens of companies are now in a race to develop a coronavirus vaccine and treatment drugs — with billions of dollars in profits going to the winner. I have news for you: The vaccine won’t stop this virus. You can’t eradicate a virus like this with an external weapon like a vaccine, any more than you can eradicate seasonal flu or the common cold. But you can make sure you never get the coronavirus in the first place — or any other disease-causing...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - May 8, 2020 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Dr.A.Sears Tags: Health Source Type: news

KIST-CUK research team develops vaccine platform applicable to various viruses
(National Research Council of Science& Technology) MERS, which struck South Korea in a 2015 outbreak, was caused by a coronavirus--the same family of viruses that is responsible for COVID-19. Recently, a Korean research team announced that it had developed a new vaccine platform using RNA-based adjuvants for the MERS coronavirus. The research team successfully conducted an experiment on nonhuman primates. It is expected that the new vaccine platform will soon be applicable to the development of a COVID-19 vaccine, an urgent global health priority. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pediatric coronavirus disease (COVID-19) x-ray, CT in review of new lung disorders
(American Roentgen Ray Society) Although the clinical symptoms of SARS, H1N1, MERS, EVALI, and COVID-19 may be nonspecific, some characteristic imaging findings are emerging, says the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR). Careful evaluation of the distribution, lung zone preference, and symmetry of the abnormalities with an eye for a few unique differentiating imaging features can allow radiologists to offer a narrower differential diagnosis in pediatric patients, leading to optimal patient care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 8, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Hoping Llamas Will Become Coronavirus Heroes
Antibodies from Winter, a 4-year-old llama with great eyelashes, have neutralized coronavirus and other infections in lab experiments. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jillian Kramer Tags: Llamas Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Antibodies Research SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome) Cell (Journal) your-feed-science McLellan, Jason (Researcher) Saelens, Xavier Wrapp, Daniel (Researcher Source Type: news

The Baltimore Bioterrorism Expert Who Inspired South Korea ’s COVID-19 Response
On Oct. 2, 2001, a 62-year-old photojournalist named Bob Stevens became the first victim of a coordinated series of anthrax attacks to be admitted to hospital. Stevens inhaled the deadly pathogen after opening one of several letters laced with anthrax spores which were mailed to the offices of prominent senators and media outlets across the U.S. Over the next seven weeks, he and four others would die as a result of their exposure. For a shell-shocked nation still reeling from the single deadliest terrorist attack in human history on September 11, it was a disturbing realization that there was a new wave of challenges to Am...
Source: TIME: Health - May 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: David Cox Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Bat 'super immunity' may explain how bats carry coronaviruses -- USask study
(University of Saskatchewan) A University of Saskatchewan (USask) research team has uncovered how bats can carry the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus without getting sick -- research that could shed light on how coronaviruses make the jump to humans and other animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) – Saudi Arabia
From 1 through 31 March 2020, the National IHR Focal Point of Saudi Arabia reported 15 additional cases of MERS-CoV infection, including five associated deaths. The cases were reported from Riyadh (7 cases), Makkah (4 cases), Najran (3 cases), and Al Qassim (1 case) regions. The link below provides details of the 15 reported cases. (Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks)
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - May 5, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: news Source Type: news

This is what you should be demanding from your government to contain the virus | Devi Sridhar
Four months in, we know what works against coronavirus. These are eight important lessons from east AsiaDevi Sridhar is chair of global public health at the University of EdinburghCoronavirus – latest updatesKnowing how to control the spread of coronavirus is not rocket science. But actually doing it has proved elusive and difficult for many governments across the world. When China first alerted the World Health Organization about a novel coronavirus on31 December, the countdown began for countries to each prepare. Some, such as South Korea, Taiwan and Hong Kong, were scarred by their recent experiences with two othe...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 4, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Devi Sridhar Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Medical research Science World news Politics UK news Source Type: news

COMMENTARY: COVID-19: Don't Forget About Plasmapheresis
The strategy to filter out virions from infected plasma has been tested with the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus. Why not consider it for SARS-CoV2, asks nephrologist Tejas Desai. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - April 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Remdesivir Shows Promising Results as a Coronavirus Treatment, According to Drug Manufacturer Gilead
Gilead, a California-based biopharmaceutical company, released two encouraging reports about remdesivir, an experimental drug that is being tested as a COVID-19 treatment. In one statement, the company said that a large study of remdesivir “met its primary endpoint”: meaning, in this case, that the researchers have concluded that hospitalized patients taking the drug appear to improve faster than patients given a placebo. The study is run by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the U.S. National Institutes of Health and involves severe patients at multiple centers across th...
Source: TIME: Health - April 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

COVID-19: Don't Forget About Plasmapheresis COVID-19: Don't Forget About Plasmapheresis
The strategy to filter out virions from infected plasma has been tested with the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus. Why not consider it for SARS-CoV2, asks nephrologist Tejas Desai.Medscape Nephrology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - April 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nephrology Viewpoint Source Type: news