Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and the Modelling of Alzheimer's Disease: The Human Brain Outside the Dish.

Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and the Modelling of Alzheimer's Disease: The Human Brain Outside the Dish. Open Neurol J. 2017;11:27-38 Authors: Tong G, Izquierdo P, Raashid RA Abstract Background: Neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's Disease (AD) are a global health issue primarily in the elderly. Although AD has been investigated using primary cultures, animal models and post-mortem human brain tissues, there are currently no effective treatments. Summary: With the advent of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) reprogrammed from fully differentiated adult cells such as skin fibroblasts, newer opportunities have arisen to study the pathophysiology of many diseases in more depth. It is envisioned that iPSCs could be used as a powerful tool for neurodegenerative disease modelling and eventually be an unlimited source for cell replacement therapy. This paper provides an overview of; the contribution of iPSCs towards modeling and understanding AD pathogenesis, the novel human/mouse chimeric models in elucidating current AD pathogenesis hypotheses, the possible use of iPSCs in drug screening, and perspectives on possible future directions. Key messages: Human/mouse chimeric models using iPSCs to study AD offer much promise in better replicating AD pathology and can be further exploited to elucidate disease pathogenesis with regards to the neuroinflammation hypothesis of AD. PMID: 29151989 [PubMed]
Source: The Open Neurology Journal - Category: Neurology Tags: Open Neurol J Source Type: research

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The J.P. Morgan Healthcare conference runs every year in San Francisco, a big draw for the biotech industry, and many organizations take the opportunity to host events at the same time. Among these, the SENS Research Foundation has for the past few years hosted a pitch day in which biotech companies in the longevity industry, largely startups, present to that portion of the Bay Area investor community interested in funding the treatment of aging as a medical condition. I was there to present on progress at Repair Biotechnologies, and took some notes on the other companies as they talked about their work. Kimera Labs ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Investment Source Type: blogs
This study provides strong evidence that following a healthy lifestyle can substantially extend the years a person lives disease-free." Commentary on Recent Evidence for Cognitive Decline to Precede Amyloid Aggregation in Alzheimer's Disease https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/01/commentary-on-recent-evidence-for-cognitive-decline-to-precede-amyloid-aggregation-in-alzheimers-disease/ I can't say that I think the data presented in the research noted here merits quite the degree of the attention that it has been given in the popular science press. It is interesting, but not compelling if its role...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Condition:   Alzheimer Disease Intervention:   Drug: Hope Biosciences Autologous Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Sponsor:   Hope Biosciences Active, not recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
In this study, we investigated the link between AF and senescence markers through the assessment of protein expression in the tissue lysates of human appendages from patients in AF, including paroxysmal (PAF) or permanent AF (PmAF), and in sinus rhythm (SR). The major findings of the study indicated that the progression of AF is strongly related to the human atrial senescence burden as determined by p53 and p16 expression. The stepwise increase of senescence (p53, p16), prothrombotic (TF), and proremodeling (MMP-9) markers observed in the right atrial appendages of patients in SR, PAF, and PmAF points toward multiple inter...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, the present study revealed that NSC transplantation improved learning and memory functions in an AD mouse model. This treatment allowed repairing of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons and increased the expression of the cognition‑related proteins SYP, PSD‑95 and MAP‑2 in the hippocampus. PMID: 31922229 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Molecular Medicine Reports - Category: Molecular Biology Tags: Mol Med Rep Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 10 January 2020Source: Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and MedicineAuthor(s): Hossein Derakhshankhah, Soraya Sajadimajd, Samira Jafari, Zhila Izadi, Sajad Sarvari, Majid Sharifi, Mojtaba Falahati, Faezeh Moakedi, Willis Collins Akeyo Muganda, Mareike Müller, Mohammad Raoufi, John F. PresleyAbstractAlzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disease which leads to progressive dysfunction of cognition, memory and learning in elderly people. Common therapeutic agents are not only inadequate to suppress the progression of AD pathogenesis but also produce deleteri...
Source: Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine - Category: Nanotechnology Source Type: research
Abstract Aβ plaques of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are believed to precede cognitive deficits or clinical manifestation by decades. However, validated biomarkers for early diagnosis of the AD disease are still not available. In this present study, we combined MRI-based neuroimages and histological assessment of the glial response and altered cytokines, neurogenesis during the early course of Aβ deposits in TgAPP/PS1 mice to find potential early biomarkers for AD. We found that microglia and astrocytes were initially activated and clustered around Aβ plaques at the age of 6 months and significantly incr...
Source: Brain Research Bulletin - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Brain Res Bull Source Type: research
A rising level of TGF-β has long been associated with numerous aspects of aging. More modern research has shown it to encourage cells to become senescent. Further, TGF-β is an important component of the inflammatory mix of signals secreted by senescent cells, making it a part of the mechanism by which senescent cells can encourage their neighbors to also become senescent. When senescent cells fail to clear quickly, as happens in older individuals, this leads to a feedback loop of continually rising chronic inflammation and ever greater numbers of senescent cells. This is an important contribution to degenerative ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
by Prabesh Bhattarai, Mehmet Ilyas Cosacak, Violeta Mashkaryan, Sevgican Demir, Stanislava Dimitrova Popova, Nambirajan Govindarajan, Kerstin Brandt, Yixin Zhang, Weipang Chang, Konstantinos Ampatzis, Caghan Kizil It was recently suggested that supplying the brain with new neurons could counteract Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This provocative idea requires further testing in experimental models in which the molecular basis of disease-induced neuronal regeneration could be investigated. We previously found th at zebrafish stimulates neural stem cell (NSC) plasticity and neurogenesis in AD and could help to understand th...
Source: PLoS Biology: Archived Table of Contents - Category: Biology Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusion A great deal of progress is being made in the matter of treating aging: in advocacy, in funding, in the research and development. It can never be enough, and it can never be fast enough, given the enormous cost in suffering and lost lives. The longevity industry is really only just getting started in the grand scheme of things: it looks vast to those of us who followed the slow, halting progress in aging research that was the state of things a decade or two ago. But it is still tiny compared to the rest of the medical industry, and it remains the case that there is a great deal of work yet to be done at all...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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