Fitting in fitness for busy people

Today I led a small group of medical students on inpatient rounds. We had a patient on the seventh floor of the hospital. As I always do, I headed for the stairs, but told the students they could take the elevators if they wanted. (I promised them that they wouldn’t lose any points on their academic performance!) And as they usually do, they decided to join me in the stairwell. Yes, we huffed and puffed a bit, but we still chatted, discussing fitness the whole time. I take the stairs for many reasons, not the least of which is a frightening malfunctioning elevator experience from several years ago (a long story involving a team of maintenance personnel and a crowbar). But a bigger factor is my own vigorous, unapologetic self-care regimen. I know I need regular exercise to maintain my mood and my health, so I fit it in wherever I can. If I have a patient on the seventh floor — or even the 22nd floor — I look at it as a terrific opportunity for a mini-workout in the middle of my workday. We know it’s good for us, so why don’t we do it more? The proven benefits of exercise are endless. Most people already know that mountains of research show that regular physical activity improves every aspect of our health: it decreases cardiovascular risk, manages stress, improves mood, delays dementia, eases chronic pain, and on and on. Some people are committed to fitness and get more than enough exercise. But, most are not. One of the biggest barriers to regula...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Exercise and Fitness Health Source Type: blogs

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CONCLUSION: On the basis of a broadly based research and participatory development process, a set of indicators has been developed that enables comprehensive evaluation of the regional quality of care of cross-indication, integrated care models focusing on common diseases. In order to be able to increasingly evaluate aspects of care coordination and patient orientation, health promotion as well as nursing, palliative and emergency care in the future, it would be helpful if routine data were collected or made accessible in these areas as well. PMID: 32467041 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Zeitschrift fur Evidenz, Fortbildung und Qualitat im Gesundheitswesen - Category: Health Management Tags: Z Evid Fortbild Qual Gesundhwes Source Type: research
Cognition is an important function of the brain that enables us to acquire and process information, to enhance our understanding of thoughts, experiences, and our senses. Any condition that affects our ability to think, reason, memorize, or be attentive affects our cognitive ability. Some cognitive decline is a normal part of aging, but there are many things you can do to prevent or forestall cognitive changes as you age, including when planning for surgery. Older adults are having more surgical procedures As our population ages and medicine and healthcare advances, more older adults are likely to develop serious condition...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Healthy Aging Managing your health care Memory Neurological conditions Prevention Surgery Source Type: blogs
This article discusses how neurological know-how could be integrated in academic geriatric medicine to improve care of neurogeriatric patients, to foster neurogeriatric research and training concepts and to provide innovative care concepts for geriatric patients with predominant neurological conditions and disabilities. PMID: 32430766 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Zeitschrift fur Gerontologie und Geriatrie - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Z Gerontol Geriatr Source Type: research
This study aimed to translate and evaluate the psychometric properties of Doloplus-2 in the elderly with dementia in Iran. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this methodological study, after translation and evaluating the face and content validity of Doloplus-2, 100 elderly people were selected by the convenience sampling method in Kashan, 2018-19. Exploratory factor analysis, convergent validity, and known-groups comparison were applied to determine construct validity. Reliability was also assessed through internal consistency, equivalence, and stability methods were used. The ceiling and floor effects were also examined. Data...
Source: Turkish Journal of Medical Sciences - Category: General Medicine Tags: Turk J Med Sci Source Type: research
Photo credit Neonbrand Dear Carol: Both of my parents were ill for years. Mom, who died two years ago, fought several types of cancer and then developed dementia. Dad, who died three months ago, had a massive stroke right after Mom’s death and his last years were full of physical and emotional pain. My brother and I grieve our parents, but we saw them wear out from health struggles and feel that they are now together in a better place, so there’s quite of bit of relief, as well. Knowing our parents are no longer suffering is part of the relief, but I’m also relieved that I can now spend more time with my ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, our study demonstrated that Nrf2 deficiency promoted the increasing trend of autophagy during aging in skeletal muscle. Nrf2 deficiency and increasing age may cause excessive autophagy in skeletal muscle, which can be a potential mechanism for the development of sarcopenia. To What Degree is Chondrocyte Hypertrophy in Osteoarthritis Due to Cellular Senescence? https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/04/to-what-degree-is-chondrocyte-hypertrophy-in-osteoarthritis-due-to-cellular-senescence/ Senescent cells are large. They do not replicate, that function is disabled, but it is as if they go ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Jeiri Flores is normally a busy, upbeat 29-year-old. But amid the COVID-19 pandemic, her go-to thought has been dark. “If I get this,” she thinks, “I’m gonna die.” This is not an unfounded fear. Flores has cerebral palsy, uses a wheelchair and needs assistance with everyday tasks, including making food and getting dressed. Her disability means it’s tougher for her immune system to kick illnesses; she’s still recovering from a bout of pneumonia she had in January. So beating COVID-19 could easily mean a protracted battle and months in a hospital—a prospect that comes with a c...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
This article provides an overview of the evidence on the risks and benefits of using medical cannabis for the indications of chronic pain, cancer-related pain, cancer cachexia, dementia, and Alzheimer's disease. Currently, there is insufficient evidence to determine the effectiveness and safety of cannabinoids for most reviewed indications, with the exception of chronic pain. Future research is required before palliative care clinicians can make evidence-based decisions on the integration of medical cannabis as adjunct therapies. PMID: 32312410 [PubMed - in process]
Source: The Medical Clinics of North America - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Med Clin North Am Source Type: research
This article provides an overview of the evidence on the risks and benefits of using medical cannabis for the indications of chronic pain, cancer-related pain, cancer cachexia, dementia, and Alzheimer ’s disease. Currently, there is insufficient evidence to determine the effectiveness and safety of cannabinoids for most reviewed indications, with the exception of chronic pain. Future research is required before palliative care clinicians can make evidence-based decisions on the integration of m edical cannabis as adjunct therapies.
Source: Medical Clinics of North America - Category: Primary Care Authors: Source Type: research
Do you have difficult — or even toxic — family members? How does one go about setting boundaries with them? And is it OK to cut them off? In today’s Not Crazy podcast, Jackie and Gabe tackle these tough questions with Sonya Mastick, a mental health advocate and fellow podcaster of a show called “What Won’t She Say?” Sonya shares her personal story of how she handled her toxic mom and demonstrates how it’s OK, and sometimes even necessary, to set strong boundaries with family members who hurt you. It’s also OK if those boundaries shift and evolve with time. Tune in for an hon...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Family General Interview LifeHelper Mental Health and Wellness Not Crazy Podcast Source Type: blogs
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