Suicide molecules kill any cancer cell

(Northwestern University) A super assassin hidden in every cell forces the cell to commit suicide if it becomes cancerous, reports a new study, the first to identify molecules to trigger a fail-safe mechanism that may protect us from cancer. The mechanism -- RNA suicide molecules -- can potentially be developed into a novel form of cancer therapy. Cancer cells treated with the RNA molecules never become resistant to them because they simultaneously eliminate multiple genes that cancer cells need for survival.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

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Conclusions sections. Both authors shared in the final refinement of the manuscript. Funding Salary support for WG by National Science Foundation grant 1624615 is gratefully acknowledged. Conflict of Interest Statement The authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest. Acknowledgments We gratefully acknowledge very useful comments from Peter Klein on an earlier version of this manuscript, and from the reviewers of this paper, whose comments have resulted in improvements. An earlier version of this...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Xuequn Xu†, J. N. Rashida Gnanaprakasam†, John Sherman† and Ruoning Wang* Center for Childhood Cancer and Blood Diseases, Hematology/Oncology &BMT, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States The adoptive transfer of T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) through genetic engineering is one of the most promising new therapies for treating cancer patients. A robust CAR T cell-mediated anti-tumor response requires the coordination of nutrient and energy supplies with CAR T cell expansion and function. Howe...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
In conclusion, osmotic burst of inflated complement-damaged cells may occur, but these bursts are most likely a consequence of metabolic collapse of the cell rather than the cause of cell death. The Complement Cell Death Mediator: A Concerted Action of Toxic Moieties Membrane pores caused by complement were first visualized by electron microscopy on red blood cell membranes as large ring structures (22). Similar lesions were viewed on E. coli cell walls (23). Over the years, ample information on the fine ultrastructure of the MAC that can activate cell death has been gathered (24) and has been recently further examined (...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Authors: Eckel HE, Bradley PJ Abstract Recent advances in minimal access surgery have shown promise in the treatment of limited hypopharyngeal lesions. In spite of their functionally excellent results in individual patients, it currently remains unlikely that these approaches will gain a more major universal impact on hypopharyngeal cancer care. In advanced stage hypopharyngeal cancer, the use of the traditional radical surgery, such as laryngo-pharyngectomy, is no longer accepted by many patients. In recent years, most would rather opt for less mutilating treatment, preferring a non-surgical option. Patients, fami...
Source: Advances in Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Category: ENT & OMF Tags: Adv Otorhinolaryngol Source Type: research
Human Gene Therapy,Volume 30, Issue 4, Page 413-428, April 2019.
Source: Human Gene Therapy - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
The cytosine deaminase (CD)/5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) system is among the best explored enzyme/prodrug systems in the field of the suicide gene therapy. Recently, by the screening of the environmental metagenomi...
Source: BMC Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
In this study, we show that calorie restriction is protective against age-related increases in senescence and microglia activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in an animal model of aging. Further, these protective effects mitigated age-related decline in neuroblast and neuronal production, and enhanced olfactory memory performance, a behavioral index of neurogenesis in the SVZ. Our results support the concept that calorie restriction might be an effective anti-aging intervention in the context of healthy brain aging. Greater Modest Activity in Late Life Correlates with Lower Incidence of Dementia ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Immortalization of plasma cells leads to Multiple Myeloma (MM). Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule F7 (SLAMF7) is highly expressed on the malignant plasma cells that constitute Multiple Myeloma. The expression of SLAMF7 by MM cells and lack of expression on nonhematologic cells makes SLAMF7 a promising target for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies for the treatment of MM.  In addition to expression on normal and malignant plasma cells, SLAMF7 is also known to be expressed on a variety of other leukocytes including most natural killer (NK) cells, some CD8+ T cells, a small fraction of CD4+ T cells, ...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - Category: Research Authors: Source Type: research
(Lomonosov Moscow State University) A team from the Faculty of Medicine, MSU has analysed a link between the p53 protein, tumor dissemination and 'cell suicide' and discussed possible approaches to predict metastases development and their treatment. They also discussed new chemical compounds that might influence the process of metastasis. The study was supported by a grant from Russian Science Foundation (RSF). The results were published in the Cancers journal.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
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