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Does genetic testing for ER α gene polymorphisms provide new possibilities of treatment for cognitive function disorders in postmenopausal women?

Does genetic testing for ERα gene polymorphisms provide new possibilities of treatment for cognitive function disorders in postmenopausal women? Arch Med Sci. 2017 Aug;13(5):1224-1232 Authors: Gujski M, Pinkas J, Wierzbińska-Stępniak A, Owoc A, Bojar I Abstract It is commonly considered that cognitive abilities decrease with age, especially with respect to processing and psychomotor speed. It is an interesting issue whether, apart from the ageing process, the undergoing of menopause itself deteriorates cognitive functions, compared to women at reproductive age. Hopes for improvement of cognitive functions were pinned on the use of menopausal hormone therapy. However, the results of studies concerning the effect of hormone replacement therapy on cognition proved to be contradictory. It seems that the essence of the problem is more complicated than only estrogen deficiency. It is suggested that estrogen receptor α (ERα) polymorphism may be responsible for the differences in the effect of estrogens on cognitive processes. The article presents current knowledge concerning the effect of estrogens on the central nervous system, especially the role of ERα polymorphism, with respect to foreseeing benefits from the use of exogenous estrogens for cognitive functions. At the present stage of research, ERα appears to be poorly specific; nevertheless, it may be an important instrument for the classification of peri- and post-menopausal ...
Source: Archives of Medical Science - Category: General Medicine Tags: Arch Med Sci Source Type: research

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Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Authors: Bojar I, Pinkas J, Gujski M, Owoc A, Raczkiewicz D, Gustaw-Rothenberg K Abstract INTRODUCTION: The focus of this study was to assess cognitive functions in relation to androgens and specifically testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone in postmenopausal women as well as the correlation between cognitive functions and these two androgens according to polymorphism of the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE). MATERIAL AND METHODS: A group of 402 women was recruited to the study (minimum 2 years after the last menstruation, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) more than 30 U/ml and no dementia signs on Montreal Cogni...
Source: Archives of Medical Science - Category: General Medicine Tags: Arch Med Sci Source Type: research
Abstract Several lines of investigation have shown a protective role for estrogen in Alzheimer's disease through a number of biological actions. This review examines studies of the role of estrogen-related factors in age at onset and risk for Alzheimer's disease in women with Down syndrome, a population at high risk for early onset of dementia. The studies are consistent in showing that early age at menopause and that low levels of endogenous bioavailable estradiol in postmenopausal women with Down syndrome are associated with earlier age at onset and overall risk for dementia. Polymorphisms in genes associated wi...
Source: Free Radical Biology and Medicine - Category: Biology Authors: Tags: Free Radic Biol Med Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: Front Neuroendocrinol Source Type: research
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