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3D-printed organ dev BioLife4D registers for $50m IPO

Biological 3D printing developer BioLife4D has filed for a $50 million initial public offering as it looks to commercialize its cardiac tissue regeneration and organ replacement processes. The Chicago-based company said yesterday it is developing technologies with an end goal of creating a 3D bioprinted viable human heart suitable for transplant. Funds from the offering are slated to support working capital and fund initiatives which include expanding personnel, acquiring additional laboratory space and licensing related technologies. “Heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide – killing one in four men and one in three women while outpacing all forms of cancer combined. BioLife4D is committed to transforming the treatment of heart disease, capitalizing on recent medical breakthroughs and optimizing a process that will ultimately give patients the gift of time. BioLife4D is bringing revolutionary life-saving care to the masses, and we want the masses to have a chance to be a part of this revolution. Equity crowdfunding can help us accomplish this important objective, and we’re extremely excited for interested investors to join us,” BioLife4D CEO Steven Morris said in a press release. BioLife4D said its primary focus will be making viable organ replacement a “safe, accessible and affordable reality.” (Learn from top medical device industry 3D printing experts at DeviceTalks Boston on Oct. 2.) The post 3D-printed organ dev BioLife4...
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Business/Financial News Regenerative Medicine Research & Development biolife4d Source Type: news

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This study developed the first procedure for the removal of epithelium from the lung airway with the full preservation of vascular epithelium, which could be applied in vivo to treat diseases of lung epithelium. Whole lung scaffolds with an intact vascular network may also allow for recellularization using patient-specific cells and bioengineering of chimeric lungs for transplantation. In addition to the clinical potential, lung scaffolds lacking an intact epithelial layer but with functional vascular and interstitial compartments may also serve as a valuable physiological model for investigating (i) lung development, (ii)...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study didn't measure whether receiving the cardiosphere-derived cells extended lifespans, so we have a lot more work to do. We have much to study, including whether CDCs need to come from a young donor to have the same rejuvenating effects and whether the extracellular vesicles are able to reproduce all the rejuvenating effects we detect with CDCs." Cardiac and systemic rejuvenation after cardiosphere-derived cell therapy in senescent rats Cardiosphere-derived cell (CDC) therapy has exhibited several favourable effects on heart structure and function in humans and in preclinical models; however,...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: Alterations to RV structure may represent a mechanism by which long-term PM10–2.5 exposure increases risks for adverse respiratory and cardiovascular outcomes, especially among certain susceptible populations. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP658 Received: 14 June 2016 Revised: 24 February 2017 Accepted: 16 March 2017 Published: 27 July 2017 Address correspondence to S. D. Adar, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, SPH II-5539, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA. Telephone: (734) 615-9207; Email: sadar@umich.edu Supplemental Material is available online (https://doi.org/10.1289/E...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by the author. Data Availability All national (MagIran, Science Information Database (SID) and Iranmedex) and international (PubMed, Scopus) databases were searched from November 2010 to November 2016 using keywords both in English and Persian: Afghan immigrants, Afghan refugees, Iran, infectious diseases, tuberculosis, HIV, Hepatitis B and C, non-communicable disease, food security, mental health, barriers, health insurance, access to health service. All related websites and webpages were also searched by Google with the same keywords ...
Source: PLOS Currents Disasters - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: research
This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by the author. Data Availability All national (MagIran, Science Information Database (SID) and Iranmedex) and international (PubMed, Scopus) databases were searched from November 2010 to November 2016 using keywords both in English and Persian: Afghan immigrants, Afghan refugees, Iran, infectious diseases, tuberculosis, HIV, Hepatitis B and C, non-communicable disease, food security, mental health, barriers, health insurance, access to health service. All related websites and webpages were also searched by Google with the same keywords ...
Source: PLOS Currents Disasters - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusions: Saliva contains molecular information worthy of interrogation via EWAS. The simplicity of specimen collection suggests that saliva offers a practical alternative to blood for measurements that can be used to characterize individual exposomes. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1011 Received: 23 August 2016 Revised: 08 November 2016 Accepted: 18 November 2016 Published: 20 July 2017 Address correspondence to V. Bessonneau, Silent Spring Institute, 320 Nevada St., Suite 302, Newton, Massachusetts 02460 USA. Telephone: (617) 332-4288. Email: vincent.bessonneau@gmail.com The authors declare they have no actual or po...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
This study aimed to estimate associations between combined measurements of BMI and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) with mortality and incident coronary artery disease (CAD). This study followed 130,473 UK Biobank participants aged 60-69 years (baseline 2006-2010) for 8.3 years (n = 2974 deaths). Current smokers and individuals with recent or disease-associated (e.g., from dementia, heart failure, or cancer) weight loss were excluded, yielding a "healthier agers" group. Ignoring WHR, the risk of mortality for overweight subjects was similar to that for normal-weight subjects. However, among normal-weight subjects...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This article covers some of the advances of recent years in understanding the effects of varied forms of calorie restriction in humans. Efforts to quantify the results and find a good 80/20 point, at which most of the effects of longer and more stringent reductions in calorie intake are still evident, have resulted in practical outcomes. A number of quite interesting discoveries have been made along the way, such as the ability of longer fasting periods to clear out and replace damaged immune cells to some degree. The second phase of the Comprehensive Assessment of Long-term Effects of Reducing Intake of Energy (C...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, the analyses do not permit us to predict the trajectory that maximum lifespans will follow in the future, and hence provide no support for their central claim that the maximum lifespan of humans is "fixed and subject to natural constraints". This is largely a product of the limited data available for analysis, owing to the challenges inherent in collecting and verifying the lifespans of extremely long-lived individuals. A reply from Jan Vijg's research group The authors of the accompanying comment disagree with our finding of a limit to human lifespan. Although we thank them for a...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study is the first to show that downregulation of PAPP-A expression in adult mice can significantly extend life span. Importantly, this beneficial longevity phenotype is distinct from the dwarfism of long-lived PAPP-A KO, Ames dwarf, Snell dwarf and growth hormone receptor (GHR) KO mice with germ-line mutations. Thus, downregulation of PAPP-A expression joins other treatment regimens, such as resveratrol, rapamycin and dietary restriction, which can extend life span when started in mice as adults. In a recent study, inducible knockdown of the GHR in young adult female mice increased maximal, but not median, lif...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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