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Google ’ s Verily is developing AI-powered heart disease test using retinal images

Google (NSDQ:GOOG) parent Alphabet‘s (NSDQ:GOOGL) Verily is developing a new artificial-intelligence powered test that searches for indicators of heart disease risk present in retina images, according to a new study. The study, which has not yet been peer reviewed but has been published by Cornell University, details a new machine-learning powered system designed by Verily to “discover new knowledge from retinal fundus images.” The system operates on data from 284,335 patients, validated on 2 independent datasets of 12,026 and 999 patients, to predict cardiovascular risks “not previously thought to be present or quantifiable in retinal images,” according to the study publication. Researchers claim they were able to use the system to determine a patient’s age accurate to within 3.3 years, gender, smoking status, HbA1c levels, systolic blood pressure and major adverse cardiac events from retinal images. The AI-powered system uses “distinct aspects of the anatomy to generate each prediction,” according to the study, which researchers claim could open up avenues of further research into the technique. Study investigators touted that the system was comparable to the European SCORE risk calculator, but offered the caveat that study came with several limitations, including a “relatively small” dataset size for deep learning. “In particular, although the AUC for cardiovascular events was comparable to SCORE, ...
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Cardiovascular Imaging Optical/Ophthalmic Research & Development Alphabet Inc. Google Inc. Verily Source Type: news

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Conclusion: ECMO is only needed in a small proportion of postoperative ACHD patients. The use of ECMO significantly increases cost, length of stay and mortality in these patients. Improved identification of postoperative ACHD patients who are more likely to survive ECMO may facilitate improved survival and decreased resource utilization.
Source: Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine - Category: Intensive Care Authors: Source Type: research
This study developed the first procedure for the removal of epithelium from the lung airway with the full preservation of vascular epithelium, which could be applied in vivo to treat diseases of lung epithelium. Whole lung scaffolds with an intact vascular network may also allow for recellularization using patient-specific cells and bioengineering of chimeric lungs for transplantation. In addition to the clinical potential, lung scaffolds lacking an intact epithelial layer but with functional vascular and interstitial compartments may also serve as a valuable physiological model for investigating (i) lung development, (ii)...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Biological 3D printing developer BioLife4D has filed for a $50 million initial public offering as it looks to commercialize its cardiac tissue regeneration and organ replacement processes. The Chicago-based company said yesterday it is developing technologies with an end goal of creating a 3D bioprinted viable human heart suitable for transplant. Funds from the offering are slated to support working capital and fund initiatives which include expanding personnel, acquiring additional laboratory space and licensing related technologies. “Heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide – killing one in four ...
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Business/Financial News Regenerative Medicine Research & Development biolife4d Source Type: news
Genetically engineered loss of ANGPTL2 has been shown to slow the progression of heart disease in mice. Lower levels of ANGPTL2 result from exercise, and higher levels are associated with greater age, greater amounts of visceral fat, and the presence of senescent cells, among other factors - all of which fits well with the range of known risk factors for heart disease. The more ANGPTL2 in circulation, the worse the outcome. This open access review paper covers what is presently known of ANGPTL2 and its role in metabolism and age-related cardiovascular disease: of interest given the past few years of research is that ANGPTL...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
Abstract As VAD have become an effective therapy for endā€stage heart failure, their application in congenital heart disease has increased. Single ventricle congenital heart disease introduces unique physiologic challenges for VAD use. However, with regard to the mixed clinical results presented within this review, we suggest that patient selection, timing of implant, and center experience are all important contributors to outcome. This review focuses on the published experience of VAD use in single ventricle patients and details physiologic challenges and novel approaches in this growing pediatric and adult population.
Source: Pediatric Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: REVIEW ARTICLE Source Type: research
This study reviews the North American experience with Berlin Heart EXCOR® ventricular assist device implants in children with such physiology. The Berlin Heart clinical database was reviewed. Patients with primary diastolic dysfunction are included in this study. Twenty pediatric patients with restrictive cardiomyopathy (n = 13), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (n = 3), or congenital heart disease with restrictive physiology (n = 4) who were supported with EXCOR® were identified. Of these, nine (45%) were successfully bridged to transplant, one (5%) weaned from support, and 10 (50%) died a...
Source: Pediatric Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
Background— Transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement (TPVR) is an established therapy for dysfunctional right ventricular (RV) outflow tract conduits. TPVR in patients with congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, subpulmonary left ventricle, and left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) conduit dysfunction has not been studied. Unique anatomic and physiological aspects of this population may contribute to distinct risks and outcomes. Methods and Results— Across 10 US centers, 27 patients with a dysfunctional LVOT conduit were evaluated in the catheterization laboratory between December 2008 an...
Source: Circulation: Cardiovascular Interventions - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Catheter-Based Coronary and Valvular Interventions, Stent Congenital Heart Disease Source Type: research
For many decades, cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and exercise training (ET;CRET) programs have been indicated in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) following major CHD events and revascularization procedures,1,2 but this therapy is greatly under-utilized.3 More recently, this therapy has become indicated for patients with chronic systolic heart failure (HF).4 Although especially in CHD, there may be benefits of other components of CR, by far the main component is the ET with improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), which likely explains most of the benefits of CR in CHD and HF.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractEvidence suggests that outcomes in pediatric cardiac surgery are improved by consolidating care into centers of excellence. Our objective was to determine if outcomes are equivalent in patients across a large regional referral base, or if patients from centers without on-site surgery are at a disadvantage. Since 1996, all pediatric cardiac surgery has been offered at one of two centers within the region assessed, with the majority being performed at Stollery Children ’s Hospital. All patients who underwent a Fontan between 1996 and 2016 were included. Follow-up data including length of stay (LOS), repeat surg...
Source: Mammalian Genome - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
This study didn't measure whether receiving the cardiosphere-derived cells extended lifespans, so we have a lot more work to do. We have much to study, including whether CDCs need to come from a young donor to have the same rejuvenating effects and whether the extracellular vesicles are able to reproduce all the rejuvenating effects we detect with CDCs." Cardiac and systemic rejuvenation after cardiosphere-derived cell therapy in senescent rats Cardiosphere-derived cell (CDC) therapy has exhibited several favourable effects on heart structure and function in humans and in preclinical models; however,...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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