Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

Google ’ s Verily is developing AI-powered heart disease test using retinal images

Google (NSDQ:GOOG) parent Alphabet‘s (NSDQ:GOOGL) Verily is developing a new artificial-intelligence powered test that searches for indicators of heart disease risk present in retina images, according to a new study. The study, which has not yet been peer reviewed but has been published by Cornell University, details a new machine-learning powered system designed by Verily to “discover new knowledge from retinal fundus images.” The system operates on data from 284,335 patients, validated on 2 independent datasets of 12,026 and 999 patients, to predict cardiovascular risks “not previously thought to be present or quantifiable in retinal images,” according to the study publication. Researchers claim they were able to use the system to determine a patient’s age accurate to within 3.3 years, gender, smoking status, HbA1c levels, systolic blood pressure and major adverse cardiac events from retinal images. The AI-powered system uses “distinct aspects of the anatomy to generate each prediction,” according to the study, which researchers claim could open up avenues of further research into the technique. Study investigators touted that the system was comparable to the European SCORE risk calculator, but offered the caveat that study came with several limitations, including a “relatively small” dataset size for deep learning. “In particular, although the AUC for cardiovascular events was comparable to SCORE, ...
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Cardiovascular Imaging Optical/Ophthalmic Research & Development Alphabet Inc. Google Inc. Verily Source Type: news

Related Links:

Google researchers predicted cardiovascular risk factors not previously thought to be quantifiable in retinal images using artificial intelligence, according to a study published in Nature Biomedical Engineering. Scientists were able to identify risk factors such as age, gender, smoking status, blood pressure and major adverse cardiac events by only looking at the eye. Cardiovascular diseases are lethal and widespread According to the WHO, an estimated 17 million people die of cardiovascular diseases, particularly heart attacks and strokes, every year. Looking only at the statistics of heart diseases, one in every fourth d...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine A.I. AI cardiovascular digital health eye future google Innovation Source Type: blogs
Google has developed an artificial intelligence algorithm that can assess someone's risk for heart disease by looking at their retinas.
Source: Health News - UPI.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
BOSTON (CBS) — A Boston woman is waiting for a new heart this Valentine’s Day. But while her heart may be broken, she is living as though it is full. Cindy Washington was 19 and a freshman at Northeastern University pursuing a pre-law degree when she became overwhelmingly tired. “I started to lose my breath and to sweat a lot,” Cindy recalls. After many trips to the ER, doctors finally figured out her heart was enlarged, weak and failing. In fact, Cindy’s heart was so sick she went into cardiac arrest twice, both times revived by her mom. “She had to bring me to the floor and pump and re...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Healthwatch Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Heart Transplant Valentine's Day Source Type: news
This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Source: American Journal of Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Conclusions CHF, acute/chronic kidney injury, PVD, and valve disease were significantly associated with increased unexpected ICU admission; patients with CVA suffered increased mortality when admitted to the ICU.
Source: Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
BOSTON (CBS) — A Boston woman is waiting for a new heart this Valentine’s Day. But while her heart may be broken, she is living as though it is full. Cindy Washington was 19 and a freshman at Northeastern University pursuing a pre-law degree when she became overwhelmingly tired. “I started to lose my breath and to sweat a lot,” Cindy recalls. After many trips to the ER, doctors finally figured out her heart was enlarged, weak and failing. In fact, Cindy’s heart was so sick she went into cardiac arrest twice, both times revived by her mom. “She had to bring me to the floor and pump and re...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Healthwatch Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Heart Transplant Valentine's Day Source Type: news
Source: Artificial Organs - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
Abstract ObjectiveInfants with single ventricle physiology typically undergo cardiac catheterization prior to superior cavopulmonary anastomosis (SCPA) to assess operative suitability. Predictors of poor outcome at sea level include elevated pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP), indexed pulmonary vascular resistance (PVRi), age
Source: Congenital Heart Disease - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
by Ca íque Bueno Terhoch, Henry Fukuda Moreira, Silvia Moreira Ayub-Ferreira, Germano Emilio Conceição-Souza, Vera Maria Cury Salemi, Paulo Roberto Chizzola, Mucio Tavares Oliveira Jr, Silvia Helena Gelas Lage, Edimar Alcides Bocchi, Victor Sarli Issa AimsExplore the association between clinical findings and prognosis in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) and analyze the influence of etiology on clinical presentation and prognosis. Methods and resultsProspective cohort of 500 patients admitted with ADHF from Aug/2013-Feb/2016; patients were predominantly male (61.8%), median age was...
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
In conclusion, most experimental data on immune changes with aging show a decline in many immune parameters when compared to young healthy subjects. The bulk of these changes is termed immunosenescence. Immunosenescence has been considered for some time as detrimental because it often leads to subclinical accumulation of pro-inflammatory factors and inflammaging. Together, immunosenescence and inflammaging are suggested to stand at the origin of most of the diseases of the elderly, such as infections, cancer, autoimmune disorders, and chronic inflammatory diseases. However, an increasing number of gerontologists have chall...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
More News: Anatomy | Cardiology | Cardiovascular | Heart | Heart Disease | Heart Transplant | Learning | Opthalmology | Smokers | Study | Universities & Medical Training | Vitamin A