Family History and Genomics as Tools for Cancer Prevention Family History and Genomics as Tools for Cancer Prevention

This brief examines the role of public health initiatives for cancer genomics at the federal, state, and community level, with a focus on hereditary breast and ovarian cancers and Lynch syndrome.Morbidity &Mortality Weekly Report
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology Journal Article Source Type: news

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ConclusionTo optimize targeting and visualization of the surgical field in right pelvic sidewall/paracolic gutter, robotic arms can be placed in a straight line from above the pubic symphysis extending to the left subcostal line and between the midline vertical and midclavicular lines. Robotic tumor debulking should be considered in selected patients with recurrent ovarian cancer who present with oligo-metastatic disease, in the absence of carcinomatosis.
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
ConclusionsRobotic resection of the tumor nodule off the external iliac vessels was successfully performed with adequate range of motion provided by the arms and without any complications.Trocar placement should be tailored to the site of surgical interest. Robotic-assisted laparoscopy should be considered as a valid alternative to the traditional open approach, when managing solitary masses in recurrent ovarian cancer patients.
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Pancreatic cancer is a rare cancer that carries a poor 5 year survival rate of approximately 5% [1]. Approximately 5% to 10% of individuals with pancreatic cancer report having a closely related family member also being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer [2]. Several known genetic syndromes, such as hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC) [3], Lynch syndrome [4], familial adenomatous polyposis [5], familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome [6], hereditary pancreatitis [7], Peutz-Jeghers syndrome [8], and Li-Fraumeni syndrome [9] are associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer.
Source: Cancer Genetics and Cytogenetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract About 5% of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases occurred in the context of an underlying hereditary predisposition syndrome. Lynch syndrome is the main causes of hereditary CRC but is also associated with a higher risk of other cancers (such as endometrial cancer and ovarian cancer). It is the consequence of constitutional mutation in a MisMatch Repair (MMR) gene, involved in DNA repair: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2; or of the EPCAM gene (MSH2 promotor). If a mutation predisposing to Lynch Syndrome is identified in an individual, special monitoring should be initiated, adapted to estimated cancer risk. Clinical cri...
Source: Presse Medicale - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Presse Med Source Type: research
This study aimed to investigate the spectrum of germ-line mutations in Russian LS patients. LS-related mismatch repair (MMR) genes were analyzed in 16 patients, who were forwarded to genetic testing due to strong clinical features of LS and had high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H) in the tumor (n = 14) or unknown MSI status (n = 2). In addition, 672 consecutive colorectal cancer (CRC) cases were screened for family history; 15 patients were younger than 50 years and reported 2 or more instances of LS-related cancers in 1st- or 2nd-degree relatives. Seven of these cases demonstrated MSI-H and th...
Source: European Journal of Medical Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Eur J Med Genet Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 21 August 2019Source: Journal of Visceral SurgeryAuthor(s): B. Menahem, A. Alves, J.M. Regimbeau, C. SabbaghSummaryNearly 5% of colorectal cancers are related to constitutional genetic abnormalities. In Lynch Syndrome (LS), the abnormality is a mutation of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) repair system. The goal of this update is to update indications and surgical strategies for patients with LS. Different spectra of disease are associated with LS. The narrow spectrum includes cancers with a high relative risk: colorectal cancer (CRC), endometrial cancer, urinary tract cancers and small in...
Source: Journal of Visceral Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
ConclusionsThe data suggest that feeling efficacious about managing one ’s Lynch syndrome and screening is related to positive interactions and communication with one’s family physician. While this is encouraging, future research should examine educating both family physicians and patients about current guidelines for Lynch syndrome gynecological screening recommend ations.
Source: Hereditary Cancer in Clinical Practice - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Lynch Syndrome (LS) is a dominantly inherited condition with incomplete penetrance, characterized by high predisposition to colorectal cancer (CRC), endometrial and ovarian cancers, as well as to other tumors. LS is associated with constitutive DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects, and carriers of the same pathogenic variants can show great phenotypic heterogeneity in terms of cancer spectrum. In the last years, human gut microbiota got a foothold among risk factors responsible for the onset and evolution of sporadic CRC, but its possible involvement in the modulation of LS patients’ phenotype still needs to be inv...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
ConclusionCurettage for miscarriage or undesired pregnancy is not exempt from complications, such as hemorrhage, simple perforation, and infection. Intrauterine fallopian tube incarceration is uncommon but can affect fertility. This diagnosis is important to avoid destruction of the fimbriae and necrosis of the tube and also to reduce the risk of ectopic pregnancy.
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Geneticist who unlocked the secrets of hereditary cancersIn 1962 a medical intern sat with a man recovering from alcohol poisoning in a veterans ’ hospital in the US state of Nebraska. Henry Lynch, who has died aged 91, listened as the young farm worker told him that he liked to drown his sorrows because, as with everyone else in his family, he was pretty much guaranteed to die young of cancer.Lynch, with a background in genetics and psychology, wanted to know more about this family and its high prevalence of cancer. His investigations intothis and other such families led to the discovery of hereditary non-polyposis ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Genetics Biology People in science Cancer research Medical research Medicine Education Source Type: news
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