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These Lifestyle Factors Are Linked To Sperm Damage

By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) – - Certain lifestyle factors are linked to higher rates of damage in the genetic material in men’s sperm, a study suggests.  The damage - which may stem from factors like obesity, stress and even cell phone use - could affect men's ability to conceive as well as the genes passed to their children, researchers say. Semen analysis usually looks at the numbers and the condition of whole sperm. But the authors of a small study in Poland believe the degree of breakage, or fragmentation, in DNA strands in the sperm might be a better indicator of fertility. DNA carries the cell's genetic information and hereditary characteristics. Men with fragmentation have lower odds of conceiving naturally and through procedures like in vitro fertilization, they write in the International Journal of Impotence Research. Researchers have noticed before that lifestyle factors can influence the level of sperm DNA fragmentation, said Ricardo P. Bertolla of Sao Paulo Federal University in Brazil, who was not part of the new study. “More importantly, we do expect that environmental and lifestyle factors may influence male fertility, but the degree of response is highly variable among individuals,” Bertolla told Reuters Health by email. Dr. Marian Radwan of Gameta Hospital in Rzgow, Poland, focused their study on 286 men under age 45 who were attending an infertility clinic. Radwan did not respond to a request for comment. Most of the m...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news

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Epidemiological studies revealed a decreased susceptibility to develop an allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) in individuals with autoimmune diseases like type I diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis compared to healthy individuals. However, the clinical relevance of this inverse correlation has not been evaluated so far. In our study, we want to confirm these results by analyzing the induction of a contact hypersensitivity (CHS) reaction, which resembles the ACD in humans, in non-obese diabetes (NOD) mice spontaneously developing an autoimmune insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus was analysed.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Adaptive and Auto-Immunity Source Type: research
Incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) exceeds all other types of cancer combined. Cumulative and intermittent sun exposure are known risk factors for the development of NMSC. Since obesity has been shown to contribute to cancer incidence, we hypothesized that heavier individuals (BMI> 25 kg/m2) have increased the risk of NMSC when accounting for sun exposure. Using the Womens Health Initiative (WHI) cohort, we investigated the risk of NMSC with sun exposure and anthropometric measures. We analyzed the incidence of NMSC associated with sun exposure: reported duration (behavioral) and intensity (geographic location)...
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Clinical Research: Epidemiology of Skin Diseases Source Type: research
Previous study regarding association between obesity and chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) is scarce. The aim was to investigate the impact of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumferences (WC) on the risk of CSU in the Korean adult population. We used the health check-up database, which is sub-dataset of the Korean National Health Insurance Service database. Study population included subjects who underwent at least one biennial health check-up between 2009 and 2012. General obesity and abdominal obesity were defined by BMI and WC.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Clinical Research: Epidemiology of Skin Diseases Source Type: research
More recently, studies have shown that psoriasis have an increased risk of conditions such as cardiovascular disease, obesity and metabolic syndrome. Omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have anti-inflammatory properties and are associated with reduced CVD risk. In Japanese study, high serum EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid)/AA (arachidonic acid) ratio (>0.404) was significantly associated with a low incidence (12.7%) of MACE compared with lower EPA/AA (23.9%). But it has not been reported the EPA/AA ratio in psoriasis patients.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Clinical Research: Patient Outcomes Research Source Type: research
Psoriasis and atopic dermatitis (AD) are common inflammatory skin diseases reported to be associated with obesity, but the direction(s) of causality remain unclear. Mendelian Randomisation (MR) can be used to test for a causal relationship between a heritable phenotype and a possible clinical outcome. Genetic variants are used as an instrument to investigate causality and this reduces confounding and reverse causality. Our aim was to investigate a possible causal relationship between body mass index (BMI) and psoriasis or AD.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Clinical Research: Pathophysiology and Therapeutics Source Type: research
Ozonated oil, containing the potent disinfectant and oxygen donor ozone (O3), improves wound oxygenation and closure after topical application. However, the mechanism of O3 action on skin cells during wound healing is largely unknown. We hypothesized that IGF1R/EGFR crosstalk and activation of downstream signaling pathways are required for the observed acceleration in wound healing. In a diet-induced obese diabetic mouse model, topical application of O3 oil visibly promoted healing with a 2-3-fold reduction in the epidermal gap and 1.7-fold increase in granulation tissue compared with vehicle-treated mice at 8 days after i...
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Growth Factors, Cell Adhesion and Matrix Biology Source Type: research
In this study, we seek to determine: (i) the pathogenic role of psoriasis-signature cytokines in the development of adipocyte-related disorders, and (ii) the role of adipose tissue-derived mediators in triggering and/or amplifying skin inflammation.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Innate Immunity, Microbiology, Inflammation Source Type: research
Neutrophilic folliculitis is a common skin condition caused by various factors such as bacterial infection and physical or chemical irritation. It has been reported that obese individuals develop severe neutrophilic folliculitis more often than normal weight or lean individuals. However, whether and how obesity affects the development of neutrophilic folliculitis has not been well investigated. Using a high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese model and a phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced irritant dermatitis model, we found that HFD-fed obese mice exhibited dense focal accumulation of neutrophils that formed numerous i...
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Innate Immunity, Microbiology, Inflammation Source Type: research
A growing body of epidemiological research has clearly shown that obesity is often co-associated with psoriasis. A high fat and high sugar diet (i.e., Western diet, WD) that characterizes the diet in many Western countries plays a role in the development of obesity. In the current study, we hypothesize that WD predisposes mice to psoriasiform dermatitis (PsD) that resembles human psoriasis and examine expression of psoriasis-related cytokines in WD- and control chow-fed mice. Herein, C57BL/6 mice were fed with WD or control diet (CD) for up to 16 weeks.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Innate Immunity, Microbiology, Inflammation Source Type: research
Psoriasis, a chronic inflammatory skin disease, is often compromised by comorbidities with obesity being the most prevalent. Epidemiological studies clearly associate obesity with psoriasis. The aim of the present study was to investigate how obesity alters skin immune responses. To this end, an obesity model was established by feeding of male C57Bl/6J mice with high-fat diet (HFD, 60% fat). To investigate the effect of obesity on Th17/Th1-mediated skin inflammation, a mouse model of 2,4,6-trinitrochlorobenzene (TNCB) contact hypersensitivity (CHS) was used.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Innate Immunity, Microbiology, Inflammation Source Type: research
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