Downregulation of Tryptophan-related Metabolomic Profile in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fluid.

Downregulation of Tryptophan-related Metabolomic Profile in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fluid. J Rheumatol. 2015 Sep 1; Authors: Kang KY, Lee SH, Jung SM, Park SH, Jung BH, Ju JH Abstract OBJECTIVE: Synovial fluid (SF) is one of the most important materials that reflect the pathophysiological process of arthritis. A metabolomic and lipidomic study of SF was performed with the aim of identifying tentative diagnostic markers or therapeutic candidates for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: SF was aspirated from 10 patients with RA and 10 patients with osteoarthritis (OA). RA SF and OA SF were collected and analyzed by ultraperformance liquid chromatography quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Associations among clinical variables, laboratory results, and metabolic profiles were investigated. RESULTS: The metabolic pathways for carnitine, tryptophan, phenylalanine, arachidonic acid, and glycophospholipid were significantly upregulated in OA SF. The metabolic pathways for taurine, cholesterol ester, and the β-oxidation of pristine acid, linolenic acid, and sphingolipid were activated more in RA SF than in OA SF. In particular, the tryptophan pathway, which comprises kynurenine, indoleacetic acid, indole acetaldehyde, and N'-formylkynurenine, was downregulated. Interestingly, the levels of tryptophan metabolites kynurenine and N'-formylkynurenine, which are involved in immune tolerance, were significantly lower in RA SF compared with O...
Source: J Rheumatol - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: J Rheumatol Source Type: research

Related Links:

Conclusion: Our meta-analysis results revealed higher cardiovascular risk in OA patients. This highlights the importance of cardiovascular risk factor management in OA.
Source: Joint Bone Spine - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
ConclusionThe risk score accurately categorizes the 1 ‐year risk of major toxicity among NSAID users and may be useful in identifying patients who can safely use these agents.
Source: Arthritis and Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
In this study, we found that cofilin competes with tau for direct microtubule binding in vitro, in cells, and in vivo, which inhibits tau-induced microtubule assembly. Genetic reduction of cofilin mitigates tauopathy and synaptic defects in Tau-P301S mice and movement deficits in tau transgenic C. elegans. The pathogenic effects of cofilin are selectively mediated by activated cofilin, as active but not inactive cofilin selectively interacts with tubulin, destabilizes microtubules, and promotes tauopathy. These results therefore indicate that activated cofilin plays an essential intermediary role in neurotoxic signaling th...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
ConclusionThe risk score accurately categorizes the one ‐year risk of major toxicity among NSAID users and may be useful in identifying patients who can safely use these agents.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Source: Arthritis and Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: Full Length Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study indicates that frailty and other age-related diseases could be prevented and significantly reduced in older adults. Getting our heart risk factors under control could lead to much healthier old ages. Unfortunately, the current obesity epidemic is moving the older population in the wrong direction, however our study underlines how even small reductions in risk are worthwhile." The study analysed data from more than 421,000 people aged 60-69 in both GP medical records and in the UK Biobank research study. Participants were followed up over ten years. The researchers analysed six factors that could impa...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
The objective of this study was to evaluate oxidation products of arachidonic acid and linoleic acid in lipoproteins and synovial fluid (SF) from patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared to non-RA controls. High-density lipoproteins (HDL) and low-density lipoproteins (LDL) were isolated from plasma using fast protein liquid chromatography and HDL was isolated from SF using dextran sulfate precipitation. 5-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE), 12-HETE, 15-HETE, 9 hydroxyoctadecadienoic (HODE), and 13-HODE levels were measured in HDL, LDL, and SF by liquid chromatography –tandem mass spectrometry. HDL&rsq...
Source: Clinical Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that TIGIT is a prominent negative immune regulator involved in immunosenescence. This novel finding is highly significant, as targeting TIGIT might be an effective strategy to improve the immune response and decrease age-related comorbidities. Delivery of Extracellular Vesicles as a Potential Basis for Therapies https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/01/delivery-of-extracellular-vesicles-as-a-potential-basis-for-therapies/ Here I'll point out a readable open access review paper on the potential use of extracellular vesicles as a basis for therapy: harveste...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, documentation is important, a critical part of advocacy and the development process at the larger scale. It isn't just words, but rather a vital structural flow of information from one part of the larger community to another, necessary to sustain progress in any complex field. We would all do well to remember this - and to see that building this documentation is an activity in which we can all pitch in to help. Evidence Suggests that, at Least in Earlier Stages, Alzheimer's Disease Blocks Rather than Destroys Memories https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2017/07/evidence-suggests-that-at-least-in-ea...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
More News: Arthritis | Cholesterol | Laboratory Medicine | Osteoarthritis | Rheumatoid Arthritis | Rheumatology | Study