Rising CO2 levels could leave as many as 200 million people worldwide deficient in nutrients
A new study from the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health says the increasing levels of CO2 are decreasing the amounts of protein, iron, and zinc in crops such as rice and wheat. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Which foods lower blood sugar?
Eating a varied, nutritious diet is beneficial for everyone, but is especially important for people with diabetes. In this article, learn which foods can help keep blood sugar levels in check, including oatmeal, cold-water fish, whole wheat bread, legumes, and sweet potatoes. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Epic genetic: the hidden story of wheat
(Earlham Institute) Published in Genome Research, based on a novel method developed by Earlham Institute, UK, an international research team have uncovered the hidden genetic secrets that give wheat its remarkable ability for local adaptation -- revealing a previously untapped resource for breeding better, more resilient wheat. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Entire Bread Wheat Genome Fully Annotated
It took an international group of researchers 13 years to crack the code and their efforts are already bearing fruit—one study has pinned down the genes responsible for wheat allergies and... (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - August 17, 2018 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Scientists sequence wheat genome in breakthrough once thought 'impossible'
Genome able to be used to produce hardier wheat varieties as greater food security neededSequencing the wheat genome – once considered by scientists to be an insurmountable task – has been achieved through a worldwide collaboration of researchers spanning 13 years.On Friday the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC)published a detailed description of the genome of bread wheat in the journal Science.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Davey Tags: Agriculture Science Food security Australia news Source Type: news

A rich scientific harvest is in: Long, complex bread wheat genome is finally sequenced
It has been called the Mt. Everest of the genome world, and it has just been scaled.This week a consortium of more than 200 scientists from 20 countries published the first fully annotated sequence of the massive wheat genome, a feat they hope will eventually reduce the risk of food scarcity on... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - August 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

MSU plant sciences faculty part of international discovery in wheat genome sequence
(Montana State University) Hikmet Budak, Winifred Asbjornson Plant Sciences Chair, is one of 200 international scientists who co-published an article this week detailing the description of the genome of bread wheat. The implications of the publication include greater food security. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 16, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Wheat code finally cracked; wheat genome sequence will bring stronger varieties to farmers
(Kansas State University) Kansas State University scientists, in collaboration with the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium, published today in the international journal Science a detailed description of the complete genome of bread wheat, the world's most widely cultivated crop. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 16, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UMD researcher helps to crack the genetic code for wheat for the first time
(University of Maryland) The University of Maryland as part of the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium published findings in Science detailing the full wheat genome, the world's most widely cultivated crop. A companion paper is available in the same issue with UMD and the John Innes Centre, using this sequence to examine gene expression in wheat, specifically relating to heat, drought, and disease. This paves the way for wheat varieties adapted to climate, enhancing yields, nutrition, and sustainability. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Detailed genome maps paths to better wheat
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Pennisi, E. Tags: Genetics In Depth Source Type: news

Insights from the annotated wheat genome
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Zahn, L. M. Tags: Botany, Ecology twis Source Type: news

The transcriptional landscape of polyploid wheat
The coordinated expression of highly related homoeologous genes in polyploid species underlies the phenotypes of many of the world’s major crops. Here we combine extensive gene expression datasets to produce a comprehensive, genome-wide analysis of homoeolog expression patterns in hexaploid bread wheat. Bias in homoeolog expression varies between tissues, with ~30% of wheat homoeologs showing nonbalanced expression. We found expression asymmetries along wheat chromosomes, with homoeologs showing the largest inter-tissue, inter-cultivar, and coding sequence variation, most often located in high-recombination distal en...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ramirez-Gonzalez, R. H., Borrill, P., Lang, D., Harrington, S. A., Brinton, J., Venturini, L., Davey, M., Jacobs, J., van Ex, F., Pasha, A., Khedikar, Y., Robinson, S. J., Cory, A. T., Florio, T., Concia, L., Juery, C., Schoonbeek, H., Steuernagel, B., Xi Tags: Botany, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Shifting the limits in wheat research and breeding using a fully annotated reference genome
An annotated reference sequence representing the hexaploid bread wheat genome in 21 pseudomolecules has been analyzed to identify the distribution and genomic context of coding and noncoding elements across the A, B, and D subgenomes. With an estimated coverage of 94% of the genome and containing 107,891 high-confidence gene models, this assembly enabled the discovery of tissue- and developmental stage–related coexpression networks by providing a transcriptome atlas representing major stages of wheat development. Dynamics of complex gene families involved in environmental adaptation and end-use quality were revealed ...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: The International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC), IWGSC RefSeq principal investigators:, Appels, R., Eversole, K., Feuillet, C., Keller, B., Rogers, J., Stein, N., IWGSC whole-genome assembly principal investigators:, Pozniak, C. J., Stein, N. Tags: Botany, Ecology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Is Oatmeal Healthy? Here ’s What the Experts Say
Oatmeal is a near-universally beloved breakfast. While it has historically been enjoyed across Europe, Russia and the U.S., oatmeal is rapidly gaining popularity in developing countries because of its affordability and its perceived health properties. But is oatmeal really good for you? To answer that question, it’s first important to differentiate among all the different types of oatmeal. There’s steel-cut and rolled, quick-cooking and instant. But all of these terms refer to different methods of preparing hulled oats for cooking. “You can’t eat an unprocessed oat straight from the field,” sa...
Source: TIME: Health - August 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

Epidemiology: Separating the Wheat From the Chaff Epidemiology: Separating the Wheat From the Chaff
If the latest headline linking X or Y food with cancer or heart disease induces eye-rolling, read epidemiologist Christopher Labos ' tips on how to weigh the strength of the evidence.theheart.org on Medscape (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - August 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Article Source Type: news